Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 25 AD or search for 25 AD in all documents.

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Piso 29. L. Calpurnius Piso, praetor in Nearer Spain in A. D. 25, was murdered in the province while travelling. (Tac. Ann. 4.45.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
in Livy (Quint. Inst. 1.5.56, 8.1.3), respecting which some remarks are made in the life of Livy. [Vol. II. p. 795.] Pollio had a son, C. Asinius Gallus Saloninus, who is spoken of elsewhere. [GALLUS, No. 2.] Asinius Gallus married Vipsania, the daughter of Agrippa and Pomponia, the former wife of Tiberius, by whom he had several children: namely, 1. Asinius Saloninus. (Tac. Ann. 3.75 ) 2. Asinius Gallus. [GALLUS, No. 3.] 3. Asinius Pollio, spoken of below [No. 2], Asinius Agrippa, consul A. D. 25 [AGRIPPA, p. 77a], Asinius Celer. [CELER.] (Lipsius, ad Tac. Ann. 3.75.) (The following are the most important authorities for the life of Pollio, in addition to those which have been cited above: Cic. Fam. 9.25, 10.31, 11.9, ad Att. 12.2, 38, 39, 13.20; Appian, App. BC 2.40, 45, 82, 3.46, 74, 97, 4.12, 27, 5.20-23, 50, 64; Vell. 2.63, 76, 86; D. C. 45.10, 48.15, 41; and among modern writers, Eckhard, Commentatio de C. Asimo, iniquo optimorum Latinorum auctorum censore, Jen. 1793, and esp
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Salvia'nus, Calpu'rnius accused Sex. Marius in A. D. 25, but having been rebuked by Tiberius for bringing forward the accusation, he was banished by the senate. (Tac. Ann. 4.36.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Secundus, Sa'trius a dependent of Sejanus, accused Cremutius Cordus in A. D. 25. He afterwards betrayed his master, and gave information to Tiberius of the conspiracy which Sejanus had formed against him. Josephus relates (Ant. 18.6) that Antonia informed Tiberius of the conspiracy of Sejanus; and hence it has been conjectured that Secundus, unwilling or unable to have an interview with the emperor, had acquainted Antonia with the plot. Secundus was married to the notorious Albucilla. (Tac. Ann. 4.34, 6.6, 47; Senec. Consol. ad Marciam, 22.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
C. Si'lius Ita'licus the most voluminous among the Roman writers of heroic verse, was born about A. D. 25. From his early years he devoted himself to oratory and poetry, taking Cicero as his model in the former, and Virgil in the latter. He acquired great reputation as a pleader at the bar, and acted for some time as a member of that body of judicial umpires who were known as the Centumvirs. His life, in so far as we can trace it, presents a course of unbroken prosperity. He was elevated to the consulship in A. D. 68, the year in which Nero perished; he was admitted to familiar intercourse with Vitellius, and subsequently discharged the duties of proconsul of Asia with high renown. After enjoying for a lengthened period the dignities of political and literary fame without incurring the envy which is for the most part the lot of distinguished statesmen and authors, he determined to retire from the busy world, and to pass his old age among his numerous villas, which were abundantly furn
oskurd infers that Strabo died about A. D. 24 Strabo (lib. xii. p. 576) says that Cyzicus was still a free state; but in A. D. 25, Cyzicus lost its privilege as a Libera Civitas (amisere libertatem ; Tac. Ann. 4.36; D. C. 54.7). Accordingly, Groskurd concludes that Strabo was dead in A. D. 25; but this is not a necessary conclusion. We can only conclude that the passage about Cyzicus was written before A. D. 25. In the seventeenth and last book (p. 828, &c.) he mentions the death of Juba II. as A. D. 25. In the seventeenth and last book (p. 828, &c.) he mentions the death of Juba II. as a recent occurrence, and he also mentions the fact of Juba being succeeded by his son Ptolemaeus. Juba died in A. D. 21. The conclusion that Strabo died in A. D. 24 is unsupported by any evidence. We only know that he died after A. D. 21. Groskurd's reckoning makes Strabo attain the age of near ninety. In fact he may have lived after A. D. 25, and may have been more than ninety when he died; but as the year of his birth is unknown, we cannot fix the limit of his age. As to the time at which he
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