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made by the troops of General Howard, up a steep and difficult hill, over two hundred feet high, completely routing the enemy, and driving him from his barricades on its top, and the repulse by General Geary's command of greatly superior numbers, who attempted to surprise him, will rank among the most distinguished feats of arms of this war. --A sharp fight occurred at Stevensburgh, Virginia, between General Kilpatrick's cavalry and a party of rebels, who were defeated. The battles of Rappahannock Station and Kelly's Ford, Virginia, were fought this day, resulting in the retreat of the rebels across the Rappahannock River.--(Doc. 10.) General Duffie, in command of the National forces, occupied Lewisburgh, Virginia, this morning; the rebels had passed through in their retreat from General Averill, just previous to his arrival. General Duffie captured the rebel camp, tents, provisions, and one cannon, many prisoners and one hundred head of cattle.--General Kelley's Despatch.
November 17. Nearly a hundred prisoners captured by General Averill in his engagement with the rebels in Pocahontas County, Va., arrived at Wheeling this morning, and were committed to the Athenaeum. There was scarcely a whole suit of clothes in the party, and many of them were without shoes. Judging from the fact that a fall of snow was lately announced in the vicinity of where the fight took place, these shoeless rebels must have suffered terribly from the cold. The schooner Joseph L. Gerity, on a voyage from Matamoras to New York, with a cargo of cotton and six passengers, was seized by the latter, who overcame the captain and crew; and after keeping them in confinement eight days, set them adrift at sea in a small boat, in which they eventually landed on the coast of Sisal. After the crew and captain were put in the boat the captors hoisted the rebel flag and fired a salute with pistols, declaring that they would carry vessel and cargo into Honduras and sell them.
November 18. The firing on Fort Sumter from the National batteries continued. A rebel mortar battery on Sullivan's Island shelled Gregg and the Cummings Point defences all day.--General Longstreet made an attack upon the Union outposts, on the Kingston road, near Knoxville, Tenn., and compelled General Sanders, in command of the forces there, to fall back to the town.--Doc. 19. General Averill arrived at New Creek, Va. At or near Covington he encountered and dispersed a portion of Imboden's command on their way to reenforce Echols, and captured twenty-five prisoners in the skirmish. The cavalry belonging to the Union forces under the command of Brigadier-General J. C. Sullivan, sent out from Harper's Ferry, Va., returned this day, having been up the Valley to near New Market, fighting Gilmore's and White's commands at Mount Jackson, bringing in twenty-seven prisoners, two commissioned officers, ninety head of cattle, three four-horse teams, besides thirty tents and a
kirmish, the rebels fled, leaving ten of their number in the hands of the Nationals.--the bark Saxon arrived at New York last night, in charge of Acting Master E. S. Keyser. She was captured by the gunboat Vanderbilt, on the twenty-ninth of October, on the west coast of Africa, four hundred miles north of the Cape of Good Hope, and had on board part of the cargo of the bark Conrad which vessel was captured by the pirate Alabama, and afterward converted into the pirate Tuscaloosa.--Brigadier-General Averill, arrived at Edray, Va., having successfully accomplished his expedition to cut the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad.--(Doc. 25.) A squad of forty men, under Major White, of the First regiment of confederate cavalry, made a dash into Cleveland, Tenn., driving in the National pickets, killing one, wounding several, and capturing six, besides twelve horses, and some small-arms.--John Kelly was killed by a party of guerrillas, on the Arkansas shore of the Mississippi River, opposit
umberland, Va., was attacked at half-past 1 P. M. yesterday, by five hundred rebel cavalry, under General Rosser, and after a spirited resistance, in which two were killed and ten wounded, the greater part of the company were captured. This accomplished, the rebels set fire to the bridge, and leaving it to destruction, started off with their prisoners in the direction of Romney. The employes of the railroad succeeded in staying the fire, and saved the bridge, with only slight damage. General Averill, with his command of nearly two thousand cavalry, and who had been sent out from Martinsburgh by General Kelley, this morning overtook the rebels near Springfield, and a severe engagement ensued. The rebels were driven through Springfield, and thence to and south of Burlington. Many of the rebels were killed and wounded, and the Union captures were large, including the recovery of the men yesterday taken at Patterson's Creek, and many horses. The enemy retreated rapidly to the back c
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