Your search returned 821 results in 312 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
t reached us to-day of a severe fight last Monday (21st), at Leesburg — a Manassas fight in a small way. The Federals, under General Stone, came in large force to the river; they crossed in the morning 8,000 or 10,000 strong, under command of Colonel Baker, late Senator from Oregon. They came with all the pomp and circumstance of glorious war, and rushed on as if to certain victory over our small force. But when the sun set, where were they? They were flying back to Maryland, that her hills is dreadful to think of the dead and the dying, the widows and the orphans. Mr. William Randolph, who brought us this account, says there were between five and six hundred prisoners, a number of wounded, and 400 killed and drowned-among them Colonel Baker killed. They had no business here on such an errand; but who, with a human heart, does not feel a pang at the thought that each one had somebody to grieve for himsomebody who will look long for the return of each one of the four hundred! Th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A correction of General Patton Andersons report of the battle of Jonesboro, Ga. (search)
r understood, let it be remembered that General Anderson commanded the front line, composed of Deas', Brantley's. and Sharpe's brigades. The second or supporting line was commanded by myself, and was composed of Gibson's brigade in the centre, Holtzclaw's brigade (Colonel Bush. Jones commanding) on the right, and Mannegault's brigade, of Anderson's division, on the left. Stovals' brigade, of my division, had that morning been sent to report to General Stevenson, further to our left, and Baker's had several days before been sent to Mobile. Preparatory to moving forward, brigade commanders had been instructed that they should halt beyond certain earthworks and fallen timber in our front, to correct the alignment, before morning, to the assault, and that they would be guided by the centre. When this point was reached, seeing that the troops in the front line were already falling back, and fearing the effect on my own, and seeing, also, now that the attack had begun, the import
run on them, or Saratogas be established in their vicinity, is with me a matter of exceeding doubt. The only things we have seen of much interest are the mountains and the lakes,--both fine in their way, but rather hard to get at. To-morrow I shall go into the main camp, and hope to find things about ready for me to start into the town incognito to the northward. I shall send an express in a day or two with reports to the Secretary of War, and this at the same time. I hope to reach M. t. Baker in about twenty days from here. Where I will go to then, circumstances must determine,--I think to Colville,--perhaps thence to the Rocky Mountains. Lieutenant Mowry had returned from the Dalles on the 2d of September, and on the 16th Lieutenant Hodges arrived from Steilacoom, bringing twenty-nine pack-horses loaded with provisions. Preparations were now made to move northward: thirty-two broken-down horses were sent back, under charge of three men, to the Dalles, and the command was r
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
e victory claimed, but of any serious engagement. On the 21st, Evans's brigade, near Leesburg, was attacked by a detachment of Federal troops, commanded by Colonel Baker. Four Federal regiments crossed the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry, and were held in check by Colonel Barksdale's (Thirteenth) Mississippi regiment. Five others, under Colonel Baker's immediate direction, crossed the river at the same time at Ball's Bluff, and were met by Hunton's (Eighth Virginia), Featherston's (Seventeenth Mississippi), and Burt's (Eighteenth Mississippi) regiments, and after an obstinate contest driven over Ball's Bluff in such a panic that numbers rushed into the river and were drowned. Colonel Baker had fallen on the field. Brigadier-General Evans reported that the Confederate loss was thirty-six killed, including the gallant Colonel Burt, one hundred and seventeen wounded, and two captured; and that of the enemy, thirteen hundred killed, wounded, and drowned, and seven hundred and ten pri
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ever, they were compelled first to.pause, and then to fall back, by the obstinate resistance they encountered. They were led forward again, advancing as resolutely, and approaching as near to the Confederate line as before, but were a second time repulsed by the firmness of their opponents, and their deliberate fire of canister-shot and musketry. The engagement was continued in this manner almost two hours, when the assailants drew off. In this action a few of the men of Clayton's and Baker's brigades were partially sheltered by a hasty arrangement of some fallen timber which they found near their line. The other brigade engaged, Stovall's, had no such protection. Nothing entitled to the term breastworks had been constructed by the division. We found, next morning, that the Federal line extended much farther to our right than it had done the day before. Polk's corps was transferred to the right of Hood's, therefore, covering the road to Acworth. Consequently, all the gr
In the thickest of the contest a secession colonel of cavalry was knocked out of his saddle by a ball from one of our riflemen. There goes old Baker, of the Georgia first! shouted one of our boys, in hearing of his chaplain. Who? queried the parson. Colonel Baker, of the rebel ranks, has just gone to his long home. Ah, well, replied the chaplain, quietly, the longer I live the less cause I have to find fault with the inscrutable acts of Divine Providence. --An unlucky private in one oColonel Baker, of the rebel ranks, has just gone to his long home. Ah, well, replied the chaplain, quietly, the longer I live the less cause I have to find fault with the inscrutable acts of Divine Providence. --An unlucky private in one of the New York regiments was wounded in this fight, and his father arrived at the hospital just as the surgeon was removing the ball from the back of his shoulder. The boy lay with his face downwards on the pallet. Ah, my poor son, said the father, mournfully, I'm very sorry for you. But it's a bad place to be hit in — thus in the back. The sufferer turned over, bared his breast, and pointing to the opening above the arm-pit, exclaimed, Father, here's where the ball went in! One of the Zo
st with him at the Astor House. Myself and staff accepted a like invitation from Mr. Paran Stevens, the landlord of the Fifth Avenue Hotel. There I first met Senator Baker, of Oregon, afterwards General Baker, and who was detailed to me at Fortress Monroe. As we stood together on the balcony of the hotel, my regiment passed by, General Baker, and who was detailed to me at Fortress Monroe. As we stood together on the balcony of the hotel, my regiment passed by, cheering me very lustily. Baker, who had been in the Mexican War, turned to me and said: All very well, General, for them to cheer you when they go out, but take care of them so that they will cheer you on their return. We embarked at Jersey City about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, as soon as the trains could be prepared; TheBaker, who had been in the Mexican War, turned to me and said: All very well, General, for them to cheer you when they go out, but take care of them so that they will cheer you on their return. We embarked at Jersey City about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, as soon as the trains could be prepared; There was a little delay there because the railroad people said they could not get cars to carry us without discommoding their passenger trains; and I said to the official that we must go whether the passenger trains went or not. With some hesitation he yielded to necessity. We arrived at Philadelphia between four and five o'clock
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
Senate. Of course every Democrat voted against me, and so did some of the Republicans, for various reasons. I suppose I should have failed of confirmation if Colonel Baker, then senator from Oregon, who had been detailed to do duty with me at Fortress Monroe, had not been in his seat and explained the senselessness of the clamor.he meantime neither horses nor artillery came. I did, however, get a very valuable reinforcement of a California regiment and a half, at the head of which was Colonel Baker, who had had some experience in Mexico as an officer. We agreed to attempt, as soon as our horses and artillery should come, an expedition that would reflect ide, as I shall take leave to make plain hereafter, an order came on the 24th of July that all my effective forces should be removed to Baltimore together with Colonel Baker. They had become so frightened at Washington that they supposed the secessionists of Baltimore would rise, while there was no more danger of it than there was
stralian ballot law criticised, 115. B Babcock, Colonel, bearer of order relieving Butler of command, 827. Badeau, General, in military history of General Grant, 856, 857, 859, 860 ; in Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, 859; character and career, 860; references to, 875. Bailey, Capt., Theodorus, consulted regarding operations against New Orleans, 359; passes the forts, 365-367; and Lieutenant Perkins first to enter New Orleans, 370; Vice-Admiral suit in prize court, 1010-1012. Baker, admonition to, Senator from Oregon afterwards General, 175; Colonel defends Butler in Senate, 275; assigned to Butler's command, 276-277. Ballot law, secret of 1850, 114; Australian criticised, 115. Baltimore, passage of Sixth Regiment through, 175, 181; occupation of, 225, 237; Butler brings troops to, 694; Convention, 982. Banks, Gen. N. P., coalitionist leader, 98; failed to collect assessment in New Orleans, 436-437; disobeys Halleck's orders, 459; injustice towards negro volu
de was added on Oct. 5. About the same date--i.e., within two or three days after the formation of the Army of the Potomac--the troops under Gen. Banks were organized as a division. Aug. 28, 1861: Franklin's division, consisting of Kearny's and Franklin's old brigade. A third brigade added Sept. 4. Aug. 30, 1861: F. J. Porter's division, consisting of two brigades. A third brigade added Sept. 27. Sept. 12, 1861: Stone's division, consisting of two brigades, Lander's and Peck's. Baker's brigade was added towards the end of the month or early in October. Sept. 14, 1861: Buell's division, consisting of Couch's and Graham's brigades. A third brigade added early in October. Sept. 16, 1861: McCall's division; on the 25th of that month he received the last two regiments of the Pennsylvania Reserves, so that his division consisted of thirteen regiments in three brigades, under Meade, J. F. Reynolds, and Ord. Sept. 28, 1861: W. F. Smith's division, consisting of the Ver
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...