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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumter, Fort (search)
the ceremonies. When the multitude were assembled around the flag-staff, the songs of Victory at last and Rally round the flag were sung. Rev. Mr. Harris, who made the prayer at the raising of the flag over Fort Sumter, Dec. 27, 1860, now offered prayer and pronounced a blessing on the old flag. Rev. Dr. Storrs read selections from the Psalms. General Townsend read Major Anderson's despatch announcing the fall of Sumter. Then the faithful Sergeant Hart appeared with a carpet-bag containing the flag. It was attached to the halyards, when General Anderson, after a brief and touching address, hoisted it to the peak of the flag-staff amid loud huzzas, followed by singing The Star-spangled banner. Six guns on the fort were then fired, and were responded to by all the batteries that took part in the bombardment in 1861. Henry Ward Beecher, the orator of the day, pronounced an address. So, four years from the time of the evacuation of Fort Sumter it was repossessed by the government.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tilton, Theodore 1835- (search)
the College of the City of New York; employed for a year on the New York Observer; editor of the Independent in 1856-71; established the Golden age, but retired from it after two years. In 1874 he created wide-spread excitement by charging Henry Ward Beecher with unlawful intimacy with his wife. A committee of Plymouth Church, to whom the charges were referred, reported that they were groundless, but Mr. Tilton's civil suit against Mr. Beecher for $100,000 damages led to a most sensational triharging Henry Ward Beecher with unlawful intimacy with his wife. A committee of Plymouth Church, to whom the charges were referred, reported that they were groundless, but Mr. Tilton's civil suit against Mr. Beecher for $100,000 damages led to a most sensational trial and resulted in the disagreement of the jury. In 1883 Mr. Tilton went to Paris, where he afterwards resided. For many years he was a popular and successful lecturer; was an opponent of slavery and an advocate of woman's rights.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
Nov. 19, 1873 A. Oakey Hall, ex-mayor of New York, for complicity with the Tweed ring frauds; jury disagree, March 1-21, 1872; second trial, jury disagree, Nov. 1; acquitted......Dec. 24, 1873 David Swing, for heresy before the Chicago Presbytery, April 15 et seq., in twenty-eight specifications by Prof. Francis L. Patton; acquitted after a long trial......1874 [Professor Swing withdrew from the Presbyterian Church and formed an independent congregation.] Theodore Tilton v. Henry Ward Beecher, for adultery, Brooklyn, N. Y.; jury disagree; case ended......July 2, 1875 Jesse Pomeroy, the Boston boy murderer, for killing of Horace W. Millen, April 22, 1874, supposed to be Pomeroy's fourth victim......1875 Gen. O. E. Babcock, private secretary of President Grant, tried at St. Louis for complicity in whiskey frauds; acquitted......Feb. 7, 1876 W. W. Belknap, United States Secretary of War, impeached; acquitted......Aug. 1, 1876 John D. Lee, for the Mountain Meadow ma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Woman's Suffrage Convention meets in Cleveland, O. (183 delegates from sixteen States, Rev. Henry Ward Beecher president), and organizes American Woman's Suffrage Association......Nov. 24, 1869 SSt. Louis railroad bridge over the Mississippi at St. Louis opened......July 4, 1874 Rev. Henry Ward Beecher demands an investigation of Theodore Tilton's charges against him......July 7, 1874 Rev. Henry Ward Beecher acquitted by a committee of his church......Aug. 28, 1874 Headquarters of the United States army removed to St. Louis......Oct. 1, 1874 Lincoln monument at Springfield, 5 Centenary of the battle of Bunker Hill......June 17, 1875 Jury in the case of Tilton v. Beecher disagree and are discharged......July 2, 1875 Andrew Johnson, born 1808, dies near Jonesboroof trade dollars......March 3, 1887 Forty-ninth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1887 Henry Ward Beecher, stricken with apoplexy, March 2, dies in Brooklyn......March 8, 1887 James B. Eads, en
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
ngress, endorses the bogus legislature, and calls the Topeka movement revolutionary......Jan. 24, 1856 Whitfield takes his seat in Congress, and Reeder announces that he will contest it......Feb. 4, 1856 United States forces in Kansas, by order of Secretary of War, are put under requisition of the governor......Feb. 15, 1856 Free-State legislature meets at Topeka; Governor Robinson delivers his message, and A. H. Reeder and J. H. Lane are elected senators......March 4, 1856 Henry Ward Beecher sends twenty-five Bibles and twenty-five Sharp's rifles to a Connecticut party emigrating to Kansas......March 28, 1856 Topeka constitution presented in United States Senate by Lewis Cass, March 24; in the House by Daniel Mace, of Indiana......April 7, 1856 Congressional investigating committee reaches Lawrence......April 18, 1856 Sheriff Jones attempts to arrest S. N. Wood in Lawrence, charged with aiding in the rescue of Branson in November previous, but is prevented, shot a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
rant monument in New York......April 27, 1891 Charles Pratt, philanthropist, born 1830, dies at New York......May 4, 1891 School-children of the State choose the rose as State flower by a vote of: Rose, 294,816; golden-rod, 206,402; majority, 88,414......May 8, 1891 Benson John Lossing, historian, born 1813, dies at Chestnut Ridge, Dutchess county......June 3, 1891 Chauncey Vibbard, called the father of the American railway, dies at Macon, Ga.......June 5, 1891 Statue of Henry Ward Beecher unveiled at Brooklyn......June 24, 1891 Four murderers, Slocum, Smiler, Wood, and Jugiro, executed by electricity at Sing Sing......July 7, 1891 George Jones, of New York Times, born 1811, dies at New York City......Aug. 12, 1891 A train on the New York Central runs from New York to East Buffalo, 436 miles in 426 minutes running time......Sept. 14, 1891 First regular Empire State Express makes the run from New York to Buffalo in 8 hours 42 minutes......Oct. 26, 1891 Ros
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ward, John Quincy Adams 1830- (search)
Ward, John Quincy Adams 1830- Sculptor; born in Urbana, O., June 29. 1830; studied under and assisted Henry K. Browne, in 1850-57; resided in Washington, D. C., in 1850-61, where he made portrait busts of many of the public men, and in New York City since 1861. Among his statues are The Indian Hunters; 7th Regiment citizen soldiers; and The Pilgrims, all in Central Park, New York City; The Freedman, in Washington, D. C.; Henry Ward Beecher; Commodore Perry; and the crowning group of Victory on the naval arch in New York City, erected for the Dewey reception.
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