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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
mes was only one foot clear of the bottom. A shot striking the forward facing of a port shutter knocked it off. The damage done to the ship from the fire of the enemy was not material, and the opinion was expressed that at the distance of 1,000 yards the armor plating would prove invulnerable to such shot as were fired at the vessel. He expressed great admiration of the conduct of officers and men, and would fall short of his duty if he omitted to present to especial notice Lieutenant-Commander George E. Belknap, the executive officer. It is proper to note the fact that without exception the commanding officers of all of the vessels engaged spoke in the highest terms of those under their command. The names, which may be seen in the official reports, are omitted for lack of space and fear of taxing the patience of the reader. Rear-Admiral Dupont, in his several reports to the Department, states that he moved in line of battle as before given, in the New Ironsides, with seven iron
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
landing was to find a favorable depth of water and hard ground. It was only on the evening of the 17th that a satisfactory landing-place was found, and 750 men were disembarked under cover of howitzers in launches; the remainder of the force landed the following day, and took up its line of march for Charleston. As on the morning of the 18th that city was found evacuated, it does not seem necessary to note further than the return of the naval vessels and transports to Charleston. Commander Belknap, in the monitor Canonicus, lying near Moultrie, reported heavy fires in Charleston and on James Island at 1 A. M. (18th), and heavy explosions were heard. At daylight haze and smoke shut out the view. At 8 A. M. he threw two heavy shells into Moultrie, and received no reply; the Confederate flag was, however, flying over it and Castle Pinckney, and the city of Charleston also, but no movement was visible. At this time a magazine blew up in Battery Bee. The forts had been evacuate
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
threw Ix-inch shells among the enemy, causing him to withdraw immediately, leaving one disabled 30-pounder Parrott gun on the field. At 10.08 the Hunchback, which had previously grounded, was again afloat. An hour later, the revenue cutter Agassiz, the Shawsheen towed by a tug, and the Ceres were in position, but the enemy had withdrawn beyond the reach of the guns. Two light-draught gunboats followed the enemy ten miles up the river, picking up stragglers who wished to desert. Colonel Belknap, Eighty-fifth New York, wrote to the senior naval officer present as follows : When, on the 14th of March, General Pettigrew, with eighteen pieces of artillery and more than 3,000 men, made his furious assault upon Fort Anderson, an unfinished earthwork, garrisoned by 300 men of my command, the capture or destruction of the brave little band seemed inevitable. But the gunboats under your command—the pride of loyal men and the terror of traitors —came promptly to the rescue. Your well-
nes anchored as near that work as the depth of water would permit. This brought the Ironsides within one thousand yards, and the nearest monitor within seven hundred yards of the nearest guns, that were vigorously firing upon them as they anchored. The vessels proceeded to get ranges, and then to make effective practice at the guns in the fort, which, however, replied vigorously until late in the afternoon, when the heavier ships coming into line soon drove them into their bomb-proofs. Belknap's Report At daylight lines one, two, and three proceeded also to execute the duties assigned them, and soon after sunrise were anchored in lines near the beach at Half Moon battery, four miles north of Fort Fisher. Boats were at once sent to the transports, and although there was considerable swell, the work of debarkation went on vigorously and effectively. Preceding this, vessels on line No. 1 had shelled the woods back of the beach, and hundreds of cattle that had doubtless been
elloCushing1 100-pdr., rifled115440 3 30-pdrs., rifled3 2 Ix-inch shell guns144 AlabamaLangthorne2 30-pdrs., rifledNot given.000 1 Ix-inch shell guns 6 32 pdrs. MontgomeryDunn1 30-pdr., rifled192240 1 X-inch shell gun158 4 Viii-inch shell guns230 IoscoGuest2 100-pdrs., rifled2002120 4 Ix-inch shell guns358 Armor-plated vessels. New IronsidesRadford2 150-pdrs., rifled971000 2 60-pdrs., rifled 14 Xi-in. shell guns. MonadnockParrott4 Xv-inch shell guns.441000 CanonicusBelknap2 Xv-inch shell guns.297030 MahopacWeaver2 Xv-inch shell guns.153000 SaugusCalhoun2 Xv-inch shell guns.212010 Malvern (flag-ship)310 Vessels in reserve line not given. The total of killed is 74 ; wounded, 289; missing, 20. The total of shells thrown from the vessels, from which returns are in the Department, 18,716. The Brooklyn and Susquehanna probably threw 2,000, and ten smaller vessels 1,000, making a probable total of 21,716 during the second bombardment. The number of shells
ort, the, 184 Beaumont, Commander, 128 Beauregard, General G. T., proclamation of, concerning blockade at Charleston, 78 et seq., 137 Beauregard, Fort, see Fort Beauregard Bedell, Lieutenant, 63 Behm, Lieutenant C. F. W., 177, 189 Belknap, Colonel, of Eighty-fifth New York, 197 Belknap, Lieutenant-Commander George E., 100, 156 Belle, the, U. S. tug, 214 Belvidere, the, it. S. transport, 18, 33, 49 Benjamin, J. P., 16 (note) Berry, Captain, 25 Bertwistle, EnsiBelknap, Lieutenant-Commander George E., 100, 156 Belle, the, U. S. tug, 214 Belvidere, the, it. S. transport, 18, 33, 49 Benjamin, J. P., 16 (note) Berry, Captain, 25 Bertwistle, Ensign, 237 Bienville, the, U. S., 21 Black Warrior, the, 184 et seq. Blockade, proclamation concerning, 78; blockade running, 146 Blythewood, Mr., plantation of, 37 Bombshell, the, 205 et seq. Boomer, Master's Mate E., 177 Boston Navy Yard, 7 et seq. Boston, the, U. S. transport, 46, 49 et seq. Boun, Lewis, 62 Boutelle, Mr., 18, 36, 91 Bowen, Mr., bar-pilot, 220 Boyden, Master's Mate, 218 Bradford, Colonel, 170 Bradford, Mr., of the Coast Survey, 220
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