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aving been sent off early in the day, corroborating the conclusions arrived at by the commanding General, on Clark's Mountain. Accompanying this report will also be found a map of the country traversed in the operations described, drawn by Captain Blackford, my topographical engineer. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General, commanding Cavalry. Report of Major-General Stuart of operations from August 21, 1862, to expedition to Catlett's Station. hsuch circumstances successful attack by a charge, mounted, was impossible, and its further prosecution was deferred for the accomplishment of what was the great object of the expedition — the destruction of the Cedar Run railroad bridge. Captain Blackford, with a picket party, set about this arduous undertaking; but owing to the fact that everything was saturated with water, ignition was impossible. Axes were looked up in the darkness with great difficulty, and the energetic and thorough-go
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. (search)
The results of this expedition in a moral and political point of view can hardly be estimated, and the consternation among property holders in Pennsylvania beggars description. I am specially indebted to Captain B. S. White (Confederate States cavalry), and to Messrs. Hugh Logan and Harbaugh, whose skillful guidance was of immense service to me. My staff are entitled to my thanks for untiring energy in the discharge of their duties. I enclose a map of the expedition drawn by Captain W. W. Blackford to accompany this report; also a copy of orders enforced during the march. Believing that the hand of God was clearly manifested in the signal deliverance of my command from danger, and the crowning success attending it, I ascribe to Him the praise, the honor and the glory. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General Commanding Cavalry. [The following letters from General Lee will be appropriate addenda to General Stuart
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
tinctly heard the rapid and continued discharges of cannon which announced the engagement of Gen. A. P. Hill with the extreme right of the enemy. Gen. Stuart, in his official report, says: — At Dr. Shelton's we awaited the arrival of Gen. Jackson, sending a squadron in advance to seize and hold the bridge at the Totopotomoy. The enemy, anticipating us, had torn up the bridge, and held the opposite bank, and obstructed the road, without, however, making any determined stand. Capt. W. W. Blackford, Corps of Engineers, assigned to duty with my command, set about repairing the bridge, and in a half-hour, with the details furnished him, the bridge was ready. Passing Pole Green Church, Gen. Jackson's march led directly toward the crossing of Beaver Dam Creek opposite Richardson's. Reaching that point he bivouacked for the night. Gen. Trimble, in his official report, writes: — On the 26th we moved, with the army, from Ashland in a southerly direction, passing to the east o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An independent scout. (search)
men were sent out and captured him. Upon questioning him, he told us of Captain Jones and his command; at the time it was not believed, but in less than an hour it was found to be too true. The men had hardly got in with the Yankee, before Captain Blackford, an independent officer, and about half a dozen of his men who had been flushed by Jones, rode into our camp and informed us that the Yankees were right at hand. By some means we were under the impression that there were about sixty of th attacked us, capture d Bonham before he could mount his horse, recaptured Jones, and after chasing Craton and myself nearly a mile captured Craton, I alone being left to tell the tale. But the adventures of the main party must be told. Captain Blackford and our men drove the force, under the immediate command of Jones, in confusion before them to the main street of the town, and there, much to their astonishment, met about a hundred troops drawn up in reserve. Without hesitating at all, t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Stuart's expedition into Pennsylvania. (search)
e North. One or two of my men lost their way and are probably in the hands of the enemy. The results of this expedition in a moral and political point of view can hardly be estimated, and the consternation among property holders in Pennsylvania beggars description I am especially indebted to Captain B S. White, South Carolina cavalry, and to Mr.——, and Mr.——, whose skillful guidance was of immense service to me. My staff are entitled to my thanks for untiring energy in the discharge of their duties. I enclose a map of the expedition drawn by Captain W. W. Blackford, to accompany this report. Also, a copy of orders enforced during the march. Believing that the hand of God was clearly manifested in the signal deliverance of my command from danger, and the crowning success attending it, I ascribe to Him the praise, the honor, and the glory. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) J. E. B. Stuart, Major General Commanding C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of Company D. First regiment Virginia Cavalry, C. S. A. (search)
wounded. John G. White, wounded. William White. R. C. Williams, killed. A. H. Webb. William B. White, dead. C. M. Waldon. A committee had been appointed to write to General Fitz. Lee, Colonel W. A. Morgan (the last colonel of the regiment), Colonel W. W. Blackford, the second captain of the company, and Colonel John S. Mosby, who went into the war as a private of the company, and remained in it about one year. Letters were read from General Lee, Colonel Morgan, and Colonel Blackford. No reply was received from Colonel Mosby, who, it is presumed, did not receive the invitation in time to reply before the day named. These letters and replies were read by Hon. C. F. Trigg: Abingdon, June 13, 1892. General Fitzhugh Lee, Glasgow, Va.: dear Sir—There is to be a reunion of the survivors of Company D, First Virginia Cavalry, at this place on July 4th, and I have been directed to notify you of the fact, and extend to you a cordial and pressing invitation to be pr
h. One or two of my men lost their way, and are probably in the hands of the enemy. The results of this expedition, in a moral and political point of view, can hardly be estimated, and the consternation among property holders in Pennsylvania beggars description. I am specially indebted to Captain B. S. White, (C. S., cavalry,) and to Mr.--and Mr. --,whose skillful guidance was of Immense service to me.--My staff are entitled to my thanks for untiring energy in the discharge of their duties. I enclose a map of the expedition, drawn by Captain W. W. Blackford, to accompany this report, also, a copy of orders enforced during the march. Believing that the hand of God was clearly manifested in the signal deliverance of my command from danger, and the crowing success attending it, I ascribe to Him the praise, the house, and the glory. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant. (Signed.) J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General Commanding Cavalry.
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