hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 1 1 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 480 results in 95 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbitration, international. (search)
or more friendly powers had been invoked. The treaty was to remain in force five years. The failure of the treaty does not mean that the United States is averse to arbitration as a means of settling national difficulties. This country has always been foremost in that line. But circumstances were against the measure at that time. At the very moment Great Britain was negotiating the treaty with the United States, her war-ships were firing upon the patriots of Crete. One of the great forces in the United States in favor of arbitration is the International Peace Society, originally formed in England. Its first great convention was held in London in 1851. The submission of the Venezuelan question to arbitration marked the eighteenth question that had thus been disposed of by the United States and the twenty-sixth that England had thus submitted. See Bering sea arbitration; arbitration, tribunal of, for Alabama claims ; Venezuela and Cleveland, Grover for Venezuela arbitration, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
was suspected of favoring King James II, after the Revolution, and was outlawed for treason in Ireland, although he was never in that country. The outlawry was reversed by William and Mary in 1691. Charles Lord Baltimore was thrice married, and died in London, Feb. 24, 1714. Iv. Benedict Leonard Calvert, fourth Lord Baltimore, Succeeded his father, Charles, in 1714. In 1698 he married Lady Charlotte Lee, daughter of the Earl of Lichfield (granddaughter of the notorious Duchess of Cleveland, the favorite mistress of Charles II.), from whom he was divorced in 1705. Benedict publicly abjured the Roman Catholic faith in 1713, and died in 1715, only thirteen months after the death of his father. V. Charles Calvert ii., son of Benedict, and the fifth Lord Baltimore, Was born Sept. 29. 1699, and was an infant in law when he succeeded to his father's title. In July, 1730, he married the widow Mary Janssen, youngest daughter of Gen. Theodore Janssen. His life was spent chief
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bayard, Thomas Francis, 1828-1898 (search)
and was for a while president pro tem. of the Senate. In 1880 and 1884 Senator Bayard's prominence in the party brought his name before the National Democratic Convention, but he failed of securing the prize, though receiving many votes. President Cleveland called him in 1885 to the office of Secretary of State, where he remained until 1889, and in President Cleveland's second administration he was first minister and then ambassador (q. v.) to Great Britain. He died in Dedham, Mass., Sept. 2for a while president pro tem. of the Senate. In 1880 and 1884 Senator Bayard's prominence in the party brought his name before the National Democratic Convention, but he failed of securing the prize, though receiving many votes. President Cleveland called him in 1885 to the office of Secretary of State, where he remained until 1889, and in President Cleveland's second administration he was first minister and then ambassador (q. v.) to Great Britain. He died in Dedham, Mass., Sept. 28, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bering sea. (search)
e justice of this claim, hut after another year of seal slaughter, agreed to submit the claim to arbitration In July, 1896, Judge G. E. King, of Canada, and Judge W. E. Putnam, of the United States, were chosen commissioners to settle the matter. On Jan. 14, 1898. President McKinley submitted to Congress the report and awards of the commission, the last aggregating $473,151 in favor of Great Britain, and on June 14 Congress appropriated that amount. In the mean time (June, 189)6) President Cleveland appointed a commission to make an exhaustive study of the fur-seal question, and on its report (1897) president McKinley appointed a new commission to devise protection for the seals. Then efforts were made to induce Great Britain to consent to an international conference, but Canada objected to the representation of Russia and Japan, whom the United States had invited, and on this objection Great Britain declined. Subsequently the United States invited all interested nations to a c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bering sea arbitration. (search)
and negotiations which resulted in the arbitration at Paris. These seizures were the act of the administration of President Cleveland. and had the endorsement of the executive, politico-judicial. and legislative departments of that administrationure of all British vessels engaged in pelagic sealing in Bering Sea. But this course had already been proposed to President Cleveland, and decided to be improper. The Hon. E. J. Phelps who, as minister to Great Britain, had conducted the negotiatis in the Senate of the party whose officials had originated the subject-matter of arbitration. Hon. E. J. Phelps, President Cleveland's minister in London, an experienced diplomatist, and a lawyer of national repute, had been consulted by the Presied French scholar and a prominent jurist, was added to the list. These three gentlemen were the political friends of Mr. Cleveland. With them was joined a single party friend o(f President Harrison, H. W. Blodgett, for many years a distinguished ju
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bissell, Wilson Shannon, (search)
Bissell, Wilson Shannon, Lawyer: horn in New London, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1847; was graduated at Yale College in 1869; became a law partner of Grover Cleveland; and was Postmaster-General in 1893-95.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893 (search)
w, the leaders, were set aside for Hayes. In 1880 Grant and Blaine were the candidates respectively of the two great wings of the party, and again a dark horse, Garfield, was selected. President Garfield appointed Senator Blaine Secretary of State, which post he resigned in December, 1881, soon after the accession of President Arthur. In 1884 Mr. Blaine received the Presidential nomination on the fourth ballot. An extraordinary campaign followed between his adherents and those of Gov. Grover Cleveland, the Democratic candidate, and the election turned on the result in New York, which was lost to Mr. Blaine by 1,047 votes. The defection of the Mugwumps, the vote of the Prohibitionists, and the fatal Rum, Romanism, and, rebellion utterance of Dr. Burchard, have all been assigned as causes of his defeat. Mr. Blaine then resumed his literary work and published his Twenty years of Congress, in 2 volumes, and in James Gillespie Blaine. 1888 positively declined the use of his name fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blount, James H., 1837- (search)
, 1837- Legislator; born in Macon, Ga., Sept. 12. 1837. He was elected to Congress as a Democrat in 1872, and held his seat till 1893, when he declined a renomination. At the conclusion of his last term the House suspended its proceedings that his associates might formally testify their appreciation of his worth. In his last term he was chairman of the committee on foreign affairs, a post that gave him a wide knowledge of American relations with other countries. In March, 1893, President Cleveland appointed him a special commissioner to visit Honolulu and report on the conditions which led to the overthrow of the kingdom of Hawaii and the establishment of an American protectorate over the islands. The first result of his investigations was an order to remove the American flag from the government house, and for the withdrawal of American marines from Honolulu. These actions created much excitement in the United States, and led to the resignation of Minister Stevens, the appoi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carlisle, John Griffin 1835- (search)
both as a lawyer and politician. Having gained experience in both houses of the Kentucky legislature, and served as lieutenant-governor from 1871 to 1875, he entered the national House of Representatives in 1877 as Democratic member from his native State. In Congress he became rapidly one of the most notable and influential figures, especially on financial and commercial matters. He was a member of the Ways and Means Committee, and was recognized as one of the ablest debaters and leaders in the movement for revenue reform. When his party obtained control of the House in 1883, Carlisle, as the candidate of the revenue-reform wing of the Democrats, received the nomination and election to the office of Speaker. He was twice re-elected, serving until 1889. From 1890 to 1893 he was United States Senator. On March 4, 1893, he left the Senate to enter President Cleveland's second cabinet as Secretary of the Treasury, and on retiring therefrom settled in New York City to practise law.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chamberlain, Joseph 1836- (search)
orn in London, England, in 1836; educated at the University College School, in London: and was mayor of Birmingham in 1870-75. He was elected to Parliament from Birmingham as a Liberal Unionist in 1875, and has since held his seat; was president of the Board of Trade in Joseph Chamberlain. 1880-85; president of the Local Government Board in 1886; one of the British commissioners to settle the North American fisheries dispute in 1887, and lord rector of Glasgow University. In 1895 he became Secretary of State for the Colonies, and has since held the post. During 1898, and especially when the international troubles concerning China were thickening, he made several notable speeches, voicing a widespread sentiment in Great Britain that there should be a closer understanding between the United States and Great Britain touching their various commercial interests. In 1888 he married Mary, daughter of William C. Endicott, Secretary of War in President Cleveland's first administration.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...