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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
um, and Mr. Owen; met the committee on the Ballot at their rooms in the city; heard Roebuck open his motion in the Commons for the abolition of the lord lieutenancy of Ireland; dined with Mr. Parkes, where I met Mr. Sparks Jared Sparks. and Miss Cushman. Charlotte Cushman, the actress. July 8. Dinner at Earl Fortescue's, where was a large and distinguished company; afterwards to the Russian Ambassador's, where I met Lord and Lady Palmerston and Lord Stanhope. July 9. House of CommonCharlotte Cushman, the actress. July 8. Dinner at Earl Fortescue's, where was a large and distinguished company; afterwards to the Russian Ambassador's, where I met Lord and Lady Palmerston and Lord Stanhope. July 9. House of Commons; dinner with Sir Edward Buxton. July 10. Breakfast at Lord Hatherton's; attended debate in the House of Lords on the Jews' bill; heard Lords Granville, Derby, Lyndhurst, Brougham, Dufferin, Argyll, the Bishops of London and Oxford, and the Archbishop of Canterbury; went late to a party at Stafford House. July 11. Invited by the Reform Club as honorary member; already invited also by Traveller's; made calls; dined at Lord Belper's, where I met for the first time Macaulay, so altered I di
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ican drama or in the native subject. Edwin Forrest (1806-1872) encouraged the Philadelphia group of writers, See Book II, Chap. II. but the topics chosen by Bird, Conrad, Stone, Smith, Miles, and Boker were largely in accord with English romantic models. Stone's Metamora; or, the last of the Wampanoags spoke the language of James Sheridan Knowles; Boker's Francesca da Rimini reflected the accents of the Elizabethans. Forrest, therefore, encouraged the American drama indirectly. Charlotte Cushman (1816-1876) never even went so far, though her friendship with Bryant, R. H. Stoddard, Sidney Lanier, together with the esteem in which she was held by all intellectual America, would show that she was not aloof from the life of the time. One looks in vain through the repertories of the great actors for that encouragement of the American drama which it most needed as an infant industry. Edwin Booth (1833-1893) at the time the assassination of Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth, 14 April,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ward, 461 Cross, Marian Evans, 6, 97, 99, 103, 105 Cross, W. L., 303 Crothers, Rachel, 286, 295 Cruising in the Caribbees, 165 Crumbling Idols, 92 Cudworth, 228 Culture's Garland, 28 Cummins, Maria S., 69 Curiosities of the American Theatre, 273 Curtis, George Ticknor, 348 Curtis, George William. 60, 83, 100, 110 113-116, 118, 163, 309, 313, 326, 353, 354, 415, 417, 488 Curtius, Ernst, 460, 462, 463 Cushing, Caleb, 144 Cushing, Frank H., 159, 615, 610, 622 Cushman, Charlotte, 268 Custer, Elizabeth Bacon, 160 Custer, G. A., 159 Cycle of Cathay, a, 155 Cygne ou Mingo, 592 Daffy-down-dilly, 416 Daily news (Chicago), 328, 334 Daily news (London), 326 Daily Sentinel, the, 405 Daisy Miller, 99, 103 Dakolar, 277 Dalcour, 596 Dall, W. H., 166 Daly, Augustin, 267, 268, 270, 271, 272, 275 Damnation of Theron Ware, the, 92 Dana, Charles A., 121, 122, 164, 182, 324, 331 Dana, J. D, 477 Dana, R. H., 139 Danbury [Conn.] News,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 24 (search)
person, of nobler type, appears but imperfectly in my letters, namely, Miss Charlotte Cushman. I find, to be sure, the following penetrating touches from a companion who had always that quality, and who says of Miss Cushman, in her diary: She is very large, looks like an elderly man, with gray hair and very red cheeks — full ofexpectation was fulfilled, and I find that the same authority later compared Miss Cushman in appearance to an old boy given to eating apples and snowballing ; and, again, gave this description after seeing Miss Cushman's new house: The wildest turn of an insane kaleidoscope — the petrified antics of a crazy coon --with a dance of I remember that once, as we were driving across the first beach at Newport, Miss Cushman looked with delight across the long strip of sand, which the advancing wavesh she was long haunted. Again, I remember at one fashionable reception how Miss Cushman came with John Gilbert, the veteran actor, as her guest, and how much higher
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors, Helen Jackson. ( H. H. ) (search)
6. As the most artistic among her verses I should class the Gondolieds, in which all Venice seems reflected in the movement and cadence, while the thought is fresh and new and strong. Then there are poems which seem to hold all secrets of passion trembling on the lips, yet forbear to tell them; and others, on a larger scale, which have a grander rhythmical movement than most of our poets have dared even to attempt. Of these the finest, to my ear, is Resurgam; but I remember that Charlotte Cushman preferred the Funeral March, and loved to read it in public. Those who heard her can never forget the solemnity with which she recited those stately cadences, or the grandeur of her half-glance over the shoulder as she named first among the hero's funeral attendants Majestic death, his freedman, following. H. H. reaches the popular heart best in a class of poems easy to comprehend, thoroughly human in sympathy; poems of love, of motherhood, of bereavement; poems such as are r
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
and a number of years elapsed between the completion of the play and his first reading of it. At last the time seemed ripe for the production of the play. E. L. Davenport, the actor manager of the Howard Athenaeum, agreed to produce it: Charlotte Cushman was to play Phaedra to Booth's Hippolytus. Rehearsals began, the author's dream seemed close upon fulfilment. Then came a slip never fully explained: the manager suddenly discovered that the subject of the play was a painful one; other reasons were given, but none that appeared sufficient to author or actors. My dear, said Miss Cushman, if Edwin Booth and I had done nothing more than stand upon the stage and say good evening to each other, the house would have been filled. Briefly, the play was withdrawn. Our mother says: This was, I think, the greatest let down that I ever experienced. It affected me seriously for some days, after which I determined to attempt nothing more for the stage. She never forgot the play nor
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
became positively scenes of revelry; and the anxious guardian below, warding off would-be interviewers or suppliants, might be embarrassed to hear peals of laughter ringing down the stair. Early in May she has young J. W. Hurlburt to dine; a pleasant young playwright, grandson to General Hurlburt of the Civil War.... I had lent my play of Hippolytus to young Hurlburt to read. He brought it back yesterday with so much praise of parts of it as to revive the pang which I felt when, Charlotte Cushman and Edwin Booth having promised to fill the principal parts, the manager's wife suddenly refused to fill her part, and the whole fell through. This with much other of my best literary work has remained a dead letter on my own shelves. I am glad as well as sad to feel that it deserved better treatment. She had a wheel-chair, and on pleasant days it was her delight to be wheeled through the Public Garden, now in full May beauty, to see the flowers and the children. She was able to
Terry, Louisa. Crawford, Thomas, I, 41, 95, 115; II, 55, 389. Crete, I, 260-62, 264, 275-77, 278, 287; II, 43, 44. 225, 394. Crimea, I, 294. Crimean War, II, 189. Critic, N. Y., II, 66. Crothers, S. McC., II, 320. Crusaders, II, 15. Cuba, I, 173, 176, 177, 326. Cuckson, Mr., II, 203. Cumberland Lakes, I, 92. Curiel, Seflor, I, 324. Curtis, G. W., I, 143, 159, 160; II, 93. Letter of, II, 147. Cushing, Mr., II, 74, 75. Cushing, Louisa, I, 227. Cushman, Charlotte, I, 204, I, 345. Cutler, B. C., Sr., I, 10, 13, 17. Cutler, B. C., 2d, I, 27, 28, 38, 39, 107; II, 222, 364. Cutler, Eliza, see Francis. Cutler, John, I, 10, 12. Cutler, Julia, see Ward. Cutler, Louisa, see McAllister. Cutler, Sarah M. H., I, 10, 12, 13, 17, 39, 40, 42; II, 319. Cyclades, I, 272. Cyprus, II, 42. Czerwinsk, II, 12, 13, 14. Dana, R. H., Jr., I, 226. D'Annunzio, II, 285. Dante, Alighieri, I, 174, 330; II, 26, 27, 120, 357. Dantzi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
, July 3, 1857. Dearest wife,—I am here safe in gentle Ellen's Mrs. Twisleton. kind care. I wish I could add that I am easy in my thoughts. . . . . I want to know every hour how you are. I want to seem to do something for you . . . . I wish heartily, half the time, that I had never left the Arago, and sometimes think that the storm in which I escaped over the side of that vessel was a sort of warning to me not to leave it. But there is no use in all this; rather harm. . . . . We Miss Cushman and Miss Stebbins were his companions on this journey to London. did not reach Southampton till the five-o'clock train had been gone ten minutes. So we made ourselves comfortable, with a mutton-chop and a cup of tea, at an excellent inn there, and at fifteen minutes past seven took the next train, reached London at ten, and Rutland Gate at half past. Ellen and the Lyells had waited for me till half past 9, and then giving up all hope of me, they went to their respective parties. . . .
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
he U. S. Supreme Court, 401, 426 and note, 445 note, 457; letter to, 402 and note. Curtis, C. P., I. 316 note. Curtis, Eliza, wife of W. H. Woodward, I. 4, 7, 276. Curtis, George Ticknor, I. 4, 317, II. 244, 254, 287, 326, 488, 493; letter to G. S. Hillard, I. 326, 391, II. 187, 402 note; letters to, II. 222, 225, 231, 277, 327, 457, 459, 461, 469, 485. Curtis, Harriet, I. 4. Curtis, Mrs. T. B., II. 76 note. Curtis, Rev., Philip, I. 3. Curtis, T. B., I. 316 note. Cushman, Miss, Charlotte, I. 357 note. Custis, Miss Nellie (Mrs. Peter), I. 38. Cuvier, Baron, I. 255. Czartoryski, Prince, II. 113. D Dahl, J. C. C., I. 482, 490. Dalbiack, Sir, Charles, II. 179. Dallas, G. M., II. 372. Dallas, Report, I. 30. Dalton, Mr., I. 422. Dana, Richard H., poet, letter to, II. 74-76. Dante, study of, I. 85, 86, 394, 466, 470, 472, 475 and note, 482, II. 69, 201, 480 and note. D'Appony, Count, II 19, 111, 114. Dartmouth College, case of, vs. Woodward
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