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The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
, as treasurer, in the chair. My health was proposed, to which I replied. At Lady Hatherton's request he wrote out his remarks concerning Lord Denman, and the manuscript was sent to Mrs. Edward Cropper, daughter of Lord Denman. Afterwards went to Mr. Procter's (Barry Cornwall's); afterwards to Cosmopolitan Club, where I met Thackeray and others. July 2. Lunch at Argyll Lodge; the Argylls took me to Professor Owen in Richmond Park; dinner with Mr. Ellice, where I met Mr. Dallas George M. Dallas, United States Minister. and family. July 3. Lunch at Stafford House, where was Dr. Whewell, Master of Trinity; visited House of Commons and House of Lords; dined with Mr. Stirling, Sir William Stirling Maxwell. 1818-1878. He married Mrs. Norton in 1877, and both died within a year after their marriage. Ante, vol. II. p. 61. where were Lord Lansdowne, Mr. Ellice., Lady Molesworth, and Mrs. Norton, as beautiful as ever; afterwards to a party at Lord Kinnaird's, Ninth Baron.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
now, but at any rate, as there was nothing else to do, he took his departure, withdrew the soldiers, and we were left to life, liberty, and something to eat. Visit from General Meade. Of a different kind, and far more pleasant is the last thing I shall put down in these reminiscences. More pleasant because it relates to a visit we had from General George C. Meade. My mother, who still lives a vigorous old lady—though she doesn't think so—of 80 years, was a daughter of the late George M. Dallas, Vice-President under Mr. Polk, and was related to or connected by marriage with General Meade. They had known each other well before the war, but, of course, had not seen each other since it began, as my mother was all the while in Richmond. One morning we were much surprised, and, indeed, somewhat startled, by seeing a very distinguished-looking man, wearing the insignia of a United States general, stop and dismount before our front door. He was accompanied, I think, by his staff,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
now, but at any rate, as there was nothing else to do, he took his departure, withdrew the soldiers, and we were left to life, liberty, and something to eat. Visit from General Meade. Of a different kind, and far more pleasant is the last thing I shall put down in these reminiscences. More pleasant because it relates to a visit we had from General George C. Meade. My mother, who still lives a vigorous old lady—though she doesn't think so—of 80 years, was a daughter of the late George M. Dallas, Vice-President under Mr. Polk, and was related to or connected by marriage with General Meade. They had known each other well before the war, but, of course, had not seen each other since it began, as my mother was all the while in Richmond. One morning we were much surprised, and, indeed, somewhat startled, by seeing a very distinguished-looking man, wearing the insignia of a United States general, stop and dismount before our front door. He was accompanied, I think, by his staff,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ant, 9. Shiloh, Battle of, 357. Slaves, General Cleburne's plan to put into the army, 173; Extension of territory for 18. Squirrel Level Fort, 289. Stephens, A. H., his fidelity and acumen, 185. Stuart, General J. E. B., 169; how killed, 227, 335. Surratt, Mrs., Execution of, 122. Taylor, Governor Robert L., 361. Toney, Marcus B., 193 Toombs, General Robert 346. Torpedo boats, David, 292, Holland, of C. S. Navy, 293. Thomas, L. B., 223. Tucker, Beverley, 160; Rev. Dallas, 153. Virginia, Advisory Council of War in 1861, 364; Officers of 1st Regiment infantry, 364; 26th Infantry, company G, Roll of, 210; how she supplied Maryland with arms, 163. Wallace, Charles Montriou, 366. War 1861-5, how conducted by the Federals, 101; unrestricted license to burn and plunder, 111; private property destroyed by, 123; spoils, how divided. 114; order of General Lee at Chambersburn, 119; London Times on the, 121; Sewards bell, 122; conduct of Confederates at Gettysb
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Death of a Survivor of the Groton massacre. (search)
The Mission to England. --Massachusetts seems to have been highly favored in the past few years, in the honor of representing our country at the Court of St. James. In the last twenty years, without referring to the period anterior to that, she has had there Edward Everett, George Bancroft, and Abbott Lawrence. Pennsylvania has been equally favored in that time, for she has sent three Ministers to the same Court — Joseph R. Ingersoll, James Buchanan, and George M. Dallas.
Arrival of the steamer America.further from Europe.return of Hon. George M. Dallas--Debate in the English House of Lords on the blockade. The steamer America with dates to the 19th arrived at Halifax on the 30th of May, from Liverpool. The America has over $1,000,000 in specie. Hon. Geo. Mr. Dallas, late U. S. Minister to England, is a passenger. The steamer City of Washington had arrived out. The Hibernian had put back to Liverpool, with damaged machinery. The North Mr. Dallas, late U. S. Minister to England, is a passenger. The steamer City of Washington had arrived out. The Hibernian had put back to Liverpool, with damaged machinery. The North Briton took her place, sailing on the 18th. The Galway contract has been annulled, but the boat will continue to run. Mr. Adams, the new Ambassador, had been presented at Court. In the House of Lords the Earl of Elleuborough asked the Government whether the term "lawful blockade," in the proclamation, was to be interpreted literally or with qualifications, as according to the strict meaning of the Paris agreement, it was impossible to maintain an effective blockade. He complaine
, the chief justice's oath of office. The commission from the President, countersigned by the Secretary of State, was then read by the clerk, the new Chief Justice took his place in the centre of the bench, and the installation was over. The ordinary business of the court forthwith began, and the crowd immediately dispersed. I overheard a gallant officer remark: "Well, there is a solid block of New England granite placed in its proper position." Miscellaneous. Ex-Vice-President George M. Dallas died in Philadelphia on Saturday, aged seventy-one years. He had been minister to England and St. Petersburg, and in 1813 he accompanied the distinguished Albert Gallatin as secretary to St. Petersburg when the offices of the Emperor of Russia were tendered to bring about a peace. A spy was recently captured near City Point, upon whose person elaborate drawings and descriptive sketches of our defences in this locality were found. It is stated that, when taken, he was on h
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