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To the President of the United States. Gen. Fremont, in his testimony before the Committee on tl at St. Louis. Adj. Gen. Harding, whom Gen. Fremont found, by appointment of Gen. Lyon, in practical command at St. Louis, says: Gen. Fremont was not inattentive to the situation of Gen. Lyondid not see fit to await the fulfillment of Gen. Fremont's programme. Though abandoned by McCullochand two others from that point to Lexington. Fremont, pressed on every side, thus responded by tel Our loss was 40 killed and 120 wounded. Gen. Fremont, who had good reason to believe that Sturgins were destined to be signally dispelled. Gen. Fremont moved southward immediately thereafter, realead you. Let the watchword be, The Union and Fremont! Draw sabers! By the right flank — quick trht, and the command was turned over to him by Fremont. It does not seem that their advices of thhe uncontested ascendency of our cause, under Fremont, had temporarily stilled. The Secession stro[18 more...]
reports injurious to the United States soldiers in Missouri. Is there a Senator here, a citizen of this land, who will say that the slightest color of authority exists on the part of a military officer for depriving a citizen of liberty or property without a warrant of law, or to suppress the freedom of the press? And we are told by the same despatch that the proprietors of the paper submitted, and intended to make an appeal. To whom? To the judicial authorities? No, sir, but to Major-General Fremont, when he should reach St. Louis. The civil authorities of the country are paralyzed, and practical martial law is being established all over the land. The like never happened in this country before, and it would not be tolerated in any country in Europe which pretends to the elements of civilization and liberty. George Washington carried the thirteen colonies through the war of the Revolution without martial law. The President of the United States could not conduct the Government
ted for the inhuman outrages perpetrated in Missouri, under the countenance of the brutal proclamations issued by the Lincoln leaders, Lyon, Curtis, Pope, and others, I will give at least this assurance, that, expecting better things from Major-General Fremont, the State authorities will doubtless afford him an early opportunity of determining whether the war is hereafter to be conducted by his forces and partisans in accordance with civilized usages. The shooting of women and children, the finott, Mr. Bass, and other distinguished citizens, the murder of Dr. Palmer, the summary shooting of unarmed men in North Missouri, without the form even of drum-head court-martial, and many other transactions sanctioned or left unpunished by General Fremont's predecessors, are barbarities which would disgrace even Camanches. If like acts cannot hereafter be prevented by motives of humanity, considerations of an enlightened military policy may be awakened in him by the retaliation which, in sub
Doc. 153.-Gen. Fremont's expedition. St. Louis, Aug. 1. Unusual interest has been created by the unwonted military activity which has followed the arrival of Major-General Fremont in St. Louis. Regiments have been constantly arriving, the city has been fairly thronged with troops; eight steamboats have been preparing fMajor-General Fremont in St. Louis. Regiments have been constantly arriving, the city has been fairly thronged with troops; eight steamboats have been preparing for their transportation down the river, and on last evening there were strong indications that the great fleet was about to move. The commanding general of this department has not seen proper to inform the public accurately beforehand with respect to the precise objects of his enterprise, plans of his campaign, or date of the depa Empress, moved into the landing. At eleven o'clock last night, the fleet and embarked troops remained awaiting complete readiness and orders to start. Major-General Fremont and staff went on board the City of Alton, to accompany and direct the expedition. Captain Bart Able is in charge of the fleet. The captains of the sever
ut the State--such as arresting citizens who have neither taken up arms against the Government, nor aided those who are in open hostility to it, and searching private houses without any reasonable ground to suspect the occupants of any improper conduct, and unnecessarily seizing or injuring private property. Such acts must be, and will be, discountenanced, and there is every reason to believe, from a general order recently issued by Lieut.-Gen. Scott, and from the known disposition of Maj.-Gen. Fremont, whose command embraces Missouri, that such oppressive conduct on the part of the military will, in a short time, be arrested. There exists in many parts of the State a most unfortunate and unnatural condition of feeling among citizens, amounting to actual hostility, and leading often to scenes of violence and bloodshed; and even neighbors of the same race have come to regard each other as enemies. This feeling, too, has originated in questions of a political character, although th
le of Wilson's Creek, Mo. this battle is variously known as that of Wilson's Creek, Springfield, and oak hill. General Fremont's report. Headquarters Western Department, St. Louis, August 13, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend:-- Gen. Lyon, in e continued his retreat upon Rolla, bringing off his baggage trains and $250,000 in specie from the Springfield Bank. J. C. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. Report of Major Sturgis. Headquarters, Army of the West, Camp Carey Gratz, near R a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The off of the Government. V. This order will be read at the head of every company in this Department. By order of Major-General Fremont. J. C. Kelton, Assistant Adjutant-General. A rebel shout of exultation. The victory in Missouri is glori
s is a just reward for the thirty-five men and children butchered by him on the 10th of May in St. Louis. I will furnish you a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The official reports of the commanding officers of the forces engaged in the battle near Springfield, Mo., having been received, thet distinguished for important services and marked gallantry, will be communicated to the War Department for the consideration of the Government. V. This order will be read at the head of every company in this Department. By order of Major-General Fremont. J. C. Kelton, Assistant Adjutant-General. A rebel shout of exultation. The victory in Missouri is gloriously confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney is killed, and Southwestern Missour
Doc. 18. Gen. Fremont's proclamation. Headquarters Western Department. St. Louis, Aug. 30, 1ciation of the proclamation just uttered by Gen. Fremont, we quote the following from the columns of simulated alarm in the following clause of Gen. Fremont's proclamation: The property, real anno exception. As the declaration of Major-General Fremont is expressly restricted in its applicair persons or property. The declaration of Gen. Fremont under this head, however construed, would mwe condemn and regret the proclamation of General Fremont establishing martial law in Missouri and ecessity. It has not come too soon, and as Gen. Fremont has it now in his power to enforce his common, and peace will again be restored to us. Gen. Fremont tells us that the outrages hitherto committases, and the understanding between him and Gen. Fremont is too cordial to admit of the supposition udiated by those higher in authority than General Fremont. We must say, however, that the devotees[3 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
e Guards were marching from Lexington to Warrensburg, to rob the bank in that place, and plunder and arrest the citizens of Johnson County, in accordance with General Fremont's proclamation and instructions. Although my men were greatly fatigued by several days' continuous and rapid marching, I determined to press forward so as tos only the week previous to the arrival of Col. Mulligan, holding their session in the Court House, whence Claib. fulminated a proclamation counter to that of Gen. Fremont. When this worthy body prudently retired before the Federal troops, they did so in such haste that eight hundred thousand dollars in gold coin, and the State a heart for every fate. If we had reinforcements now, this rebel army would be in our power. We could both rout and destroy them. It is a great pity that Gen. Fremont has not sent forward more men. If we are finally beaten it will rest upon him, not us. I now reiterate, that this war could be speedily closed if they would pi
Doc. 106. Zagonyi's charge at Springfield, October 25, 1861. Fremont's report. Headquarters in the field, near Hamansville, Mo., Oct. 26, 1861. Capt. McKet such brilliant bravery I have never seen and did not expect. Their war cry, Fremont and the Union, broke forth like thunder. Charles Zagonyi, Major Commanding Bodjutant-General, Springfield, Missouri: sir: According to the order of Major-General Fremont, I left the camp south of the Pomme de Terre River on Thursday the 24th accomplish so much in the face of such a fearful disadvantage. At the cry of Fremont and Union, which was raised at every charge, they dashed forward repeatedly in 1861. Major White's report. Springfield, October 30, 1861. Major-General Fremont: On the 24th inst., after my return with my command, one hundred and fior six times as large as was supposed prior to leaving the Headquarters of General Fremont. Notwithstanding all this, the undaunted Major resolved to press on and e
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