Your search returned 185 results in 54 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Georgia Infantry. (search)
Little Levels, who will render efficient aid. I now scout to the blockade, and this company from the Little Levels, when organized, promises to scout beyond. I have adopted vigorous measures to bring in the absentees, and expect to have them all in in a few days. The two cavalry companies number seventy-two men fit for duty. The two infantry companies number forty-one men fit for duty. In all, I have now one hundred and thirteen men fit for for duty. I suppose the two companies from Colonel Goode's regiment will increase my force one hundred. When the absentees fit for duty are in I will have about forty more. My force then will be about two hundred and fifty. This force I regard insufficient for complete defense and to restore confidence. Although this county is one of those included in the bogus government, I do not expect the enemy to attempt any permanent occupation this winter, as they would be too far from their supplies. Yet they may, if a small force is left here, se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
alker, Joseph Parkinson, R. F. Vaughan, H. Clay Chamblin, John Gilliam, J. A. Lipscomb; U. S. Senator John H. Reagan, Hon. Charles T. O'Ferrall, Gen. D. A. Weisiger, Capt. C. F. M. Spotswood, C. S. Navy, Capt. R. B. Pegram, Gen. L. S. Baker, Hon. John Goode, Gen. H. H. Walker, Captains John Taylor Wood, John M. Booker, W. H. Murdaugh, and J. W. Pegram, Lt.-Gov. J. Hoge Tyler, Mayor J. Taylor Ellyson, Gen. B. D. Fry, Hon. J. W. Daniel. Guests. Among the guests who rode in open carriages we Fauntleroy, General W. H. F. Lee, Reverend Doctor Minnigerode, Senator Butler of South Carolina, Honorable C. T. O'Ferrall, General Joseph R. Anderson, General Jubal A. Early, Colonel Thomas Smith of Virginia, Senators Daniel and Barbour, Honorable John Goode, General Fitzhugh Lee, Rev. Dr. Moses D. Hoge, Speaker Cardwell, Mayor J. Taylor Ellyson, General W. B. Taliaferro of Virginia, Captain R. E. Lee, ex-Governor John Lee Carroll, of Maryland, Senator Randall Lee Gibson of Louisiana, General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
f discussion in the near future. The venerable John Janney presided; Henry A. Wise, John Tyler, James Marshall, Summers, Goode, Jack Thornton, and Jubal Early were on the floor. Early Championed the Union. John Goode was the fire-eater of theJohn Goode was the fire-eater of the Convention, and he and rugged Jubal Early, the devoted champion of the Union, frequently locked horns in debate. One day Goode insulted Early. The latter quietly took his seat, but every one knew that the matter would not stop there. That eveninGoode insulted Early. The latter quietly took his seat, but every one knew that the matter would not stop there. That evening, or the next, after some correspondence, Goode apologized. Old Jube, as he is best known to his soldiers, was a true type of the Virginia Unionist. These men opposed secession, and loved the Union for the sake of the fathers and for its own sakeGoode apologized. Old Jube, as he is best known to his soldiers, was a true type of the Virginia Unionist. These men opposed secession, and loved the Union for the sake of the fathers and for its own sake, but they loved Virginia and their own people above all else. So, when Lincoln called for troops and Virginia seceded, they hesitated not a moment as to which side they would take in the now inevitable conflict. Nothing in all history is grander
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
will speedily make the Maryland room one of the most appealing and attractive in the building. In this room were Mrs. Charles Marshall, Baltimore, Md., Regent; Mrs. Charles O'B. Cowardin, nee Anne Moale, of Baltimore, Md., Vice-Regent; Mrs. Thomas H. Leary, Jr., alternate; Mrs. J. D. Patton, Mrs. H. Frazier, nee Nannie Turpin Maryland; Mrs. E. T. D. Myers, Jr., nee Grace Adams, Maryland; Mrs. Waller Morton, nee McIntosh, Maryland; Mrs. Alfred Gray, Mrs. B. Saunders Johnson, Maryland; Mrs. John Goode, nee Lelia Symington; Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson, Maryland; Mrs. Thomas Symington, nee Maude Randolph; Mrs. John K. Jones, nee Wilkinson, of Annapolis; Mrs. Innes Randolph, and Mrs. James Pleasants. Tennessee and Florida rooms. The rooms representing these States communicate. The ladies in the Tennessee room were: Mrs. Kellar Anderson, Regent of Tennessee; Mrs. Norman V. Randolph, Vice-Regent; Mrs. J. W. White, alternate, of Lee Camp Auxiliary. Committee: Mrs. Wilbur Armistead, Me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D. (search)
9. First and Last Days of the War, Reminiscences of, 294. Five Forks, Battle of, 58, 78. Fleming, Col. John A., Killed, 73. Flowers, Colonel Robert L., 273. Fort Fisher, Bombardment of, 166. Fort Hamby, on the Yadkin, 266. Fort Steadman, Capture of, 74. Fredericksburg, Battle of, 198. Gettysburg, Battle of, Charge of N. C. Troops in, 44, 158; Events Leading Up to; Address of Colonel Charles Marshall, 205; Pickett's Charge at, 229; Discussed, 253, 342, 348. Goode, Hon., John, 296. Gum Spring, N. C., Action at, 62. Half-Way House, 67. Hainesville, Va., Skirmish at, 106. Hampton (General Wade, and Butler, General M. C.), Exploits of; Charge, March 10, 1865, Haleck, General H. W., on Gen. Meade, 251. Harris, Captain E. V., killed, 73. Hartford Convention, The, 16. Hassell, Lieutenant, Theodore, killed, 172. Hatcher's Run, Battle of, 55. Hazlewood, Captain M. W., 229. Heintzelman, General S. P., 260. Heth, General H., on Battle of Get
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ted of the following gentlemen: Hon. T. R. B. Wright, of Essex; St. George R. Fitzhugh, Judge J. B. Sener, Rufus B. Merchant and Hon. J. H. Kelly, of Fredericksburg; William F. Drinkard, Joseph Bryan, William Ryan, Rev. Dr. John B. Newton, General Archer Anderson, Colonel Frank G. Ruffin and Judge Waller R. Staples, of Richmond; Ex-Governor Fitzhugh Lee, of Glasgow; Judge William J. Robertson, of Charlottesville; General Eppa Hunton, of Warrenton; Major Holmes Conrad, of Winchester; Hon. John Goode, of Norfolk, and Hon. Taylor Berry, of Amherst. Most of these gentlemen were personal friends of the deceased statesman, but there was no purpose of limiting the committee, except to representative Virginians. This committee met at Richmond on December 2, 1891, and were aided by the presence and counsel of a number of distinguished gentlemen, including members of the General Assembly of Virginia. General Joseph R. Anderson was elected chairman, and a committee was appointed to dr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ave been satisfactory and creditable to the Southen people. Hon. John Goode, President of the Constitutional Convention, one of the few su to Confederate history. Some time ago in addressing the Camp, Mr. Goode stated that he wished to correct two errors of history. One wasded on terms satisfactory and creditable to the Southern people. Mr. Goode was requested to write out his recollections as to these matters nder, manifested and expressed his intention to carry on the war. Mr. Goode also makes it very plain that Mr. Lincoln did not offer any termse South which our people could have even thought of accepting. Mr. Goode's paper. The very interesting paper prepared by Mr. Goode is aMr. Goode is as follows: In compliance with the request of R. E. Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans, I give my personal recollection as to two matters, whon, furled their banners and laid down their arms at Appomattox. John Goode. Our dead at Elmira. [from the Nashville American, October,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
ave been satisfactory and creditable to the Southen people. Hon. John Goode, President of the Constitutional Convention, one of the few su to Confederate history. Some time ago in addressing the Camp, Mr. Goode stated that he wished to correct two errors of history. One wasded on terms satisfactory and creditable to the Southern people. Mr. Goode was requested to write out his recollections as to these matters nder, manifested and expressed his intention to carry on the war. Mr. Goode also makes it very plain that Mr. Lincoln did not offer any termse South which our people could have even thought of accepting. Mr. Goode's paper. The very interesting paper prepared by Mr. Goode is aMr. Goode is as follows: In compliance with the request of R. E. Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans, I give my personal recollection as to two matters, whis gallant army having fought to the point of complete exhaustion, furled their banners and laid down their arms at Appomattox. John Goode.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
on of, 7. Flag, Confederate States, first flown in England, 208. Foard, Captain N. P., 142 Forrest, General N. B., Achievements of, 337. Gailor, Bishop T. F., 337. Gaines' Mill, Battle of, 304. 349. Gaither, Captain George R., 137. Garrett, John W., 165. G Company, 26th Virginia, Roll of, 240. Gettysburg, 124; Storming Stone fence at, 3839. Gilmor, Colonel, Harry, 137. Goldsborough Major W. W., 185, 291; Sketch of, 243. Goochland Troop, Roll of, 228, 311. Goode, Hon., John, 177. Gordon, Colonel James B. killed, 141. Gorgas, General, Josiah, 349. Grant, General U. S. 272; his change of base, 285; losses in. 287. Greble, Lieutenant John T., 202. Greer, Mrs., Hal. W., 314. Gunboats, Federal, 142, 208, 16. Guy, Colonel John H, Roll of battery of, 311. Harper's Ferry, Capture of 134. Harper, General, Kenton, 163. Hatcher's Run, April 5, 1865, 291. Henderson, Hon Don E., 297; Colonel R. J 220. Hill, D. H., 207, 296. History Committ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
did not ship the pontoon train intended for Genito, and used the boats for another purpose, so that the pontoon bridge at Goode's was the only available crossing for wagons on April 3rd, when it was availed of by wagon trains which came east of the the Appomattox river being unavailable on the 3rd and 4th, the troops ordered that way were forced to cross the river at Goode's bridge, which required more time and delayed concentration at Amelia Courthouse; for additional time was required for t a longer route, the time of crossing the river was prolonged by the larger force to be passed over the pontoon bridge at Goode's, and the railroad bridge at Matoax. Besides this, the water was falling during the time of crossing at Goode's, and thGoode's, and the approaches to the pontoon bridge had to be readjusted from time to time, causing occasional interruptions to the use of that bridge. The delay of at least one day disconcerted General Lee's plans, and gave Grant time to occupy the commanding ri
1 2 3 4 5 6