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The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 1 1 Browse Search
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should join the British representation, but to this Fish objected, because he said Bright was so committed to the American view that his action would have less weight in England. Lord de Grey, afterwards Lord Ripon, was a member of Gladstone's cabinet, and Northcote, afterward Lord Iddesleigh, belonged to the opposition. The American commissioners were the Secretary of State, General Schenck, the newly appointed Minister to England, Judge Nelson of the Supreme Court (a Democrat), ex-Attorney-General Hoar, and the actual law officer of the Government, Attorney-General Williams. It was at this juncture that the Administration requested its friends in the Senate to select another chairman for the Committee on Foreign Affairs, as Sumner's impracticable doctrines, as well as his refusal to speak to either the President or the Secretary of State made the treaty an impossibility if he remained in the place. Sumner was removed, and the negotiations proceeded successfully. In less than tw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Degrading influence of slavery—Reply of Judge Critcher to Mr. Hoar. (search)
Degrading influence of slavery—Reply of Judge Critcher to Mr. Hoar. In the debate on Education in the House of Representatives, Mr. Hoar, of Massachusetts, remarked that slavery in the South was not so observable in the degradation of the slave as in the depravity of the master. Mr. Critcher, of Virginia, replied: Reminding the gentleman from Massachusetts that every signer of the Declaration of Independence, except those from his State, and perhaps one or two others, were slave-owners, Mr. Hoar, of Massachusetts, remarked that slavery in the South was not so observable in the degradation of the slave as in the depravity of the master. Mr. Critcher, of Virginia, replied: Reminding the gentleman from Massachusetts that every signer of the Declaration of Independence, except those from his State, and perhaps one or two others, were slave-owners, he would venture to make a bold assertion; he would venture to say that he could name more eminent men from the parish of his residence, than the gentleman could name from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He would proceed to name them, and yield the floor to the gentleman to match them if he could. On one side of his estate is Wakefield, the birth-place of Washington. On the other side is Stratford, the residence of Light Horse Harry Lee, of glorious Revolutionary memory. Adjoining Stratfo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The dismemberment of Virginia. (search)
y her own, and hasten to place herself, without waiting to count the cost, by the side of imperiled Massachusetts? Did she not, by her own unaided efforts, achieve the conquest of a vast domain, and afterward, with a more than imperial generosity, cede it as a free gift to the Confederation? Let the answer be taken from the lips, not of devoted sons or partial friends, but of eminent representatives of the geographical section and the political school most opposed to her. There is, says Senator Hoar, of Massachusetts, no more touching story of the munificence and bounty of one people to another than that of Virginia to Massachusetts when the port of Boston was shut up by Act of Parliament and by a hostile English fleet. * * * * * Little had happened which bore hardly upon Virginia. * * There was no personal suffering here. It was only the love of liberty that inspired the generous people of the Old Dominion to stand by Massachusetts. * * * * * * But saving, therefore, my allegiance
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
. B., 16. Greeley, Horace, 325, 329. Greg. Percy, 332. Grigsby, Hugh Blair, 351. Guthrie, Rev., Donald, 372. Hampden-Sidney College, 258, 289. Hamilton, Alex., 189. Hamilton, Capt., James, 105. Hammond, Lieu't., killed, Hanover C. H.; Engagement at, 249. Harper's Ferry, Va., 139 Hawes, Samuel P., 259. Hay, Mary Eliza, 33. Hayes, General; captured, 8. Henry, Win. Wirt, 350. Herbert, Hon. H. A.; address of, 215. Heyward, Caroline Thos., 33. Hill, Maj. James H., 158. Hoar, G. F.; on the Generosity of Va., 53. Hobart, Pasha, 161 Hobson, Lt. R. P., 219, 232. Hoge, Rev. Dr., M. D., 10, 243; A Memorial of, 255; Ancestry and Kindred, 257; Devotion to the South, 261; Went abroad for Bibles, 261; As a Slaveholder, 262; Some Addresses of, 264; Oratorical Powers, 266; Trusts held, 266; Huguenot extraction of, 267; Anniversary Celebrations of Pastorate, 267: His Family a Mason, 271; Services in Behalf of Education, 276; Tribute to by Rev. Dr. Kerr, 277; At the Sick
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
Then we have a standing army now three-fold what was abundantly large as late as 1898, and which the President may at his pleasure make five-fold. The terrible danger to liberty in that no intelligent man needs to be told. Expansion was the name affected by its defenders for the foreign conquests of the United States, but, growing confident from impunity, they now frankly call it by its proper name—imperialism. Such staunch and veteran partisans of the North as the late Mr. Godkin, Senator Hoar, Carl Schurz, Charles F. Adams, and other like men have set forth its terrible evils. They show the vile things done on a large scale, and press in vain on the President for a hearing. The President sets forth afresh in his address in Philadelphia on November 22, 1902, his reasons for rejoicing in the career of the armies of conquest in Cuba, Porto Rico and in the Asiatic waters; but his Judge-Advocate-General has to report that I in 20 of this army, the nobleness of which the President
h. Dane. Hitchins, Augustus, yeoman, h. Cambridge. Hinds, Lewis H., McLean Asylum. Hodgden, Phineas S., carpenter, Laurel. Hodgden, L., carpenter, h. Laurel. Holton, Leonard, b. truckman, h. Broadway. Holt, Chauncey, brickmaker, h. Broadway. Holt, Charles, b. auctioneer, h. Franklin. Holbrook, George, b. accountant, h. Broadway. Holt, John, b. silversmith, h. Prospect hill. Hook, Edwin, b. wheelwright, h. Milk. Hook, George G., b. organ builder, h. Central. Hoar, James, laborer, h. Leland. Horton, Reuben, trunk-maker, h. Franklin. Hoyt, John, brickmaker, h. Medford. Howard, Mr., blacksmith, h. near L. R. Road. Homer, Mary B., widow, h. Cambridge. Howard, Mr., blacksmith, h. near Asylum. Hopps, Charles, painter, h. Spring. Hudson, Samuel, provision dealer, h. Beacon. Hudson, Charles H., attorney at law, boards with S. Hudson. Hunnewell, John, clerk, h. Medford. Huston, John, h. Bond from Derby. Ireland, Mrs. Grace, wid
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10., Extracts from Selectmen's Records. (search)
Extracts from Selectmen's Records. Concerning Town Records. Jan. 6, 1800. Voted, That The Town Clerk be desired to provide a Chest suitable to hold all the Towns Books & Papers in his office. Vol. I, p. 32. Dec. 7, 1827. Voted, To allow A. Bartlett for cash pd Mr. Hoar for consultation on Town business & for lock & keys on Town Chest & amount to his office as T. Clerk 6.53. Vol. III, p. 141. May 4, 1840. Permission was given Mr. Coburn to deposit his trunk of Books in Towns Safe nightly. Vol. IV, p. 18. March 5, 1844. That the clerk be directed to post an advertisement & offer a reward of five dollars for the recovery of the Record Book of Selectmen which has been missing since August last. Vol. V, p. 8. Memo. Fly leaf, Book 5. The Book containing the records of Selectmen of Medford from 1834 to the 1st of August, 1844 This date should be August 7, 1843. was missed from the Clerks Office at the date of the commencement of this Book & advertised as los
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