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The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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eeting has presented to the enrolling officer a series of resolutions, conveying the pleasant information that any attempt to enroll will be made "at his peril." If Pennsylvania news circulates in Indiana, this officer's reflections must be of the most gloomy character. To use the expression of the intelligent telegrapher at Wartrace, Tenn., "things is working." Maryland, it appears, is likely to be the scene of another battle. It is positively stated (but not by Northern papers) that Hooker has crossed into Maryland by the different fords between White's ferry and Seneca. General Rodes's headquarters are reported to be at Williamsport, Md., and Hagerstown is said to be held by us as a base of supplies from the Cumberland Valley. There are 10,000 Confederates at Cumberland, and a number of canal boats on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal have been destroyed by the rebels. The departments at Washington are packing up their archives, and we suppose that it might be added with truth
ry Frights[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. Near Middlesboro, June 23, 1863. The last week — from June 17th to yesterday inclusive — has been characterized by incessant conflicts between the cavalry under Gen. Stuart and the enemy's. Heavy damage has been inflicted upon the latter, and he has received a lesson by which he seems disposed to profit. Nearly a week ago our cavalry drove back the enemy's near Middleburg, too a great number of prisoners, and captured two members of Hooker's staff. Engagements have occurred every day since, but that which took place on June 21st was the most never and one of the hottest of the war. The enemy under Gens. Pleasanton, Stahl, and Barnes, advanced early in the morning with nearly of quite 20,000 cavalry, fifteen regiments of infantry, and four or five batteries, and attacked Gen. Stuart on the Little River Turnpike between Middleburg and Rector's Creas Roads, at the same time moving on his left and endeavoring to cut him off from
een intending to visit a Yankee camp about two miles distant, that of the 1st Army Corps, which is described as remarkably attractive in locality and arrangements, being laid out with streets and sidewalks, in city style, with arches overhead the whole length, covered with interlacing boughs of greenery to impart a cooling shade to the promenaders. Artistic taste developed in adorning the "summer bowers" of the Army of the Potomac, as a Washington paper characterized their encampment, where Hooker had apparently settled down for the summer, until roused to precipitate evacuation by Confederate general-ship. No doubt permanent location would be very much to Yankee taste, both at Belle Plain and Aquia. At the latter place, I heard this morning, two gunboats were still stationed, and shelling at intervals, in order to preserve the wharves and buildings from the destruction. I have no doubt an effectual veto will be put upon any future occupation of that point. Stafford needs complete
Affairs at Nashville The Nashville correspondent of the New York Freeman's Journal sends an interesting letter from that city. When Hooker was defeated at Chancellorsville, the Nashville Press and Union published extras announcing the utter annihilation of the Confederate army.--The next morning they apologized for having published the lie, and said the information was furnished them by official authority. The Press, however, a few days after, published a dispatch from Philadelphia announcing that Gen Keys had taken Richmond, and that "the Federal flag now floats over the rebel capital." The correspondent gives an interesting account of the scenes upon taking the oath: The period of fifteen days allowed for Nashville and the surrounding country to become loyal has expired, and the sum total is 7,344 oaths, of which 721 were those of non-combatants. Among these are persons of every degree and shade of degree, the large majority no doubt deeming it a necessity to save them
The Daily Dispatch: June 26, 1863., [Electronic resource], An Exequatur granted by the Confederate Government. (search)
Yankee prisoners. --The arrivals of Yankee prisoners yesterday from the Winchester fight numbered 1,247, making the aggregate 3,494. Yesterday afternoon there were 97 received, 30 of whom were officers. They were chiefly from the fight at Aldie. Among the officers were Col L P Casinola, of the 4th N Y cavalry, Maj W R Steleg, of the 7th Ill cavalry Acting Adjutant on Gen Hooker's staff; and several Chaplains, including Geo H Herman, of 12th Pa; E W Brady, 168th Ohio; C C McCabe, 122d Ohio; E C Ambler, 67th Pa, and Geo T Brown, 6th Md.
eat deal more than the Generals in the field, and we cannot imagine why Lincoln does not dismiss Hooker and put one of them at the head of his army. One thing, however, the World has guessed as w Pennsylvania. The powerful force he has with him; the skill with which be marœuvred to deceive Hooker and cross the Potomac without molestation; the immense stores which he has already collected; orne. We cannot, in the meantime, avoid smiling when we read the imagined contingencies, in which Hooker may get the better of Lee, and, perhaps, "bag his army." We can only say, if Hooker can bag Lee Hooker can bag Lee he is welcome to him; but we should not be surprised to hear that Lee had bagged Hooker. Throughout the whole Confederacy the highest degree of confidence is felt in Gen. Lee. --The people feel cHooker. Throughout the whole Confederacy the highest degree of confidence is felt in Gen. Lee. --The people feel confident that he is bent upon some enterprise which will have a most important bearing upon the of the war.--They feel assured that he, who has heretofore proved himself so prudent, so cautious, so s
The Daily Dispatch: July 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], Capture of Fairfax C. H.--Hooker's army. (search)
Capture of Fairfax C. H.--Hooker's army. The following official dispatch was received at the War Department Tuesday night: Headq'rs Cav. Div., June 27, 1863. General S. Cooper: I took possession of Fairfax C. H. this morning at 9 o'clock, together with a large quantity of stores. The main body of Hooker's army has gone towards Leesburg, except the garrison of Alexandria and Washington which has retreated within the fortifications. Very respectfully,Your ob't serv't, J. E. ker's army. The following official dispatch was received at the War Department Tuesday night: Headq'rs Cav. Div., June 27, 1863. General S. Cooper: I took possession of Fairfax C. H. this morning at 9 o'clock, together with a large quantity of stores. The main body of Hooker's army has gone towards Leesburg, except the garrison of Alexandria and Washington which has retreated within the fortifications. Very respectfully,Your ob't serv't, J. E. B. Stuart, Major General.
d its spars. They seem to fear advancing with Hooker in their rear; but are living on the country ws gained a position of so much importance upon Hooker's rear, there is cause for apprehension conceren broken. A flank movement on the part of Gen. Hooker across the three lower fords may result disss and celerity which completely surprised General Hooker, Lee transferred his army from Fredericksbvogue in radical circles last year, "bag him." Hooker would, therefore, seem determined to keep his ooker's army and beating it in detail. But if Hooker still keeps it together on the south side of tom immediate support from the loyal States, Gen. Hooker would derive any advantage from getting in lation of his army; but if, on the other hand, Hooker should be beaten, the strategy on which he andall care for his communications, he can compel Hooker to fight him on ground of his own choosing, an discussing the way in which Lee out-generally Hooker, says: Thus, by a bold and rapid movemen[15 more...]
ing more desperate. On the 18th Gen Stuart occupied Middleburg with Robertson's and W. H. F. Lee's brigade. During this day Major Mosby captured an aid of Gen Hooker, who was bearing most important information. From information found on this aid it was ascertained that the enemy were advancing on Culpeper C. H, by way of Way of the Federal cavalry but they made feeble resistance, retreating to Great Falls. Rockville was, be it remembered, on the direct route from Washington city to Hooker's army. Soon after the rest of the cavalry had reached Rockville, a large wagon train approached from the direction of Washington city, and was apparently but sl of Gettysburg. In answer to this, it is sufficient to say that these captures were made on the regular line of the cavalry march, which was following closely in Hooker's wake, observing his movements. That night Gen. S pushed on, and whilst at Brookeville, as also on the next day at Cooksville, he paroled a number of prisoners,
Cumberland, ordered the concentration of Maj Gen Hooker's command at Bridgeport, preparatory to Secuhe reconnaissance the plan agreed upon was for Hooker to cross at Bridgeport to the south side of thhe south side and hold the road passed over by Hooker. In the meantime, and before the enemy cooga Valley to Lookout Valley. On the 28th Hooker emerged into Lookout Valley at Wauhatchie, by ision of the 12th corns) the first night after Hooker's arrival in the Valley. The attack failed, hto the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton.--Hooker will at the same time attack, and, if he can, e the original plan, so far as it contemplated Hooker's attack on Lookout Mountain, which would givey eight o'clock the next morning, to report to Hooker, who was instructed in this event to attack Locompleted the crossing of the river. When Hooker emerged in sight of the northern extremity of day's Contest. On the morning of the 25th Hooker took possession of the mountain top with a sma[5 more...]
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