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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dallas, (search)
Dallas, A city in Georgia, where, during the Atlanta campaign, Sherman's advance under General Hooker was temporarily checked, May 25, 1864. Three days later Hardee attacked McPherson on the right, with great loss. The Confederates retired June 6.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
rce the passage of the Rappahannock, where General Hooker, notwithstanding the reverse at Chancellory on the east side of the Blue Ridge, to tempt Hooker from his base of operations, thus leading him rebel general was promptly discovered by General Hooker, and, moving with great rapidity from Frederal Lee's first object, namely, the defeat of Hooker's army on the south of the Potomac, and a dirennsylvania, in the hope that, in this way, General Hooker would be drawn to a distance from the capi Pennsylvania. Up to this time no report of Hooker's movements had been received by General Lee, hich were so soon to follow. As soon as General Hooker perceived that the advance of the ConfederValley, Stuart was east of the mountains, with Hooker's army between, and Gregg's cavalry in close plligence. Not a moment had been lost by General Hooker in the pursuit of Lee. The day after the rhis critical and anxious state of affairs, General Hooker was relieved, and General Meade was summon[2 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fair Oaks, or seven Pines, battle of (search)
msburg, half a mile beyond a point known as the Sever Pines, and 6 miles from Richmond. General Couch's division was at Seven Pines, his right resting at Fair Oaks Station. Kearny's division of Heintzelman's corps was near Savage's Station, and Hooker's division of the latter corps was guarding the approaches to the White Oak Swamp. General Longstreet led the Confederate advance, and fell suddenly upon Casey at a little past noon, May 31, when a most sanguinary battle ensued. Very soon the rely wounded, and borne from the field; and early in the evening a bayonet charge by the Nationals broke the Confederate line and it fell back in confusion. The fighting then ceased for the night, but was resumed in the morning, June 1, when General Hooker and his troops took a conspicuous part in the struggle, which lasted several hours. Finally the Confederates, toiled, withdrew to Richmond, and the Nationals remained masters of the field of Fair Oaks, or Seven Pines. The losses in this ba
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fredericksburg, battle at. (search)
the construction of bridges across the Rappahannock were not received by Burnside until the first week in December. Then 60,000 National troops under Sumner and Hooker lay in front of Fredericksburg, with 150 cannon, commanded by General Hunt. The corps of Franklin, about 40,000 strong, was encamped about 2 miles below. On 3 had fallen, and yet the struggle was maintained. Howard's division came to the aid of French and Hancock; so, also, did those of Sturgis and Getty. Finally, Hooker crossed the river with three divisions. He was so satisfied with the hopelessness of any further attacks upon the strong position of the Confederates, that he begged Burnside to desist. He would not yield. Hooker sent 4,000 men in the track of French, Hancock, and Howard, to attack with bayonets only. These were hurled back by terrific volleys of rifleballs, leaving 1,700 of their number prostrate on the field. Night soon closed the awful conflict, when the Army of the Potomac had 15
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grover, Cuvier 1829- (search)
Grover, Cuvier 1829- Military officer; born in Bethel, Me., July 24, 1829; graduated at West Point in 1850, entering the 1st Artillery. He was made brigadier-general of volunteers in April, 1861, and commanded a brigade in Heintzelman's corps in the Army of the Potomac. When Hooker took command of the troops at Fairfax (1862), General Grover took that officer's division. From December, 1862, to July, 1864, he commanded a division of the 19th Corps in the Department of the Gulf. He was in the Shenandoah campaign in 1864; and from January till June, 1865, he was in command of the District of Savannah. General Grover was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general in the regular army, March 13, 1865, for meritorious services during the Rebellion ; was promoted to lieutenantcolonel of the 38th Infantry in 1866, and colonel of the 1st Cavalry in 1875, which command he held till his death in Atlantic City, N. J., June 6, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Groveton, battle of. (search)
road, and support McDowell, while Pope moved along the railway towards Manassas Junction with Hooker's division. He directed General Porter to remain at Warrenton Station until Banks should arriveen to Gainesville. McDowell reached Gainesville without interruption; but near Bristow Station, Hooker encountered General Ewell, and in the struggle that ensued each lost about 300 men. The latter hastened towards Manassas, but Hooker's ammunition failing, he was unable to pursue. Pope now ordered a rapid movement upon the Confederates at the Junction, while General Kearny was directed to maoveton and attack Jackson on wooded heights near. He ordered Heintzelman, with the divisions of Hooker and Kearny, towards Gainesville, to be followed by Reno, while Porter, with his own corps and Kiand took position on Sigel's right. Reynolds and Reno also came up, followed soon afterwards by Hooker. Then the Nationals outnumbered the Confederates, and for some hours the battle assumed the asp
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 17: the woman suffrage movement (search)
a gold medal. This prize was secured for her through the intervention of Hon. Edward Everett. She had also been appointed Professor of Astronomy at Vassar College. What was Maria Mitchell? A gifted, noble, lovable woman, devoted to science, but heartloyal to every social and personal duty. I seemed to know this of her when I knew her but slightly. At the time appointed, the congress assembled, and proved to be an occasion of much interest. Mrs. Livermore, Mrs. Stanton, Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker, Lucy Stone, Mrs. Charlotte B. Wilbour were prominent among the speakers heard at its sessions. I viewed its proceedings a little critically at first, its plan appearing to me rather vast and vague. But it had called out the sympathy of many earnest women, and the outline of an association presented was a good one, although the machinery for filling it up was deficient. Mrs. Livermore was elected president, Mrs. Wilbour chairman of executive committee, and I was glad to serve
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
opriation for the New Orleans Exposition, 398. Hoffman, Matilda, engaged to Washington Irving, 28. Holland, Mrs. Henry (Saba Smith), reception at her house, 92. Holland, Dr. J. G., at Newport, 402. Holmes, Dr., Oliver Wendell, at the Bryant celebration, 277-280; as a traveling companion, 277, 280; his paper at the Radical Club on Jonathan Edwards, 286; speaks at the meeting to help the Cretan insurgents, 313; writes a poem for the memorial meeting to Dr. Howe, 370. Hooker, Mrs., Isabella Beecher, speaks at the woman's congress, 385. Horace, 174; Orelli's edition of, 209. Houghton, Lord (Richard Monckton Milnes), the poet, Mrs. Howe meets, 97; entertains her in 1877, 410; takes her to Mr. Gladstone's, 411. Housekeeping, the trials of, 213-215; every girl should learn the art of, 216. Howe, Florence. See Hall, Mrs. David P. Howe, Julia Romana. See Anagnos, Mrs. Michael. Howe, Mrs., Julia Ward, asked to write her reminiscences, 1; birth and parentage, 3,4;
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