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place than Dixie's land. The Hilja went off during the day, and will proceed to the British Provinces. The British ship Monmouth, from Liverpool and the ship General Parkhill, from the same place, were seen off the bar yesterday and were ordered off, and we understand that the Niagara had previously sent off three other squarerigged vessels. During Sunday the Niagara went well off shore, accompanied by two of the above vessels, and while she was absent the British ship A. and A., Captain Hutchinson, from Belfast, stood in from the eastward, when the Niagara made after her; but the ship, having much the start, was run into shoal water, where the frigate could not well approach her, when the Niagara put about and proceeded south. Should the boats of the Niagara omit to board the A. and A. before morning, she may be got into port with the aid of steam. The race was anxiously watched from the wharves, and also by a party of gentlemen who were out in the pilot boat Rover, Captain Ev
pump e is led through the steam-jacketed chamber m to enable it to volatilize the bisulphide of carbon in a. g is a gas-holder to hold any superfluous gas, to keep the capacity adjusted to the varying volume of the contents. The boiling-point of the bisulphide of carbon is 118° Fah. The process is adapted to dissolving the oils contained in the strippings of machine-cards in factories, and saving the waste from the axles of car-boxes, the journal-boxes of machinery. See also Sim's and Hutchinson's processes and machines, patented 1869, 1870, 1871. These are also particularly intended for extracting fusel-oil from grain. Oil-fil′ter. Robinson's oil-filter acts by the upward pressure of a column of water below the oil. The operation is as follows: — Robinson's oil-filter. Oil-gas apparatus. The butt g of oil being placed on a stillion, communication is made with its lower portion by means of a pipe a leading from a cistern of water n. As the water flows into the bu
hout mitering with the horizontal cross fillets on the panels. Ru′pert's drop. A tear-shaped drop of unannealed glass. On breaking a piece from the point or tail the whole drops to pieces. This philosophical toy was first brought into notice, perhaps invented, by Prince Rupert, nephew of Charles I. of England. Mr. Peter did show us the experiment of the chymicall glasses, which break all to dust by breaking off a little small end; which is a great mystery to me. — Pepys, 1662. Hutchinson's forceps for rupturing the prepuce. Rup′tur-ing-for′ceps. (Surgical.) An instrument used in rupturing the prepuce in cases of phimosis. It is introduced between the glans and the prepuce, distending the latter to rupture or forming a director for the bistoury. Ru′ral lock. (Locksmithing.) A cheap kind of lock with a wooden case. In Fig. 4505, K is the key having studs which lift the spring tumblers H H′ out of the notches i i in the springbolt C. The spring-tumbl
l 23, 1867. Starch and cellulose treated in acidulous water, boiled under pressure. Saccharine liquid neutralized with lime, filter, defecate with bone-black, concentrate to 20° B. Allow the lime to precipitate. Filter; neutralize with soda. Boil, crystallize (?) Mold. Loew, June 25, 1868. Woody fiber digested in hydrochloric acid, and heat; acid distilled over. Glucose and paper-stock the results. Wesselholft, October 6, 1868. Extract of malt for dietetic purposes. Sim and Hutchinson, March 16, 1869. Meal treated with bisulphide of carbon to extract oil, rendering starch more easily saccharified. Delamarre, December 6, 1870. Sweet potatoes steamed, mashed, and mixed with malt, macerated, steamed, pulp precipitated, saccharine liquid decanted, concentrated. Grosheintz, May 23, 1871. Hydrochloride or sulphuric acid saturated with an alkali to produce a salt which may remain in the saccharine matter. Sug′ar-cane mill. A mill for grinding sugarcane. See Fig
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
cer and 26 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 56 Enlisted men by disease. Total 83. 9th Minnesota Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Release, Hutchinson, St. Peter, Fort Snelling, Glencoe and Fort Ridgly August 15 to October 31, 1862. Company A participated in Campaign against Sioux Indians in Minnesota Augusy B participated in Campaign against Sioux Indians in Minnesota August and September, 1862. March to Glencoe. Action at Glencoe September 3. Defence of Hutchinson September 3-4. Duty at Hutchinson till April, 1863. Moved to Hanska Lake and duty there till September, 1863. Company C participated in Sibley's Campaiction at Fort Abercrombie September 26, 1862. Mustered in October 30, 1862. Company H organized in Carver County. Moved to Glencoe, thence to relief of Hutchinson. Action at Hutchinson September 4. At Glencoe till April, 1863. Guard at hanging of Indians at Mankato December 26, 1862. At Fort Abercrombie till O
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 11: Brook Farm. (search)
in his enumeration of eccentricities men witli beards; for I can well remember when Charles Burleigh was charged with blasphemy, because his flowing locks and handsome untrimmed beard was thought to resemble — as very likely he intended — the pictures of Jesus Christ ; and when Lowell was thought to have formally announced a daring impulse of radicalism, after he, too, had eschewed the razor. The only memorial we retain unchanged from that picturesque period is in some stray member of the Hutchinson family who still comes before the public with now whitening locks and vast collar that needs no whitening; and continues to sing with unchanged sweetness the plaintive melodies that hushed the stormiest meeting when he and his four or five long-haired brothers stood grouped round their one rose-bud of a sister like a band of Puritan Bohemians. Amid all these wild gospellers came and went the calm figure of Emerson, peaceful and undisturbed. I can remember that, after certain of his le
ys spoke Massachusetts! The parallel still proceeds. The unconstitutional Stamp Act was welcomed in the Colonies by the Tories of that day precisely as the unconstitutional Slave Act has been welcomed by large and imperious numbers among us. Hutchinson, at that time Lieutenant Governor and Judge in Massachusetts, wrote to Ministers in England: The Stamp Act is received with as much decency as could be expected. It leaves no room for evasion, and will execute itself. Like the judges of our dExcellency to excuse us from doing anything to assist in the execution of it. The Stamp Act was welcomed in the Colonies by the Tories of that day, precisely as the unconstitutional Slave Act has been welcomed by imperious numbers among us. Hutchinson, at that time Lieutenant Governor and Judge in Massachusetts, wrote to Ministers in England: The Stamp Act is received with as much decency as could be expected. It leaves no room for evasion, and will execute itself. Like the Judges of
the hardships of it will shortly appear to them in such a light, as shall induce them in their wisdom to repeal it; in the meantime, we must beg your Excellency will excuse us from doing anything to assist in the execution of it. Thus in those days spoke Massachusetts! The parallel still proceeds. The unconstitutional Stamp Act was welcomed in the Colonies by the Tories of that day precisely as the unconstitutional Slave Act has been welcomed by large and imperious numbers among us. Hutchinson, at that time Lieutenant Governor and Judge in Massachusetts, wrote to Ministers in England: The Stamp Act is received with as much decency as could be expected. It leaves no room for evasion, and will execute itself. Like the judges of our day, in charges to grand juries, he resolutely vindicated the Act, and admonished the jurors and the people to obey. Like Governors of our day, Bernard, in his speech to the Legislature of Massachusetts, demanded unreasoning submission. I shall not,
t that the Parliament has seen fit to pass such an Act as the Stamp Act; we flatter ourselves that the hardships of it will shortly appear to them in such a light as shall induce them, in their wisdom, to repeal it; in the meantime, we must beg your Excellency to excuse us from doing anything to assist in the execution of it. The Stamp Act was welcomed in the Colonies by the Tories of that day, precisely as the unconstitutional Slave Act has been welcomed by imperious numbers among us. Hutchinson, at that time Lieutenant Governor and Judge in Massachusetts, wrote to Ministers in England: The Stamp Act is received with as much decency as could be expected. It leaves no room for evasion, and will execute itself. Like the Judges of our day, in charges to Grand Juries, he resolutely vindicated the Act, and admonished the Jurors and the people to obey. Like Governors in our day, Bernard, in his speech to the Legislature of Massachusetts, demanded unreasoning submission. I shall
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The old South meeting House (1876). (search)
f man which the State borrowed so directly from the Christian Church. The towers of the North Church rallied the farmers to the Lexington and Concord fights; and these old walls echoed the people's shout, when Adams brought them word that Governor Hutchinson surrendered and withdrew the red-coats. Lingering here still are the echoes of those clashing sabres and jingling spurs that dreamed Warren could be awed to silence. Otis's blood immortalizes State Street, just below where Attucks fell (his grand movement, in its cradle, owed to them. I would ally the Green Dragon Tavern and the Sons of Liberty with the Old South, the grandsons, and great grandsons, and representatives of the men who made the bulk of that meeting before which Hutchinson quailed, and Colonel Dalrymple put on his hat and left the Council Chamber. It was the message of the mechanics of Boston that Sam Adams carried to the governor and to Congress. They sent him to Salem and Philadelphia; they lifted and held
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