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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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The Army. --General A. S. Johnson has been assigned to the command of the department of Texas. General Harney has been tendered his choice of the department of the West and department of California. He will probably select the latter, on account of large private interests in that quarter requiring some little of his personal attention.
Resignation. --The last arrival from California brings intelligence of the resignation of Gen. A. S. Johnson, one of the most skillful and accomplished officers in the U. S. Army. He is a native of Kentucky, but was appointed from Texas.
Officers returning home. --The New Orleans Delta, of the 18th inst., says: Col. George Crittenden, late of the United States Army, and one of its most gallant and accomplished officers, arrived in the city yesterday from New Mexico, via Texas. Col. Crittenden resigned from the old concern before leaving New Mexico, despite the tenacity with which his father clung to the Union--From Col. C. we learn that Major Loring was only waiting to be relieved in New Mexico to return to the South, and that some five or six other officers who had resigned were also on their way home. Gen. A. S. Johnson, it is supposed, is with Colonel Jack Hays' party, which started from California some time ago, in the direction of Texas.
all civil and military offices are vacant, and provides for a government for the Territory until such time as the Confederate Congress otherwise provides. A. S. Johnson and party arrived at Masells on the 31st of July. He took command. The Confederates are preparing to meet the Federals under Lieutenant Moore, and is advancinn the 31st of July. He took command. The Confederates are preparing to meet the Federals under Lieutenant Moore, and is advancing from Tucanae. It is stated that Johnson undoubtedly captured those troops. Johnson will be at San Antonio on the 15th of September. The Federal officers taken at Fort Fillmore have been paroled. n the 31st of July. He took command. The Confederates are preparing to meet the Federals under Lieutenant Moore, and is advancing from Tucanae. It is stated that Johnson undoubtedly captured those troops. Johnson will be at San Antonio on the 15th of September. The Federal officers taken at Fort Fillmore have been paroled.
Generals Slack and Clark, of Missouri, were severely wounded; General Price slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Oaurchill's regiment, Capts. Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and Weaver, all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty.--Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Louisiana regiment. LieutCol Neal, Major H Ward, Captains King, Pearson, Gibbs, Ramsaur, Porter, Lieuts. Dawson, Chambers, Johnson, King, Adams, Hardista, McIvor and Sadler, were wounded while at the head of their companies. Where all were doing their duty so gallantly, it is almost unfair to discriminate. I must, however, bring to your notice the gallant conduct of the Missouri Generals, McBride, Parsons, Clark, Slack, and their officers. To Gen. Price I am under many obligations for assistance on the battle-field. He was at the head of his force, leading them on and sustaining them by his gallant bearing.
py the following concerning war matters, and if it is all as incorrect as the statement about Gen. Johnson's movements, there is no reliance to be placed on it: The fifteen hundred men from Cali to. There have been a large number of rumors afloat in reference to the movements of Gen. A. S. Johnson, late in command of the Pacific Division, but the San Francisco Morning Chronicle pronounces them all untrue. It seems that Johnson started from Los Angeles with a company ostensibly for the destination of Texas. After the party left Los Angeles, a disagreement occurred and they divided. Gen. Johnson returned to this city and took passage for the East on the steamer, and a portion of the original party, under command of a resident of Los Angeles and a well-known citizen of this place, proceeded into Mexico. The reports that Gen. Johnson had arrived in Virginia, and that he had accepted the command of the late Gen. Garnett, are incorrect. Our informant is of the most relia
Confederate Congress.first session. Senate. Tuesday, April 8, 1862. The House met at 12 M., in the Chamber of the Virginia Senate. The battle of Seilon. Mr. Haynes asked that the resolutions sent from the House yesterday, in relation to the battle in Tennessee, and the death of Gen. A. S. Johnson, be taken up, in order to offer in lien thereof the following: Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That Congress have learned with gratitude to the Divine Ruler of nations, the intelligence of the recent complete and brilliant victory which has been gained by the army of the Confederate States, under the command of Gen. A. S. Johnston, over the Federal forces in Tennessee, on the battle field of Shiloh. Resolved, [That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby cordially tendered, to Gen. Gustave T. Beauregard, and the officers and troops under his command, for the decisive and important victory achieved by them over the for
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