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y, in his patent, gives the following formulas. Parts by weight. Heats to 260°, gradually increases to 300° F. a. Linseed-oil, 2; cotton-seed oil, 1; raw turpentine, 2; sulphur, 2. Time, 1 hour. b. Linseed-oil, 2; castor-oil, 1; liquid coal-tar, 2; petroleum, 1; turpentine, 2; sulphur, 2. Time, 30 minutes or more. c. Linseed-oil, 2; petroleum, 1; crude turpentine, 1/2; sulphur, 4. Time, 35 minutes. Kerite-wire. Wire used in telegraphy, insulated by a covering of kerite. Kern. 1. (Printing.) The part of a letter which overhangs the shank. It occurs more frequently in italic than in Roman: jolly old fag embraces the kerned letters of an italic font. 2. (Milling.) A hand-mill for grain. See Quern. Ker′sey. (Fabric.) A probable corruption of Jersey, whence it came. A coarse ribbed cloth made from wool of long staple. Ker-sey-mere′. (Fabric.) A light woolen twilled goods with an oil finish, for men's wear. Named from Kersey, in York
ha plate. Caret.Gutter. Carriage.Gutter-snipe. Case.Hair-line. Ceramic printing.Hat-tip press. Chase.Head-stick. Chromatic printing.Horn-book. Clay-process.Horse. Color-printing.Imposing. Column-rule.Imposing-stone. Composing-frame.Inferior letter. Composing-machine.Ink-cylinder. Composing-stand.Ink-fountain. Composing stick.Inking-trough. Condensed letter.Ink-roller. Copper-faced type.Ink-slice. Copperplate press.Inner form. Copy-holder.Inset. Crochet-type.Italic. Crotchet.Kern. Cutting-line.Lead. Cylinder printing-press.Lead-cutter. Dabber.Leader. Damping-machine.Lean face. Dead matter.Letter. Descending letter.Letter-board. Diamond.Letter-case. Dipping-pan.Letterpress-printing. Dip-roller.Ligature. Distributing-machine.Lithographic press. Distributing-roller.Live matter. Double-cylinder press.Logotype. Double letter.Long primer. Drum.Lower case. Mailing-machine.Printing-telegraph. Manifold writing-book.Printing-wheel. Matrix.Printing-yarn. Mat
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 4 (search)
t Longstreet found this important point already covered, and if gained it would be at the price of a battle. The force at the point of contact was McCall's division of Pennsylvania Reserves, formed at right angles across the New Market road, in front of, and parallel to, the Quaker road. McCall's disposition was as follows: Meade's brigade on the right, Sey mour's on the left, and Simmons' (Reynolds') in reserve. Randall's (Regular) battery in front of the line on the right, Cooper's and Kern's opposite the centre, and Dietrich's and Kennerheim's (twenty-pounder Parrotts) on the left. Sumner was at some distance to the left, and somewhat retired; Hooker was on Sumner's left, and somewhat advanced; Kearney was to the right of McCall. The brunt of the attack, however, fell upon McCall's division. In the Confederate line the division of Longstreet held the right, and that of A. P. Hill the left. Longstreet opened the attack at about three o'clock, by a threatening movement on McCa
noble service. On the 31st the brigade took the Federal hospital and suffered terribly in driving the enemy from the cedar brake. The brigade took 1,100 men into action and lost 504 in killed, wounded and captured. The Forty-fifth had 217 men engaged, and lost 71 killed and wounded, and 41 missing. General Cleburne specially mentioned for gallantry Colonel Charlton, Maj. E. F. Nunn, Adjt. Frank Foster, Sergeants Asbury, Doolittle, Morrison, Vaughan, Stewart, Lieut. G. W. Williams, Sergeant-Major Kern, Corporals Mallett, Hackler and Read, and Private McChadin. Corporal Read volunteered to carry the colors after two color-bearers had been shot down. After the tide of battle had set against the Confederates, Lieutenant Foster was particularly conspicuous in the gallant way in which he rallied the men. Major Hawkins' two companies of sharpshooters did excellent service, and lost 32 men. After McCook and Sheridan had been driven back Polk sent Patton Anderson's brigade forward aga
, and cisterns to catch the rain and snow. Here the Spaniards received gifts of game, deer skins, bread, and maize. Three other days brought Alvarado to Tiguex, in the valley of the Del Norte, just below Albuquerque, perhaps not far from Isletta; A comparison of the letters of Coronado and of Jaramillo in Ramusio, and of the narrative of Castañeda in Ternaux-Compans, with the narrative of Espejo in Hakluyt, III. 457, ed. 1810, and the ancient maps of New Mexico, confirm the opinion of Kern in Schoolcraft, IV. 34, on the position of Tiguex. and in five Chap. II.} 1540. days more, he reached Cicuye, on the river Pecos. But he found there nothing of note, except an Indian who told of Quivira, a country to the north-east, the real land of the buffalo, abounding in gold and silver, and watered by tributaries of a river which was two leagues wide. The Spanish camp for the winter was established near Tiguex; there Alvarado brought the Indian who professed to know the way to Quivi
The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1861., [Electronic resource], Thirty hours with a skunk in a Mining shaft. (search)
The Legislature. In the House, the amendment of Mr. Kern to the bill incorporating the Southern Express Company was insisted upon, the Senate having returned the bill with the same stricken out. The bill incorporating the American Agency was called up, on motion of Mr. Bisbie, and laid on the table, after being debated. On motion of Mr. Seddon, the bill for the relief of the contractors on the Covington and Ohio Railroad was passed — ayes 82, nays 36. The Senate, yesterday, agreed to House resolution for an adjournment sine die on the 1st of April. Sundry bills of no importance were reported and resolutions offered. A number of bills were passed. The tax bill was debated.
Night session of the Legislature -- The House was called to order at half-past 7 o'clock by Mr. Tomlin. On motion of Mr. Kern, the bill to stay executions was taken up and made the order of the day for Thursday next. A resolution was offered by Mr.Crump, for leave to bring in a bill requiring the Banks to resume specie payment after the Maryland Banks have done so. It was debated, and indefinitely postponed. A bill was passed for incorporating the Little Kanawha Mining and Manufacturing Company : also, a bill repealing sections 28, 20, 30, 3t and 32 of the Code of Virginia, relative to the resumption of specie payment by the Banks. By leave, Mr. Christian reported a bill for the incorporation of the Staunton Savings Banks, which was read twice. Mr. Watts offered a resolution for rescinding the rule adopted on Friday, which required the Chair to be vacated at 2, and resumed again at 7½ o'clock.-- Objected to by Mr. Duckwall, and laid over. Adjourned.
overnor was authorized to order out such portion of the "militia of the State as he may deem necessary," and the question being on agreeing thereto, Mr. Seddon obtained the floor, and proceeded to answer the argument advanced by Messrs. Robertson and Segar, which he did at length, taking the Southern State-Rights view of the questions now agitating the public mind. Mr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtained the floor, and commenced an argument against Collier's last proposition to strike out, which he continued for four hours, with many interruptions and calls to order. A call of the House being agreed on, several hours were consumed in calling the roll. The doors were locked, and the Sergeant-at-Arms dispatched after absentees, the members in the meantime amusing themselves in talking and other innocent amusements. At 4½ o'clock, Collier's amendment was adopted, on a call
overnor was authorized to order out such portion of the "militia of the State as he may deem necessary," and the question being on agreeing thereto, Mr. Seddon obtained the floor, and proceeded to answer the argument advanced by Messrs. Robertson and Segar, which he did at length, taking the Southern State-Rights view of the questions now agitating the public mind. Mr. Segar replied by correcting his friend from Stafford in relation to his misconceived views of his position. Mr. Kern obtained the floor, and commenced an argument against Collier's last proposition to strike out, which he continued for four hours, with many interruptions and calls to order. A call of the House being agreed on, several hours were consumed in calling the roll. The doors were locked, and the Sergeant-at-Arms dispatched after absentees, the members in the meantime amusing themselves in talking and other innocent amusements. At 4½ o'clock, Collier's amendment was adopted, on a call
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], Execution of Thos. J. Armstrong in Philadelphia. (search)
ed form During the prayer offered by the Rev. Mr. McAuley, Armstrong listened calmly, and then advancing, spoke in a firm voice, as follows: "My friends, let me say in passing I die in peace with my Maker, and if at this moment a pardon were offered to me on condition of giving up my Maker I would not take it. To the few people here, I would advise them to take warning by my fate Sabbath-breaking was the first cause I bid you farewell. To the prison keepers, to Mr. Perkins, to Sheriff Kern, and to my spiritual adviser, Mr. McAuley, I bid farewell; gentlemen, I bid you all farewell; I now die in peace with everybody." There was much disappointment that the dying man had made no allusion to the crime for which he was about to suffer, and at the last moment he showed the same reticence in this respect as at the time of his sentence.--At the conclusion of his remarks the fatal rope was placed about his neck, and all except the sheriff and the condemned left the scaffold.
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