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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The First North Carolina Volunteers and the battle of Bethel. (search)
Tuesday for Richmond, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lee (three companies having previously gons none of us will hesitate to follow. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee and Major Lane are also good officers tributed to his coolness and courage. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee and Major Lane are all that we could d work, and I had the invaluable aid of Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, of my regiment, in its plan and constlph, with one howitzer, to join them. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, First regiment North Carolina volunteable body situated on the other side. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee brought in one prisoner. How many of e of our command was hurt. Soon after Lieutenant-Colonel Lee left, a citizen came dashing in with tof the 10th June, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, he says: Colonel Lee's command took ontleman of the name of Phillips, who joined Colonel Lee's detachment somewhere on the road. I do nonor we had done him. Three cheers for Lieutenant-Colonel Lee were then given, and he, too, favored [4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thanksgiving service on the Virginia, March 10, 1862. (search)
mate estimate may be made. Very truly yours, Marcus J. Wright. The great disparity between the forces of Grant and Lee in 1865 is exhibited in the following reminiscence of Hon. Thomas S. Bocock, who died August 5, 1891, near Appomattox CourMr. Bocock was then Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Confederate Congress and accompanied the delegation. Lee's forces and Grant's. Shortly afterwards Mr. Bocock and some friends were invited to a supper at the Exchange Hotel to it for duty; that General Grant's forces were of such superiority in numbers that he could make a united attack along his (Lee's) entire line from Richmond to his right flank in Dinwiddie county and yet have a sufficient force to turn his flank and thern Virginia did the Virginia troops constitute? To this General Breckinridge replied that the greater portion of General Lee's army were Virginians. Mr. Bocock then asked to what point did the Confederate Government propose to remove and ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
osal to furnish 300,000 pounds of lead. Lieutenant Lee went to Baltimore, where Merrill, Thomas &with Smith & Hitchcock for the reasons named in Lee's endorsement on their proposals. He asked Leee Federal army, and it was felt that as long as Lee stood for the defence of Richmond, Richmond waswith what an ever-increasing superior force General Lee had to contend, how attenuated his lengthent was here that Mr. Davis was notified that General Lee's lines had been broken, and Richmond wouldearnest, and desirous to have the move made. Lee refused. When I reached Harpers Ferry and deegic Movements—Old Salem Church—Parts played by Lee and Gordon. General Hooker, commanding the Fvice on either side—greater in numbers than General Lee had in his entire force to oppose him with. after Stoneman, who was endeavoring to cut off Lee's supplies. In this direction, however, Jackso besides small arms, and lost 17,287 men, while Lee had only 59,681 troops, 160 cannon, besides sma[34 more...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
as also the order dated January 19th to Lieutenant C. C. Lee to go North and look after the purchaseosal to furnish 300,000 pounds of lead. Lieutenant Lee went to Baltimore, where Merrill, Thomas &nt, 44 inches high, 84x88 inches, at $20, which Lee said was not the kind intended by the militaryw York to Norfolk, Newbern or Wilmington. Lieutenant Lee made an adverse endorsement on Hitchcock'sMass., offered to furnish cartridge-boxes, etc. Lee endorsed: He is not willing to deliver at Norfoto make any contract, but gave list of prices. Lee said: Mr. Ames says he does not desire to be unell, including 4,000 12-pounder shells. Lieutenant Lee sent to the Governor plans for two powder ntry. February 14th, the Governor wrote Lieutenant Lee that he did not like to make a contract with Smith & Hitchcock for the reasons named in Lee's endorsement on their proposals. He asked Lee tLee to make out an order for fuses and friction primers for cannon, and said if he could not do better, [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
evacuation-day. Surprise and consternation. Faith in Lee and his men so great that both citizens and Officals were unncle Bob, as the soldiers lovingly and familiarly called General Lee, had hurled back the advancing forces of the Federal army, and it was felt that as long as Lee stood for the defence of Richmond, Richmond was safe. I remember, indeed, that as a b it never seriously occurred to me, or to any one else, that Lee could not successfully cope with General Grant, and this contle realized with what an ever-increasing superior force General Lee had to contend, how attenuated his lengthened line of demost part found its religious home in this church. Here General Lee worshipped when in the city, and here also Mr. Davis andthere. For it was here that Mr. Davis was notified that General Lee's lines had been broken, and Richmond would have to be awillingness to believe the worst, and such our confidence in Lee and his army, that in the absence of any official announceme
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Virginia supplied Maryland with arms. (search)
Virginia supplied Maryland with arms. John W. Garrett's advice. Wanted Virginia army to Occupy Baltimore, but General Lee refused. Major McDonald's reminiscences. Major E. H. McDonald, of Charlestown, W. Va., contributes to the sun someimore was then full of supplies necessary to an army. They seemed much in earnest, and desirous to have the move made. Lee refused. When I reached Harpers Ferry and delivered their messages to General Harper, he sent me immediately to Richmond. Arriving there the next day, I had an interview with General Lee, who, on the 23d of April, had been put in command of all the Virginia troops. He was eminently a cautious leader and did not approve of moving our forces to Baltimore. If the coarched to join the Marylanders in the defense of Baltimore, and the first battle of the war would have been fought there. Lee's caution may have lost Maryland from the list of Confederate States, but from within her borders came many of the braves
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
The fight well described by a Georgia Colonel. Fighting Joe Hooker boasted. He was confident and restless, but ultimately Learnt his Lesson— how Jackson lost his Life—Some brilliant strategic Movements—Old Salem Church—Parts played by Lee and Gordon. General Hooker, commanding the Federal army in 1863, occupied the hills north of the Rappahannock river in rear of Fredericksburg, Va., with a force of about 125,000 thoroughly equipped and well seasoned troops. It was by far the bthe backs of the Confederate soldiers. He had been transferred to the army of the Potomac for the express purpose of taking Richmond. So sanguine was he of accomplishing this feat that he dated his general orders Headquarters in the Saddle. General Lee's army of 59,000 veterans occupied the south bank of the river and in front of Fredericksburg. It was composed of Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps and McLaws' and Anderson's divisions of Longstreet's corps (Longstreet, with the bal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
should be introduced among us. Finally, however, the bill was passed, but with a provision that nothing in this act shall be construed to authorize a change in the relation of the said slaves. But Mr. Hunter, of Virginia, had denounced it as involving emancipation, advancing this argument, among others, that negroes now are deterred from going to the enemy only by the fear of being put in the army. If we put them in they will all go over. But the bill passed only a few months before General Lee's surrender, and never became operative. The Sun asks whether or not, if it had been made effective at the time General Cleburne proposed it, it might not have changed the whole course of events. Reason and religion both say no. The seeds of that war were implanted in the Constitution, and their germination was only a question of time. War was inevitable, and, like other things, the manner of its termination was directed by the innate Power. But for the consolation afforded by this
A Commendable enterprise. Rev. Dr. Hoge, in view of the importance of providing some useful employment for the leisure hours of soldiers in our neighborhood, has procured, and had removed to "Camp Lee," one of the large tents belonging to the city, where a reading room will be established for the free use of all the men who choose to avail themselves of it. He has already collected a little library, which he is anxious to increase to a large one. We hope he will be universally sustained in this praiseworthy enterprise by our citizens. In every family there are a few books and magazines, new and old, which the owners would readily spare to such an object. Any kind of book will answer which is moral, instructive, and entertaining — only send them at once. Dr. Goge (corner of Main and 5th streets,) will take charge of them, and when the Camp is removed, have them added to the Library of the Young Men's Christian Association.
N. C. Volunteers. --Seven hundred men, the balance of the First Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, part of which has been encamped for several days at Howard's Grove, arrived in Richmond via Petersburg Railroad, at 11 o'clock Tuesday night, and proceeded immediately to camp. The South need not wish to have a better armed or more determined set of men than these from the Old North State. The following is a list of the regimental and company officers;--D. H. Hill, Colonel Commanding; C. C. Lee, Lieut. Colonel;--Lane, Major. J. L. Bridges, Edgecomb, Captain Edgecomb Guards; W. I. Hoke, Southern Star, Lincoln county; L. S. Williams, Captain Hornet's Nest Rifles;--Bell, Captain Enfield Blues; W. W. McDowell, Captain Buncombe Rifles; C. M. Avery, Captain Burke Rifles;--Ross, Captain Charlotte Greys; Richard Ashe, Captain Craig Light Infantry; Wright Huske, Captain L. F. Light Infantry, Fayetteville; J. B. Starr, Captain L. F. Light Infantry, Fayetteville. The Regiment, all told, n
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