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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
. The news of Longstreet's presence was soon conveyed to Meade and Grant, and reenforcements were sent Hancock, while Sedgand the advantages seemed to be with Grant, who had ordered Meade to start his trains at 3 P. M., so as to clear the roads, a corps had been fought to a standstill. About this time, Meade ordered Sedgwick to reenforce Warren with his whole corps as, but meanwhile, a fire breaking out in the woods in rear, Meade ordered Barlow withdrawn. This was done with the loss of ot, and the first attack was never renewed. About 10 A. M., Meade ordered the attack discontinued, and the troops withdrawn. d the guns and drove out the enemy. Grant had authorized Meade, about 7 A. M., to discontinue all assaults which seemed unpromising, but Meade continued to urge renewed efforts until 1.30 P. M. Each of the principal corps complained repeatedly of tes that some hours after the failure of the first assault, Meade sent instructions to each corps commander to renew the atta
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 21: the movement against Petersburg (search)
the strategy belongs, I believe, to Grant, though possibly it may be shared by Meade's chief of staff, Humphreys, whose modest narrative makes no reference to the s the next day. When he returned to the Army of the Potomac, he failed to notify Meade of the hour of Smith's march, and other details, and Meade, of course, did not Meade, of course, did not inform Hancock. It resulted that Hancock was not ordered to march until 10.30 A. M., when he might just as easily have marched at sunrise, and he was directed by a to bury or remove. A few deserters or prisoners were picked up, and from them Meade learned that Beauregard's whole force had been but two divisions and Wise's bris, and in efforts to arrange for simultaneous assaults by the different corps. Meade himself at last fixed upon twelve o'clock, and ordered each corps at that hour t midday the 2d corps made two assaults, both repulsed with severe loss. Later Meade again ordered — assaults by all the corps with their whole force, and at al
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
ools. Engineer officers were designated to accompany all columns, and even pontoon trains were at hand to bridge the Appomattox in pursuit of fugitives. Finally, Meade personally impressed on every corps commander the importance of celerity of movement. Briefly, no possible precaution was omitted to be carefully ordered, and th little infantry supporting this gun, or able to reach it, without exposure. Ayres's attack would probably have been successful. He was about to go forward, when Meade directed all offensive operations to cease. Wright's brigade arriving about half-past 11, Mahone made a second attack, which was repulsed with the aid of the Fedending General was not present in person to witness the operations. There is nothing in the Reports to explain this. Grant sent a despatch to Halleck at 10 A. M., saying that he was just from the front, and about that time Humphreys reports that Meade, with Grant's concurrence, ordered the cessation of all offensive movements.
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
was about to begin, it was suspended by the opportune arrival on the ground of Meade. Meade had read Lee's letter to Grant of that morning, and he took the responsMeade had read Lee's letter to Grant of that morning, and he took the responsibility of sending Lee a letter granting a truce of one hour, in view of the negotiations for a surrender. This letter was delivered at Field's lines, and, Humphreywas apprehensive lest hostilities might begin in the rear on the termination of Meade's truce. Babcock accordingly wrote requesting Meade to maintain the truce untiMeade to maintain the truce until orders from Grant could be received. To save time this was taken at once through our lines by Col. Forsyth of Sheridan's staff, who was accompanied by Col. Taylorefore Fredericksburg. 5th against Hooker on the Rappahannock. 6th against Meade in Pennsylvania. 7th against Grant before Richmond. This last campaign e 15, 1862, to Jan. 25, 186313,214 HookerJan. 26, 1863, to Jan. 27, 186325,027 MeadeJune 28, 1863, to May 4, 186431,530 GrantMay 4, 1864, to April 9, 1865124,390
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