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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
venth battalion, two companies reserves, one company Bonaud's battalion, one company light artillery, effective total 382. At river batteries, Forts Jackson and Lee, Battery Cleves and Battery Lawton, three companies Twenty-second battalion, and Mercer artillery, effective total 253; at Isle of Hope, three light batteries, 176 men; at Rosedew, two companies Cobb guards, 135 men; at Beaulieu, Hanleiter's light artillery and two companies Twenty-seventh battalion, 218 effective; at Fort McAllistety-ninth battalion cavalry, Capt. A. W. Hunter; Bonaud's artillery, Capt. M. T. McGregor; Capt. J. W. Brooks' battery; Cobb guards, Maj. A. L. Hartridge; Daniel's, Guerard's and Maxwell's batteries, under Capt. J. A. Maxwell; Hanleiter's battery; Mercer artillery, Maj. T. D. Bertody, and McAlpine's engineers. In addition there were the Third South Carolina cavalry, ten companies South Carolina reserves, and six South Carolina batteries. Although the year 1863 had closed in despondency, befo
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
illery of Hardee's corps consisted of four battalions under Col. Melancthon Smith; of Hood's corps, three battalions under Col. R. F. Beckham; of the cavalry corps, one battalion under Lieut.-Col. F. H. Robertson. The Georgia brigade of Gen. H. W. Mercer, composed of the First volunteer regiment, Col. C. H. Olmstead; Fifty-fourth, Lieut.-Col. Morgan Rawls; Fifty-seventh, Lieut.-Col. C. S. Guyton; Sixty-third, Col. G. A. Gordon, was afterward added, from Savannah, and assigned to Walker's di; Govan's brigade, 772 strong, which reported the capture of 700 prisoners and eight guns, also reported a loss of 408 killed and wounded and 91 missing, including many officers; J. A. Smith's brigade lost 198, including Col. R. Q. Mills wounded; Mercer's Georgia brigade lost 168; one regiment of Manigault's brigade lost 97. This is over 1,500 from a small part of the forces engaged. Logan reported the capture of 18 stand of colors, some. thing over 5,000 stand of small-arms, and, in additi
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
d Major Caswell, Georgia sharpshooters, had charge of the skirmish line. Jackson's brigade gained the second line of Federal works, and remained there until after the Federal retreat. Among the killed was Colonel Smith, First Georgia Confederate, who fell while most gallantly putting his regiment into the interior works of the enemy. After the death of Cleburne, who was succeeded temporarily by Gen. James A. Smith, Col. C. H. Olmstead took command of the brigade of that officer (formerly Mercer's). When the army moved from Florence, Smith's brigade was detached and left behind for the purpose of guarding a supply train. It did not rejoin the army until December 6th, in front of Nashville. Following the battle of Franklin, Bate's division was with Forrest in the investment of Murfreesboro. In the battle at that place, December 7th, Tyler's and Jackson's brigades won the Confederate honors of the day, driving back in gallant style that part of the enemy's line which confronted t
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
xth), Lieut.-Col. Lovick P. Thomas. In Gen. Wade Hampton's cavalry were the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Twelfth Georgia cavalry regiments; Phillips' legion, under Maj. W. W. Thomas; Cobb's legion, Capt. R. B. Roberts; Tenth Georgia, Capt. E. W. Moise. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson had a brigade command in Hampton's cavalry. In the foregoing infantry organizations are represented the consolidated fragments of the brigades of Brig.-Gens. John K. Jackson, H. R. Jackson, H. W. Mercer, Alfred Cumming and M. A. Stovall, which had participated in the operations up to that time in their original organizations, but in very reduced numbers. Stovall's and Jackson's brigades of Clayton's division were together but 416 strong in the battle of Kinston, March 10th, and lost 70. Cumming's brigade had 23 effectives. Under the command of Col. Robert J. Henderson, during the fighting at Bentonville, March 19th to 22d, it was warmly commended by General Stevenson for gallantry in
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
December, 1864, and sent him to Savannah, where he commanded a brigade in the division of Gen. Hugh W. Mercer during the siege of that city by Sherman's forces. Lieutenant-General Hardee, who was inGen. Patton Anderson, in command of the district of Florida, at Lake City; later reported to General Mercer at Savannah in General Hardee's division; and in the siege of Savannah he commanded the cen city of Savannah. He continued to reside in that city until his death in 1898. Brigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer Brigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer, a grandson of Gen. Hugh Mercer, of revolutionaBrigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer, a grandson of Gen. Hugh Mercer, of revolutionary fame, was born in Virginia in 1808. In 1824 he was appointed a cadet at the United States military academy, and graduated in 1828 as second lieutenant, Second artillery. He served at Fortress Moned major-general and sent to command in Georgia, his division being composed of the brigades of Mercer and John K. Jackson. After the war had ended General Wright made his home at Augusta, and edite
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The siege and evacuation of Savannah, Georgia, in December, 1864. (search)
rred. The siege and garrison guns employed in arming this line had been withdrawn from the city lines constructed by General Mercer in 1862 and 1863. In anticipation of the siege, General George W. Rains, commanding the Augusta arsenal, gun foundriic and Gulf railroad bridge over the Little Ogeechee river, a distance of some seven miles. He had under him Brigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer, commanding his right from the Telfair swamp to a point near Lawton's house, and Brigadier-General John K. Jbeing interrupted by dense woods and impracticable swamps. It was held by about 2,700 men, twelve hundred under Brigadier-General Mercer and the rest under Brigadier- General Jackson. General Mercer's command consisted of Colonel Browne's local brigGeneral Mercer's command consisted of Colonel Browne's local brigade (composed of Major Jackson's Augusta battalion, Major Adams' Athens battalion and a regiment of local troops under Colonel Nisbet), Brooks' foreign battalion, a detachment of the 55th Georgia regiment and Captain Barnes' company of artillerists f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
ne Mountain, Georgia. Gabriel J. Rains. 482. Born North Carolina. Appointed North Carolina. 13. Brigadier-General, September 23, 1861. (1st) In charge Bureau of Conscription (‘62); (2d) chief of torpedo service (‘64). 1828. Hugh W. Mercer. 510. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia. 3. Brigadier-General, October 29, 1861. (1st) Commanding at Savannah, Ga.; (2d) commanding brigade in W. H. T. Walker's Division, Army of Tennessee. Joseph L. Locke. 515. Born Maine. Carolina. Appointed South Carolina. 22. Colonel, 1861. Commissary-General of Confederate States Army, 1861-‘64. James S. Williams. 656. Born Georgia. Appointed Georgia. 28. Major, 1864. Assistant Inspector-General to Brigadier-General H. W. Mercer, Army of Tennessee. 1838. P. G. T. Beauregard. 942. Born Louisiana. Appointed Louisiana. 2. General, August 31, 1861. Commanded at Charleston, 1861; later Department Potomac, 1861; then Army of Mississippi, 1863; com
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
43. Lockett, S. H., 73. Lomax, L. L., 69. Long, A. L., 61; J. O., 68. Longstreet, J., 52. Lovell, M.. 50. Lyon, H. B., 69. Mackall, W. W.. 39. Maclay, R. P., 48. McCown, J. P., 47. McDonald, A. M., 41. Magruder, J. B., 44; W. T., 60. Major. J. P., 69. McLaws, L., 52. McLean, E. E., 52. McLeod, H., 38. McLemore, O. K., 70. Marmaduke, J. S., 72. Marshall, H., 36. Martin, J. G. 37. Maury, D. H., 55. Maxey, S. B., 56. Meade, R. K., 70. Mechling W. T., 58. Mercer, H. W., 43; J. T., 68. Moore, J. C.. 58. Mouton, J. J., A. A., 62. Mullens, J., 18. Murray, E., 49. Myers, A. C., 36. Napier, L., 73. Nicholls, F. R. T., 68. Northrop, L. B., 45. Palfrey, E. A., 72. Patterson, C. E., 76. Pearce, N. B., 61. Peck, L., 72. Pegram, J., 67. Pickett. G. E., 56. Pemberton, J. C.. 39. Pender, W. D., 67. Pendleton, W. N., 44. Polk, L., 42; M. T., 64. Quattlebaum, P. J., 71. Radford, R. C. W., 54. Rains, G. J., 43; G. W., 50. Ramseur, S. D
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1862., [Electronic resource], List of the General officers in the armies of the Confederate States. (search)
ana, Army of Potomac. 56.Louis T. Wigfall, Texas, Army of Potomac. 57.James H. Trapier, South Carolina, Coast of Florida. 58.Samuel G. French, Mississippi, Army of Potomac. 59.William H. Carroll, Tennessee, East Tennessee. 60.Hugh W. Mercer, Georgia,--. 61.Humphrey Marshall, Kentucky, Kentucky. 62.John C. Breckinridge, Kentucky, Kentucky. 63.Richard Griffith, Mississippi, Army of Potomac. 64.Alexander P. Stewart, Kentucky, Kentucky. 65.William Montgomery Gardner,n H. Winder. Class of 1821--Isaac R. Tremble. Class of 1825--Daniel S, Donelson, Benjamin Huger. Class of 1826--Albert S. Johnston, John B. Grayson. Class of 1827--Leonidas Polk, Gabriel J, Rains. Class of 1828--Thomas F, Drayton, Hugh W. Mercer. Class of 1829--Joseph E. Johnston, Robt. E, Lee, Theopholia H. Holmes, Albert G. Blanchard. Class of 1830--John B. Magruder. Class of 1832--George B. Crittenden, P. St. George Cocke, Humphrey Marshall, Richard C Gatlin. Class of 18
Transfer. --Brigadier-General Ripley, lately in command at Charleston, has been transferred to Virginia. He is succeeded by Brigadier-General Hugh W. Mercer, a native of Virginia, who graduated at West Point, in 1824, resigned a lieutenancy in the U. S. army in 1835, and has since resided in Georgia, in civil life and employment, until his recent appointment.
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