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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 50 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 36 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 30 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 24 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 12, 1864., [Electronic resource] 17 3 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First iron-clad Monitor. (search)
emergency; an assurance that the Merrimac, with her draught, and loaded with iron, could not pass Kettle Bottom Shoals, in the Potomac, and ascend the river and surprise us with a cannon-ball; and advised that, instead of adding to the general panic, it would better become us to calmly consider the situation, and inspire confidence by acting, so far as we could, intelligently, and with discretion and judgment. Mr. Chase approved the suggestion, but thought it might be well to telegraph Governor Morgan and Mayor Opdyke, at New York, that they might be on their guard. Stanton said he should warn the authorities in all the chief cities. I questioned the propriety of sending abroad panic missives, or adding to the alarm that would naturally be felt, and said it was doubtful whether the vessel, so cut down and loaded with armor, would venture outside of the Capes; certainly, she could not, with her draught of water, get into the sounds of North Carolina to disturb Burnside and our force
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Exchange of prisoners. (search)
n Streight's men were detained on our side, or Morgan's men on his, exchanges were not stopped thereecuted? On the 26th of July, 1863, General John H. Morgan and his command were captured. They ws. Seven days afterward forty-two more of General Morgan's officers were sent from Johnson's Island letter, General Meredith informed me that General Morgan and his officers were held for others than had nothing to do with the treatment that General Morgan and his command received --and then I was told that General Morgan and his officers were not held for the members of Colonel Streight's comman this time, and for a long time afterward, General Morgan and his officers were continued in the pencretary of War. On the 5th of July, 1863, General Morgan captured the command of Lieutenant Colonelered back into service, he would report to General Morgan at some point within the Confederate linesd thus paroled actually captured a part of General Morgan's force. Lietenant Colonel Hanson himself[5 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Union view of the Exchange of prisoners. (search)
the full equivalent for the hundred as soon as they should be captured. Of course, Colonel Ludlow refused to accede to this proposition, but answered Judge Ould that unless Streight and all his officers were delivered he would return with the Confederate prisoners. Judge Ould persistently refusing to send Streight and his officers, Colonel Ludlow, accordingly, returned with them. Another violation of the cartel by the Confederate authorities came about in the following manner: Generals Morgan, Imboden, Ferguson, McNeil, and other guerrilla chiefs had captured a considerable number of Federal soldiers, made up of small foraging parties, stragglers, etc., and paroled them when and where captured, in order to avoid the trouble and expense of conveying them to any of the points designated in the cartel. These paroles not being valid, the men accepting them were ordered to duty immediately; but these paroles were all charged to the Government of the United States. After General
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid. (search)
Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid. General Basil W. Duke. The expedition undertaken by General Jopose. I do not remember to have ever seen General Morgan's remarkable military genius so vividly inhere it had been concentrated immediately when Morgan appeared upon the border. It was more than doable. So far from himself trusting to chance, Morgan, finding the river unguarded, and not even obsat short range, rushed back in confusion. General Morgan, at the head of a reserve of two hundred mtinued the attack would have been madness, and Morgan, drawing off his riders as suddenly as he had in contact with the enemy far oftener than General Morgan wished, for he was anxious to economize hienced, and two or three men were wounded. General Morgan at once ordered the section of three-inch ending out detachments in every direction, General Morgan was enabled to prevent, in some measure, ay little trouble, for it was in front, and General Morgan rode at its head with the guides. But the[16 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
But, unfortunately, he accepted the base alternative of continuing his flight, and that, too, with the artifice of a mean disguise. On continuing his journey, accompanied by his wife, whom he had overtaken at Washington, it was determined that the President and his friends should thereafter travel as an emigrant party. Mr. Reagan was still in his company. General Breckenridge had left outside the town of Washington, taking with him forty-five Kentucky soldiers, a straggling remnant of Morgan's Brigade. Ten mounted men had offered to escort Mrs. Davis, and although they had accepted their paroles, justly considered that they might protect a distressed lady from marauders. All tokens of the President's importance, in dress and air, were left aside; a covered wagon, pack-mule, and cooking utensils, were provided at Washington; and it was designed that Mr. Davis, his wife, and his wife's sister, should pass as a simple country family, emigrating from Georgia, and having fallen in
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
rawn up in line, another force of Federal cavalry. He passed very near to them, and, much to his relief, succeeded in reaching his brigade. There he informed Major Morgan, of the First Virginia Cavalry, of the perils he had escaped, and, directed him to the place where he would find the squadron he had last seen. Major Morgan aMajor Morgan at once, with an adequate force, repaired to the spot, finding the enemy occupying the same position, who at once surrendered. When Morgan returned with his prisoners, Lieutenant Payne inquired of their commander why he did not attempt to rescue the prisoners. The officer replied, I was only waiting to surrender, for we were all Morgan returned with his prisoners, Lieutenant Payne inquired of their commander why he did not attempt to rescue the prisoners. The officer replied, I was only waiting to surrender, for we were all too much excited to see that the greater part of your force were prisoners. Lieutenant Payne replied: I was not quite that far gone; but if you had made an attack I should have been compelled to withdraw the guard and let the prisoners go. When Fitz Lee returned to his position on the left flank of the army, Captain Randolph,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Death of General John H. Morgan. (search)
Death of General John H. Morgan. H. V. Redfield. [Second article.] It is a singular fact that nearly two-thirds of troops who finally routed the famous cavalry command of John H. Morgan and killed that daring raider. He vanquished armies, enville, Tennessee, a plain stone is set on the spot where Morgan fell. After his marvelous escape from the Ohio Penitentiaber morning, in the year 1864, when the roof sheltered John H. Morgan the last night he spent on earth. I have passed the hCampbell stood, whose unerring bullet pierced the heart of Morgan. Morgan is accused of carelessness in posting himself Morgan is accused of carelessness in posting himself and command, for the night, so near the enemy, and with so little precaution. The prime cause of the calamity to his commanas posted near Bull's gap, did not know of the presence of Morgan in that part of the country until six P. M., September 3d.cess in arresting, by an accurate shot, the flight of General John H. Morgan, one of our country's most prominent enemies.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
unteer Cavalry. But when it was determined to call out a large force of this arm, the government declined to have anything to do with volunteers, and this regiment found itself without a patron. At this juncture a controversy arose between Governor Morgan, of New York, and Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, as to the proprietorship of the regiment, which was decided in favor of New York, she having raised ten out of the twelve companies. We had been called the Lincoln cavalry up to that time;ncoln) Cavalry. Captain Boyd then made several efforts to get his company transferred to a Pennsylvania regiment, but without success. Governor Curtin had designated the company as the Tenth Pennsylvania cavalry during the controversy with Governor Morgan, and Pennsylvania never had a regiment to fill the vacancy left for Boyd's men. The company remained with General Franklin throughout the Peninsular campaign, rendering valuable services. By its bold conduct, and timely warning, it save
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio Railroad. (search)
, the one just related is the only instance of Morgan's abuse of prisoners which ever came to my earer Burnside's intentions were in the premises, Morgan succeeded, during twelve hours of intense anxileet of steamers, and, leisurely waiting until Morgan passed the city, we started up the river, undewe were constantly within reach of and feeling Morgan's right flank and rear. John O'Neil, since ofn either side. The capture and destruction of Morgan's command were trifling losses to the Confedere had less than six thousand men for duty when Morgan crossed the Cumberland. General Duke says: witnesses. Colonel R. A. Alston, chief of Morgan's staff, was captured on the evening of the 5that Captain Gurley was captured with others of Morgan's forces; that he was taken to Nashville, trieffington, but following those who got off with Morgan, and, finally, making a clean sweep of the flenant. The endurance displayed by that part of Morgan's command which was last captured, and by thei[48 more...]
Chapter 19: days of depression. Reverses on all lines Zollicoffer's death Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of war transportation dangers the Tennessee river forts Forrest, and Morgan gloom follows Nashville's fall Government blamed by people the permanent Government Mr. Davis' typical inaugural its effect and its Sequence Cabinet changes. The proverb that misfortunes never come singly soon became a painful verity in the South; and a terrible reaction began to still the high-beating om his own section, he seemed as ubiquitous as untiring. Keeping a constant front to the enemy-now here, now there, and ever cool, dauntless and unflinching-he gave invaluable aid in covering the rear of that retreat. About this time, also, John H. Morgan began to make his name known as a partisan chief; and no more thrilling and romantic pages show in the history of the times, than those retailing how he harassed and hurt the Federals while in Nashville. During the progress of these event
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