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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
k his head and replied: Too many cannon. But he called Jackson's attention to the fact that all of his artillery on the left was idle — that none werefiring save Pelham (the heroic boy artillerist )--and staff officers were sent to order every battery to move into action, and to continue firing as long as the battle lasted. A mellant, glorious Jeb. Stuart — could not resist the temptation of stirring them up, and so soon as his advance cavalry squadrons reached these heights he sent for Pelham, the heroic boy artillerist, and a section of his horse artillery, which he ordered to open on the camps. The confusion in McClellan's camps showed how completel McClellan that he must occupy those hills or all was lost. Stuart was momentarily expecting Longstreet, and resisted the strong force sent to dislodge him until Pelham had fired his last round, and then he learned to his chagrin that Longrstreet had again been misled by his guide and was six miles away. There was nothing left h
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
the enemy would be forced to attack at a disadvantage — the creek being impassable for some distance above. During Wednesday night, Stuart received a report from Pelham, commanding his artillery, describing this position and recommending its being seized. He forwarded the report to Lee, through Jackson, and early on the 3d, with, kept up until a body of infantry was found approaching by our right flank. I had no apprehension, however, as I felt sure Longstreet was near by, and, although Pelham had but two rounds of ammunition left, I held out, knowing how important it was to hold the ground till Longstreet arrived. The enemy's infantry advanced, and his battery kept up its fire. I just then learned that Longstreet had taken the wrong road and was then at Nance's shop, six or seven miles off. Pelham fired his last round, and the sharp-shooters, strongly posted in the skirt of woods bordering the plateau, exhausted every cartridge, but had at last to retire. . . . The next day
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
t supplies would be on hand within three days. Meanwhile, on Oct. 10 a fresh trouble arose. Stuart with 1800 cavalry and Pelham's battery had been sent by Lee upon a raid. Fording the Potomac, some 15 miles above Williamsport, at dawn on the 10th, s, 18 Brigades, 23 Batteries, 98 Guns31,692 Stuart's Cavalry Brigades, Hampton's, Lee F., Lee, W. H. F., Jones's, W. E.; Pelham's Artillery 5 Batteries, 22 Guns9,146 Pendleton's Reserve ArtilleryBrown's Battalion, 6 Batteries Cutt's Battalion, 3 Bawo guns which he had advanced within easy range. Meade replied with 12 guns, and one of Doubleday's batteries assisted. Pelham frequently changed his position, but kept up his fire for nearly an hour until ordered by Jackson to withdraw, one gun haries. These opened with the 47 guns in position upon the two flanks, and eight more sent out from Pendleton's reserve to Pelham. Under this fire the Federal advance was checked, and portions of the line, which received the brunt of it, were driven
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
's Div.1368385001,4748,200 Va. Paxton's Brig. From Report of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly wounded and missing.54430484 Va. Garnett's Brig. From Report of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly wounded and missing.52420472 N. C. Colston's (Va.)12859480802 La. Nicholls's From Report of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly wounded and missing.47266313 Colston's Div.2811,710802,0716,600 Artillery, 2d Corps26124150 Total 2d Corps1,2626,8701,5019,63335,800 Lee, F., Cav. Brig.4711 Pelham's Arty.46818 Grand Total1,6839,2772,19613,15656,444 Federal casualties COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTALSTRENGTH Reynolds's Div.115218 Robinson's Div.742655 Doubleday's Div.1233862 Total 1st Corps9804613516,908 Hancock's Div.784456011,124 French's Div.63506119688 Two Divs. 2d Corps1419517201,81216,893 Birney's Div.1199255631,607 Berry's Div.1,0372441,429 Whipple's Div.1116822891,082 Total 3d Corps3782,6441,0964,11818,721 Griffin's Div.1710813138 Sykes's Div.2716791285 Hu
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
Expedition to Auburn, Liberty and Alexandria February 3-5. Regiment mounted March 8. Expedition to Woodbury March 3-8. Expedition to Lebanon, Carthage and Liberty April 1-8. Expedition to McMinnville April 20-30. Reconnoissance to the front May 23. Armed with Spencer Carbines May 31. Liberty Road June 4. Liberty June 10. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 24-July 7. Hoover's Gap June 24-26. Occupation of Manchester June 27. Dechard June 29. Pelham and Elk River Bridge July 2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River and Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign August 16-September 22. Friar's Island September 9. Lee and Gordon's Mills September 11-13. Ringgold September 11. Leet's Tan Yard September 12-13. Pea Vine Ridge September 18. Alexander's Bridge September 18. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-Octo
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to September, 1864. Service. March to Nashville, Tenn., February 14-March 3. 1862. March to Duck River, thence to Savannah, Tenn., March 16-April 6. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Duty at Corinth till June 10. March to Iuka, Miss., thence to Tuscumbia, Florence, Huntsville and Stevenson, Ala., June 10-July 5. Expedition to Tullahoma July 14-18. March to Pelham July 24, thence to Altamont August 28. Reconnoissance toward Sequatchie Valley August 29-30. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg, August 30-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 16-November 7, and duty there till December 26. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. Duty at Murfreesboro till June. Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaig
March to Nashville, Tenn., February 14-25, 1862. Occupation of Nashville February 25 to March 16. March to Duck River March 16-21, and to Savannah, Tenn., March 31-April 6. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Duty at Corinth till June 10. Moved to Iuka, Miss., thence to Tuscumbia, Florence and Huntsville, Ala., June 10-July 5. Duty at Boulay Fork till August 30. Expedition to Tullahoma July 14-18. March to Pelham August 24, thence to Altamont August 28. Reconnoissance toward Sequatchie Valley August 29-30. March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 30-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-17. Lawrenceburg October 8. Dog Walk, Perryville, October. 9. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 17-November 7, and duty there till December 26. Kimbrough's Mills, Mill Creek, December 6. Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30. Battle of Stone's River December 3
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
dit of the town. Voted, That it is the wish of the citizens that volunteers enlisting from Amherst associate with the volunteers from Hadley, Hatfield, Leverett, Pelham, Sunderland, and Granby, in forming a company. August 25th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the nine-months service this year. 1864. June 1st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow and pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars for seventeen volunteers, to fill the quotas of Pelham under the present and future calls for men. Pelham furnished seventy-eight men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands. None were Pelham furnished seventy-eight men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seven thousand five hundred and one dollars ($7,501.00). The amount of money raised and expended by the town for State aid to the families of soldiers during the war, and which was afterward
New Bedford 141 New Braintree 653 Newbury 223 Newburyport 225 New Marlborough 91 New Salem 277 Newton 435 Norton 145 Northampton 351 North Andover 229 Northbridge 656 North Bridgewater 564 Northborough 654 North Brookfield 658 North Chelsea 598 Northfield 278 North Reading 439 O. Oakham 659 Orange 280 Orleans 43 Otis 93 Oxford 660 P. Palmer 313 Paxton 661 Peabody (see South Danvers) 243 Pelham 352 Pembroke 566 Pepperell 440 Peru 95 Petersham 662 Phillipston 664 Pittsfield 96 Plainfield 354 Plymouth 568 Plympton 571 Prescott 354 Princeton 665 Provincetown 46 Q. Quincy 511 R. Randolph 513 Raynham 147 Reading 442 Rehoboth 149 Richmond 98 Rochester 572 Rockport 230 Rowe 282 Rowley 232 Roxbury 515 Royalston 667 Russell 314 Rutland 669 S. Salem 234 Salisbury 239
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 10: Favorites of a day (search)
sher, James Ballantyne, says that he could most gratify the author of Waverley when he could say: Positively this is equal to Miss Edgeworth. Fifty years ago Frederika Bremer's works were in English--speaking countries the object of such enthusiasm that publishers quarrelled for the right to reproduce them in English, and old friendships were sundered by the competition to translate them. At that time all young men who wished for a brilliant social career still took for their models either Pelham or Vivian Grey,; and I remember that a man of fine intellect, who had worked in a factory till he was eighteen, once told me that he had met with no intellectual influence to be compared with that exerted upon him by Bulwer's novels. The historical tales of G. P. R. James were watched for by thousands of eager readers, and his solitary horseman rode through the opening page among the plaudits of a myriad hearts. Dickens laughed all these away, as Cervantes smiled away Spain's chivalry; an
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