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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
rrival of Farragut with the remainder of his squadron, a portion of Porter's mortar-fleet, and transports with four thousand land troops underempt was made to capture or destroy the Arkansas. The Essex, Captain W. D. Porter, and Ellet's Queen of the West were employed for the purposes, did not appear in time for the fight. On the following morning, Porter, with the Essex, accompanied by the Cayuga and Sumter, went up the ll's division, where insurgent bands under leaders like Poindexter, Porter, Cobb, and others, about five thousand strong, were very active. OAugust, 1862. McNeill, with one thousand cavalry and six guns, and Porter, with about twenty-five hundred men of all arms, had a desperate fight of four hours at Kirksville, in Adair County. Porter was defeated, with a loss of one hundred and eighty killed and about five hundred woo the river and were drowned. The survivors fled northward to join Porter, when they met Ben Loan, who forced them back and exposed them to a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
because I held the iron-clad in such terror, but because the community did. On the 4th instant I sent the Tennessee up to Baton Rouge with provisions for Commander Porter and the gun-boats stationed at that place. On the night of the 5th, she returned with the information that the enemy had made a combined attack upon Baton Rnsom had an officer on the State house, which overlooks the adjacent country, and could direct the fire of every shell. As soon as the enemy was repulsed, Commander Porter, with the gun-boats, went up stream after the ram Arkansas, which was lying about five miles above, apparently afraid to take her share in the conflict, accor, and probably soon disabled some of her machinery or steering apparatus for she became unmanageable, continuing, however, to fire her guns at the Essex. Commander Porter says he took advantage of her presenting a weak point towards him, and loaded with incendiary shells. After his first discharge of this projectile, a gush o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
siana bayous. Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. death of Commander Buchanan. vessels and officers of the West Gulf Squadron, January 1, 1863. Up to the time of the escapade of the ram Arkansas, a general idea has been given of the performances of Farragut's fleet. After leaving Rear-Admiral Davis and running the Vicksburg batteries, he proceeded down the river to New Orleans with the Hartford, Richmond, Brooklyn, Pinola and Kennebec. The old mortar fleet, which under Commander Porter had done such good service at Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and at Vicksburg, had been divided up and withdrawn from the upper Mississippi, and the river from Baton Rouge to Vicksburg was now virtually left to the Confederates, who deliberately went to work and lined the banks with guns, making, besides Vicksburg, another Gibraltar at Port Hudson, which caused much trouble to the Union commanders before they were able to retake it. The Mississippi had been so easily opened, all the w
ted by a vote to receive the petition — Yeas 35, Nays 10, as follows: Yeas: Messrs. Benton, Brown, Buchanan, Clay, Clayton, Crittenden, Davis, Ewing of Illinois, Ewing of Ohio, Goldsborough, Grundy, Hendricks, Hill, Hubbard, Kent, King of Alabama, King of Georgia, Knight, Linn, McKean, Morris, Naudain, Niles, Prentiss, Robbins, Robinson, Ruggles, Shepley, Southard, Swift, Tallmadge, Tipton, Tomlinson, Wall, Webster, Wright. Nays: Messrs. Black, Calhoun, Cuthbert, Leigh, Moore, Nicholas, Porter, Preston, Walker, White. In the House, February 5, 1836. Mr. Henry L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, submitted the following resolve: Resolved, That all the memorials which have been offered, or may hereafter be presented to this House, praying for the abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia, and also the resolutions offered by an honorable member from Maine (Mr. Jarvis), with the amendment thereto, proposed by an honorable member from Virginia (Mr. Wise), and every other p
e of Whigs: Messrs. Allen, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Henderson, Huger, Johnson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps, Porter, Rives, Simmons, Upham, White, Woodbridge--25. Yeas: From Free States, 13; Slave States, 14. Nays: From Free States, 12; Slave States, 13. and the proposition being returned to the House, the amendment of the Senate was concurred in by 134 Yeas to 77 Nays — a party vote: so the Annexation of Texas was decreed, in the following terms: Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled, That Congress doth consent that the territory properl
of a Republican, if not also of a Douglas, triumph. The Legislature of South Carolina does not regularly meet until the fourth Monday in November; but, the recent act of Congress requiring a choice of Presidential Electors prior to that time, Gov. Gist had good reason for calling the Legislature of 1860 to meet in advance of the regular day. It met, according to his summons, at Columbia, on Monday, Nov. 5 (the day before the choice of Presidential Electors throughout the Union), when Mr. W. D. Porter, of Charleston, was chosen President of the Senate. On taking the Chair, he said: I do not seek now to lift the veil that hides the future from our sight; but we have all an instinctive feeling that we are on the eve of great events. His Excellency, the Governor, in the terms of his call, has summoned us to take action, if advisable, for the safety and protection of the State. Heretofore, we have consulted for its convenience and well-being; now, its destiny, its very existence,
or could be really, conclusively effected. Thousands died fighting under the flag of treason whose hearts yearned toward the old banner, and whose aspiration for an ocean-bound republic --one which should be felt and respected as first among nations — could not be quenched even in their own life-blood. And, on the other hand, the flag rendered illustrious by the triumphs of Gates and Greene and Washington — of Harrison, Brown, Scott, Macomb, and Jackson — of Truxtun, Decatur, Hull, Perry, Porter, and McDonough — was throughout a tower of strength to the Unionists. In the hours darkened by shameful defeat and needless disaster, when the Republic seemed rocking and reeling on the very brink of destruction — when Europe almost unanimously pronounced the Union irretrievably lost, and condemned the infatuation that demanded persistence in an utterly hopeless contest — the heart of the loyal Millions never faltered, nor was their faith shaken that, in spite of present reverses, the
field, Shellabarger, Sherman, Sloan, Spaulding, Stevens, Benj. F. Thomas, Train, Van Horne, Verree, Wallace, Charles W. Walton, E. P. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunlap, Dunn, English, Fouke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Webster, and Wickliffe--48. The bill, thus amended, being returned to the Senate, Mr. Trumbull moved a concurrence in the house amendment, which prevailed by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Browning, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harris, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Sherman, Si
609-10; estimate of the Rebel forces in Kentucky, 615. Pope, Gen.,in Northern Missouri, 587; dispatch to Gen. Fremont, 588; in south-western Missouri, 593. Porter, Col. Andrew, appointed Provost-Marshal of Washington, 619. Porter, Fitz John, testifies for Patterson, 538. Porter, W. D., President of the S. C. Senate, 3Porter, Fitz John, testifies for Patterson, 538. Porter, W. D., President of the S. C. Senate, 330. Port Royal, expedition to, 604 to 606; map of the bombardment, 604; surrender of the forts, 605; Sherman's proclamation; contrabands lock in, 60. Potter, Bishop, prays at Peace meeting, 363. Potter, Major James D., at Bull Run, 545. pound Gap, Ky., the Rebels retreat to, 616. Powell, Lazarus Av., of Ky., proposePorter, W. D., President of the S. C. Senate, 330. Port Royal, expedition to, 604 to 606; map of the bombardment, 604; surrender of the forts, 605; Sherman's proclamation; contrabands lock in, 60. Potter, Bishop, prays at Peace meeting, 363. Potter, Major James D., at Bull Run, 545. pound Gap, Ky., the Rebels retreat to, 616. Powell, Lazarus Av., of Ky., proposes a Committee of Thirteen on the Crisis, 375; 382; 562; 564 Presbyterians, the, and Slavery, 118; 631. Preston, Mr., of S. C., on Abolitionists, 128. Preston, Wm., 509; flees to the Confederacy, 614. Preston, Wm. B., one of Virginia's Commissioners to President Lincoln, 452. Price, Gov. Rodman M., to L. W. Burnett,
d but 12 of ours in all of our front line being available. For a moment only was there hesitation in the attack; when, after an Forts Henry and Donelson. hour's mutual cannonade, a 24-pound shot from the fort pierced the Essex at an unguarded spot, and, tearing through her thick oak planking as though it had been cheese, penetrated her starboard boiler, instantly filling her from stein to stern with burning steam, killing both her pilots at their post of duty, and severely scalding Capt. W. D. Porter and nearly 40 of his gunners and crew. Thus completely disabled, the Essex drifted out of the action, to the great joy of the Rebels, who for a moment thought the victory their own; but her consorts kept on firing and nearing for twenty minutes more, when they were within 600 yards of the Rebel guns, whereof all but four had by this time been silenced: one having burst, disabling every man who served it, while the vent of the great 10-inch columbiad had been closed. rendering it usel
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