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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
e committee was appointed to prepare resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne. A committee, more calculated to inspire the confidence of all sides, could not have been appointed. Numerous as were its members, they were all men of mark, high in the confidence and affections of the country. This committee reported the following resolutions, which were adopted by the meeting:— Resolved, As the opin<
e committee was appointed to prepare resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne. A committee, more calculated to inspire the confidence of all sides, could not have been appointed. Numerous as were its members, they were all men of mark, high in the confidence and affections of the country. This committee reported the following resolutions, which were adopted by the meeting:— Resolved, As the opin<
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Seventh: return to the Senate. (search)
only 90 of the Slave States. Of the poets mentioned in Griswold's Poets and Poetry of America, 122 are of the Free States, and only 16 of the Slave States. Of the poets whose place of birth appears in Read's Female Poets of America, 71 are of the Free States, and only 11 of the Slave States. If we try authors by weight or quality, it is the same as when we try them by numbers. Out of the Free States come all whose works have a place in the permanent literature of the country, —Irving, Prescott, Sparks, Bancroft, Emerson, Motley, Hildreth, Hawthorne; also, Bryant, Longfellow, Dana, Halleck, Whittier, Lowell,— and I might add indefinitely to the list. But what name from the Slave States can find entrance there? A similar disproportion appears in the number of Patents, during the last three years, 1857, 1858, and 1859, attesting the inventive industry of the contrasted regions. In the Free States there were 9,557; in the Slave States, 1,306: making a difference of 8,251 in favo
only 90 of the Slave States. Of the poets mentioned in Griswold's Poets and Poetry of America, 122 are of the Free States, and only 16 of the Slave States. Of the poets whose place of birth appears in Read's Female Poets of America, 71 are of the Free States, and only 11 of the Slave States. If we try authors by weight or quality, it is the same as when we try them by numbers. Out of the Free States come all whose works have a place in the permanent literature of the country, —Irving, Prescott, Sparks, Bancroft, Emerson, Motley, Hildreth, Hawthorne; also, Bryant, Longfellow, Dana, Halleck, Whittier, Lowell,— and I might add indefinitely to the list. But what name from the Slave States can find entrance there? A similar disproportion appears in the number of Patents, during the last three years, 1857, 1858, and 1859, attesting the inventive industry of the contrasted regions. In the Free States there were 9,557; in the Slave States, 1,306: making a difference of 8,251 in favo
sult in regard to this insult to the people. From the Common they marched to the court-house in Harvard Square, and compelled three councilors, Oliver, Danforth, and Lee, and the high sheriff of the county, to resign their offices. On June 16, 1775, orders were given for one thousand men to parade at six o'clock in the evening on the Common, with packs and blankets, and provisions for twenty-four hours, together with all the intrenching tools in the Cambridge camp. That night, Colonel William Prescott, clad in a simple uniform, with a blue coat and three-cornered hat, took command. The men were drawn up in line and marched to the small common on Holmes Place. At a signal, amid profound silence, President Langdon of Harvard College, standing upon the steps of the Holmes mansion, the headquarters of the Committee of Public Safety, offered an earnest prayer for the success of the patriots. He closed as follows: Go with them, O our Father, keep them as in the hollow of Thy hand, co
s, and during his proprietorship books were printed in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, French, Italian, German, and Spanish. Among other books issued at this time may be mentioned Sparks's edition of Washington's Writings, and his American Biography, and Prescott's histories. In 1842 the Press passed into the hands of Charles R. Metcalf, Omen S. Keith, and George Nichols, but within a year or two Mr. Keith retired, and Marshall T. Bigelow entered the firm. In 1859 the firm-name was changed to Welch, . Wentworth became the proprietors, and largely increased the capacity of the Press by adding to it the well-known establishment of John Wilson & Son. During these years many remarkable books were produced. The productions of Holmes, Sparks, Prescott, Ticknor, Palfrey, Judge Story, Quincy, Everett, Hilliard, Dana, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Whittier, Emerson, Lowell, and many others, first issued from this press, gave evidence of its well-earned reputation for accuracy and scholarship. In 189
172, 173; the college offers the use of its grounds to the city, 173. Pine Swamp Field, 4. Pointers, 60. Police Department, 405. Police force, 316. Ponema Tribe, Red Men, 293. Poor's House, the, 17, 276. Population, in 1680, 10; in 1750, 17; in 1765, 17; in 1776, 17, 29; in 1790, 32; in 1810, 32; in 1840, 32; in 1850, 32; in 1895, 59; comparative statement of, 319. Population, density of, 131. Port Bill, 22. Port chucks, 38. Porters, 60. Porter's Tavern. 37. Prescott, Col. William, 49. Printing-press, the first, 8; productions of, 8. Prison Point Bridge, 29. Private Schools in Cambridge, 208-217. Professors' Row (Kirkland Street), 36, 37, 41. Prospect Union, object, 265; name, 265; begins work in the Prospect House, 265; leaders, 265; outgrows its quarters, 265; occupies the old City Hall, 265; classes, 265, 266; teachers, 266; the University's interest in the Union, 266; weekly meetings, 266; lectures, 266; not a charitable institution, 26
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 9 (search)
ch. 10, sect. 796-798, and Shaw's argument when counsel against Prescott, Prescott's Trial, p. 180.) As the Constitution confines the procePrescott's Trial, p. 180.) As the Constitution confines the process of impeachment to cases of official misconduct, and as we do not pretend that Mr. Loring, sitting as a Judge of Probate, has been guilty ofof two thirds of each branch of the Legislature. Then comes William Prescott, a name well known here and the world over. He was a man of Erecise statutes of the Commonwealth, comes the case described by Mr. Prescott, where a judge ought to be dismissed for infirmity ; for we mainde. Nobody objects to this provision, said Mr. Austin. There sat Prescott, Shaw, Webster, Story, Lincoln,--the men whom you look up to as thf Chief Justice Shaw, when he was counsel for the House against Judge Prescott, of Groton, who was removed on impeachment, you will recollect, and for which, therefore, the offender would not be indictable. (Prescott's Case, p. 180.) You may think, Gentlemen, that I have occupied
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
own tired of our parrot note and cold moonlight reflection of older civilizations. Lansdowne and Brougham could confess to Sumner that they had never read a page of their contemporary, Daniel Webster; and you spoke to vacant eyes when you named Prescott, fifty years ago, to average Europeans; while Vienna asked, with careless indifference, Seward, who is he? But long before our ranks marched up State Street to the John Brown song, the banks of the Seine and of the Danube hailed the new life wh man who covers Ireland with regiments to hold up a despotism which, within twenty months, he has confessed rests wholly upon fear. Then note the scorn and disgust with which we gather up our garments about us and disown the Sam Adams and William Prescott, the George Washington and John Brown, of St. Petersburg, the spiritual descendants, the living representatives of those who make our history worth anything in the worlds annals,--the Nihilists. Nihilism is the righteous and honorable res
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Theodore Parker (1860). (search)
horough discipline than the brain of most who deem themselves scholars ever knew. Let us not cheat ourselves with words. But no poor and greedy mechanic, no farm tenant on shares, ever distanced this unresting brain. He brought into his study that conscientious, loving industry which six generations had handed down to him on tile hard soil of Massachusetts. He loved work, and I doubt if any workman in our empire equalled him in thoroughness of preparation. Before he wrote his review of Prescott, he went conscientiously through all the printed histories of that period in three or four tongues. Before he ventured to paint for you the portrait of John Quincy Adams, he read every line Adams ever printed, and all the attacks upon him that could be found in public or private collections. Fortunate man! he lived long enough to see the eyes of the whole nation turned toward him as to a trusted teacher. Fortunate, indeed, in a life so noble, that even what was scorned from the pulpi
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