hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 389 results in 78 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
rs of his Cabinet, Breckinridge, Benjamin, and Reagan, drove rapidly to the train which had been prers of his Cabinet, Breckinridge, Benjamin, and Reagan. He was really accompanied by five members of his Cabinet, Messrs. Benjamin, Mallory, Reagan, Trenholm, and Davis; Gen. Breckinridge was not amth these, under command of Captain Campbell; Mr. Reagan, Postmaster-General, and Colonel William Pre evidence, has appeared the letter of the Hon. John H. Reagan, Confederate Postmaster-General, publn Mississippi knows me. I also talked with Judge Reagan and Colonel Wood on this topic. The impresd I hear anything of the kind mentioned. Judge Reagan and myself had entered into a compact that y presented, telling him of my compact with Judge Reagan. He did escape. The conduct of the capt not one armed man in our camp. Mr. Davis, Judge Reagan, Colonel William Preston Johnston, Colonel all to my mind. A Captain Douglass stole Judge Reagan's saddle, and used it from the day we were
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appeal of the Lee Monument Association. (search)
ng, James R. Chalmers, H. D. Money, H. L. Muldrow, Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi; F. M. Cockrell, D. M. Armstrong, T. T. Crittenden, A. H. Buckner, Benj. J. Franklin, R. P. Bland, R. H. Hatcher, John B. Clarke, Jr., David Rea, J. M. Glover, C. H. Morgan, of Missouri; M. W. Ransom, A. S. Merrimon, A. M. Waddell, A. M. Scales, Joseph J. Davis, Robert B. Vance, J. J. Yeates, Wm. M. Robins, of North Carolina; M. C. Butler, D. Wyatt Aiken, John H. Evans, of South Carolina; J. E. Bailey, Isham G. Harris, John F. House, G. G. Dibrell, Wm. P. Caldwell, W. C. Whitthome, J. D. C. Atkins, Casey Young, J. M Bright, H. Y. Riddle, of Tennessee; Richard Coke, S. B. Maxey, G. Scleisher, D. B. Culberson, R. Q. Mills, J. W. Throckmorton, D. C. Giddings, John H. Reagan, of Texas; R. E. Withers, John W. Johnston, G. C. Walker, Eppa Hunton, John Goode, G. C. Cabell, J. T. Harris, J. R. Tucker, A. L. Pridemore, B. B. Douglas, of Virginia; John E. Kenna, B. F. Martin, Benjamin Wilson, of West Virginia.
civil commotion, and the punishment of the infamous assassins and incendiaries infesting the country, is announced to be the mission of the force in North Missouri. The troops are cautioned against excesses of any kind, especially depredations on the possessions and property of any citizen of Missouri, and infractions of military discipline and good order will be visited with the greatest severity possible under the articles of war.--Washington Republican, August 2.--(Doc. 140.) John H. Reagan, Postmaster-General of the Confederate States, issued a decision, in reference to the transmission and delivery of newspapers and periodicals through the mails in the Southern States.--(Doc. 141.) The Memphis Appeal of this date ingeniously culls various expressions of several northern men to prove that the present war is solely a war of abolition, and that this object long hidden begins now gradually to appear. Among the persons it quotes are, Abraham Lincoln, W. H. Seward, H. J.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.115 (search)
as included. In the party were General John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War; Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State; S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy; John H. Reagan, Postmaster General; General Samuel Cooper, Adjutant General; George Davis, Attorney General; Colonels John Taylor Wood, William Preston Johnston, and Frank Rs falling into the hands of the enemy. We all felt confident that General Breckinridge would not be made prisoner if duty permitted him to attempt escape. As Judge Reagan had been a frontiersman and, as we understood, a Texas Ranger, the men thought his chances good; but all believed that Benjamin would surely be caught, and allhim in his effort to escape, to get far enough away to elude pursuit, Among those who surrendered at the time, besides Mr. Davis's family and the guard, were Mr. Reagan and Colonels Lubbock, Johnston, and Harrison. General Breckinridge and Colonel Wood escaped, and made their way to Florida, whence they sailed to Cuba in an ope
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
erties and rights of.the people by the adoption of a joint resolution declaring the election of delegates to the latter as proper, and recognizing the Convention as a legally constituted body. Governor Houston protested against the assumption of any powers by the Convention beyond the reference of the question of secession to the people. The Revolutionary Convention assembled in the Hall of the House of Representatives, at Austin, on the 28th of January. One of the chief managers was John H. Reagan, a judge, who afterward became the Postmaster-general of the so-called Confederate States of America. McQueen, a commissioner from South Carolina, was there to assist in working the machinery. It was easily managed, for it was so well constructed that there was but little friction. Of the one hundred and twenty-two counties in the State, not one-half were represented. The whole affair was a stupendous fraud upon the people. But what cared the representatives of the Oligarchy for the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
n the 13th, John Gregg, one of the delegates from Texas. appeared The delegation was composed of Louis T. Wigfall, J. H. Reagan, J. Hemphill, T. N. Waul, John Gregg, W. S. Oldham, and W. B. Ochiltree. and took a seat in the Convention, although tecretary of the Treasury; Le Roy Pope Walker, as Secretary of War ; Stephen R. Mallory, as Secretary of the Navy, and John H. Reagan, as Postmaster-General. Afterward, Judah P. Benjamin was appointed to be Attorney-General. William M. Browne, late He was born in Kentucky, and was taken to reside in Mississippi in early boyhood. He was educated at the Military John H. Reagan. Academy at West Point, on the Hudson River; served under his father-in-law, General Taylor, in the war with Mexent as a lawyer. So also was Walker, whose social and professional position in northern Alabama was inferior to but few. Reagan was a lawyer of ability, and was a judge in Texas when he rebelled against his Government. The Confederates, having as
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
, munitions of war, provisions, and other supplies, on their way toward States in which rebellion existed — in other words, establishing a blockade of the Mississippi and the railways leading southward from Kentucky--the Confederates forbade the exportation of raw cotton or cotton yarn, excepting through seaports of the Confederate States, under heavy penalties, expecting thereby to strike a heavy blow at manufactures in the Free-labor States. Act approved May 21, 1861. By an order of John H. Reagan, the so-called Postmaster-General of the Confederates, caused by an order of Postmaster-General Blair for the arrest of the United States postal service in States wherein rebellion existed, after the 31st of May, the postmasters in those States were ordered to retain in their possession, after the 1st of June, for the benefit of the Confederate States, all mail-bags, locks and keys, marking and other stamps, and all property connected with the postal service. The Confederate Congress
tern District, in like manner beat T. N. Waul, the regular Democratic candidate, by 448 Hamilton, 16,409; Waul, 15,961. majority. In the Eastern District, John H. Reagan, Since, Confederate Postmaster-General. Reagan was elected to Congress from Eastern Texas in 1859, by 20,565 votes to 3,541 for Judge W. B. Ochiltree; butReagan was elected to Congress from Eastern Texas in 1859, by 20,565 votes to 3,541 for Judge W. B. Ochiltree; but Houston for Governor had 4,183 majority in the District at that election; showing that Reagan had no serious opposition. Democrat, had no serious opposition. Gen. Houston was thus in a position to thwart the Texan conspirators, had he evinced either principle or courage, when they commenced operating to take their State out ofReagan had no serious opposition. Democrat, had no serious opposition. Gen. Houston was thus in a position to thwart the Texan conspirators, had he evinced either principle or courage, when they commenced operating to take their State out of the Union at the close of 1860. He did refuse to call the Legislature, or a Convention; whereupon the conspirators called the Legislature themselves, by a document signed by sixty of their number, having just as much legal validity and force as a harangue at a negro camp-meeting. But the Disunionists were thoroughly united, det
ry of the Interior ; Edward Bates, of Missouri. Attorney-General; Montgomery Blair, of Maryland, Postmaster-General. Mr. Jefferson Davis, ruling at Montgomery, had already constituted his Cabinet, which consisted of Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secretary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina, Secretary of the Treasury; Leroy Pope Walker, of Alabama, Secretary of War; to which were afterward added Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida, Sec'ry of the Navy; John H. Reagan, of Texas, Postmaster-General. Thus the two Governments stood face to face, holding positions and maintaining assumptions so palpably, utterly incompatible as to necessitate an early collision; and that collision must, in the nature of things, produce a crash that would shake the continent. Still, there was great and wise reluctance, at least on this side, to precipitate or to initiate hostilities. In spite of appearances, President Lincoln, The writer revisited Washington for
mocratic Convention of 1856, 246; a filibuster, 270; statement of with regard to Senator Douglas, 512. R. Rains, Gen., one of Jackson's Brigadiers, 574. Raleigh, N. C., Convention of Southern Governors at, 329; State Rights Convention at, 485. Randolph, George W., one of the Virginia Commissioners to President Lincoln, 452. Randolph, John, of Roanoke, opposes the introduction of Slavery into the North-West Territory, 52; 109; 110; 154; his opinion on the Cuba question, 268. Reagan, John H., of Texas, elected to Congress, 339; a member of Davis's Cabinet, 429. Realf, Richard, John Brown's Sec. of State, 287. Rebellion Record, The, in relation to Belmont, 597. Rector, Gov. Henry M., of Ark., 341. Redpath, James, on John Brown, 282-3; 289. Reed, Dr., of Ind., delegate to the Democratic Convention; favors the Slave-Trade, 316. Reeder, Andrew H., appointed Governor of Kansas, 236; his soundness on the Slavery question asserted by The Union, 236; has a cen
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...