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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
and after passing a few remarks offered a cigar, which was gratefully received. The first step under capitulation was to deliver to the Union army some fifteen hundred prisoners, taken since we left Petersburg, not all of them by my infantry, Rosser's and Mumford's cavalry having taken more than half of them. Besides these I delivered to General Grant all of the Confederate soldiers left under my care by General Lee, except about two hundred lost in the affairs about Petersburg, Amelia Court-House, Jetersville, Rice's Station, and Cumberland Church. None were reported killed except the gallant officers Brigadier-General Dearing, of Rosser's cavalry, Colonel Bostan, of Mumford's cavalry, and Major Thompson, of Stuart's horse artillery, in the desperate and gallant fight to which they were ordered against the bridge-burning party. General Grant's artillery prepared to fire a salute in honor of the surrender, but he ordered it stopped. As the world continues to look at and s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
ess, buckled on his sword with commendable zeal, and came to the field, where he acquitted himself with credit both as an artillery and staff officer. I cordially concur with Brigadier-General commanding in the high praise he bestows on Col. T. L. Rosser, Fifth Virginia cavalry, who, though severely wounded at 2 P. M., remained in command, at the head of his regiment, till the day was won, and night put an end to further operations; on Col. Jas. H. Drake, First Virginia cavalry, who led histry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, Company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, Company K, (specially commended for reckless daring without a parallel). As coming under my own observation, I particularly noticed Colonel T. L. Rosser, of the Fifth, with his habitual coolness and daring, charging at the head of his regiment. Colonel James Drake, of the First, always ready at the right time and place. Colonel T. H. Owen, of Third, begging to be allowed to charge, ag
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
small Federal force on the National road. Generals Colquitt and Rosser have both written to me that General Stuart told them he had been fthe Braddock road. Cox had got to the heights first and confronted Rosser with a portion of his command, while the remainder of it could be plainly seen at the foot of the mountain. General Rosser writes to me that he reported the situation of things to Stuart, who was passing by on the east side of the mountain on his way south. He, Rosser, was not directed to report to me, and I did not suspect his presence. I do notife. After passing through the first belt of woods Garland found Rosser, and, conferring with him, determined to make his stand close to th brigade was too roughly handled to be of any further use that day. Rosser retired in better order, not, however, without having some of his mfarther one had cost Garland his life. It was now intrusted to Colonel Rosser of the cavalry, who had reported to me, and who had artillery a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
self, as it was expressed. On the morning of the 9th Torbert's cavalry moved out to fight that of the enemy under Generals Rosser and Lomax. Merritt's division moved on the pike and extended across to the back road where Custer was concentrated. s Hill. This absence of the enemy's cavalry was accounted for the next morning just before daylight by the appearance of Rosser in the rear of Custer's picket line with his cavalry and one brigade of infantry. Rosser carrying the infantry behind hiRosser carrying the infantry behind his cavalry troopers had made a march of thirty-two miles to capture an exposed brigade of Custer's division on the right; but a change in the arrangements of the command (the return of Torbert) thwarted the scheme, and it resulted only in the capture feat Early's army rested in the intrenchments on Fisher's Hill, but before dawn the next day it retreated to New Market. Rosser, with the Confederate cavalry, acted as rear-guard, and was driven by the Union cavalry beyond Woodstock. While Early re
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.78 (search)
ed the upper part of it.--J. A. E. On the 5th Rosser's brigade arrived, but it did not exceed six hed at New Market with my infantry on the 7th. Rosser pushed forward on the back and middle roads in I halted at New Market with the infantry, but Rosser and Lomax moved down the valley in pursuit, an soon as Gordon should become engaged, and for Rosser to move with his own and Wickham's brigade on ry short time after he started the firing from Rosser on our left and the picket firing at the ford ascertained, he did not receive that message. Rosser had attacked the enemy promptly at the appointthe left, near the back road, held in check by Rosser. The force of the latter was too weak to make the infantry was halted at Fisher's Hill, and Rosser, whose command had retired in good order on th New Market at three o'clock next morning, and Rosser was left at Fisher's Hill to cover the retreathad only about 1200 cavalry on the field under Rosser; Lomax's force, which numbered less than 1700,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
Lomax's division, Maj.-Gen. Lunsford L. Lomax. Imboden's Brigade: 18th Va.----; 23d Va.----; 62d Va.----. McCausland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John McCausland: 14th Va.----; 16th Va.----; 17th Va.----; 25th Va.----; 37th Va. Battalion,----. B. T. Johnson's Brigade: 8th Va.----; 21st Va.----; 22d Va.---; 34th Va. Battalion,----; 36th Va. Battalion,----. Jackson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. H. B. Davidson: 1st Md.----; 19th Va.----; 20th Va.----; 46th Va. Battalion,----; 47th Va. Battalion,----. Rosser's (Fitz Lee's) division, Maj. Gen. Thos. L. Rosser. Wickham's Brigade: 1st Va.----; 2d Va.----; 3d Va.----; 4th Va.----. Rosser's Brigade: 7th Va.----; 11th Va.----; 12th Va.----; 35th Va. Battalion,----. Payne's Brigade: 5th Va.----; 6th Va.----; 15th Va----. artillery, Col. T. H. Carter. Braxton's Battalion: Va. Battery (Carpenter's); Va. Battery (Hardwicke's); Va. Battery (Cooper's). Carter's Battalion: Ala. Battery (Reese's); Va. Battery (W. P. Carter's); Va. Battery (Pendleton'
e enemy's move in the night, I proceeded to execute this order, and, having halted the column near Gatewood's, where Colonels Rosser, Baker, and Goode, with their respective regiments, joined my command, I went forward to reconnoitre. Meeting with ts on the River road below Westover, and, with all arms of service, tried to compel us to retire from that position. Colonel Rosser, commanding Fifth Virginia cavalry, was present in charge of the post, and inspired his men with such determined resithe cavalry operating under my instructions on the Richmond side of the Chickahominy, was under command, at first, of Colonel Rosser, and afterward of Colonel L. S. Baker, first North Carolina cavalry. The latter made a gallant charge, on the thirtidient servant, Fitz Lee, (Late Colonel First Virginia Cavalry,) Brigadier-General, commanding Brigade. Report of Colonel Rosser. headquarters Fifth Virginia cavalry, camp Cary, July 26, 1862. General: In pursuance with your instructions,
ormed, and by the time I reached the spot, Colonel Rosser had accomplished the object, capturing a nls, Fifth Virginia cavalry. The daring of Colonel Rosser's command excited the unreserved praise ofe immediate vicinity of Catlett's after dark. Rosser, being again in front, by his good address and gallantly done under the dashing lead of Colonels Rosser and Brien, over ground exceedingly difficn, and toward night retired upon Manassas, Colonel Rosser protecting his (Ewell's) right flank, and ing so disposed as to cover this movement, Colonel Rosser forming the rear guard to General A. P. Hihis day, (the army facing toward Groveton, Colonel Rosser's cavalry being on our left flank and frone retreat of this party. Colonels Munford and Rosser brought up the rear of General Ewell, and thatt. Upon repairing to that front, I found that Rosser's regiment was engaged with the enemy to the lhe attack. I directed Robertson's brigade and Rosser's regiment to push forward on the extreme righ[6 more...]
is sword with very commendable zeal, and came to the field, where he acquitted himself with credit, both as an artillerist and as staff officers I cordially concur with the Brigadier-General commanding in the high praise bestowed by him on Colonel T. L. Rosser, Fifth Virginia cavalry, who, though severely wounded at two P. M., remained in command at the head of his regiment till the day was won, and night put an end to further operations; on Colonel James H. Drake, First Virginia cavalry, who lellantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, company K, specially commended for reckless daring, without a parallel. As coming under my own observation, I particularly noticed Colonel T. L. Rosser, of the Fifth, and his habitual coolness and daring, charging at the head of his regiment. Colonel James Drake, of the First, always ready at the right time and place. Colonel T. H. Owen, of the Third, begging to be allowed to charge aga
widdie and attack us in heavy force. The enemy then again attacked at Chamberlain's Creek, and forced Smith's position. At this time Capehart's and Pennington's brigades of Custer's division came up, and a very handsome fight occurred. The enemy have gained some ground, but we still hold in. front of Dinwiddie C. H., and Davies and Devin are coming down the Boydton Road to join us. The opposing force was Pickett's division, Wise's Independent Brigade of Infantry, and Fitzhugh Lee's, Rosser's, and W. H. Lee's cavalry commands. The men behaved splendidly. Our loss in killed and wounded will probably number four hundred and fifty men; very few were lost as prisoners. We have of he enemy a number of prisoners. This force is too strong for us. I will hold out to Dinwiddie C. H. until I am compelled to leave. Our fighting to-day was all dismounted. P. H. Sheridan, Major-General. Dabney Mills, March 31, 1865--10.05 P. M. Major-General Sheridan: The Fifth corps h
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