Your search returned 2,937 results in 154 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
the ridge and in plain view from our position. In the afternoon General Newton directed me to swing my left forward, for the purpose of joining the right of General Schofield's corps, which was moving in line down the valley on the east side of Rocky Face, with the view of developing the enemy's works. I found myself unable, however, to join General Schofield's right flank without losing my connection with the left of Harker's brigade, which I was directed to maintain and support him in the event of his making an attack. Adjusting my lines with Harker's left, I moved cautiously upon the enemy's works until the skirmishers of my right regiment became engag east side of the Chattooga Mountain, going into camp near Tilton. On Saturday, the 14th, we again moved forward and formed a junction about 9 a. m. with General Schofield's corps, which was moving upon the enemy, who was found to be intrenched near Resaca. About midday General Newton put his division into position on the lef
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
llery; Capt. Lyman Bridges, Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, as assistant chief of artillery; Capt. Theodore S. Thomasson, First Kentucky Light Battery, inspector of artillery. July 30, Major Osborn was relieved and I was appointed chief of artillery of the corps. July 31, Battery M, First Ohio Light Artillery, was placed in position on General Newton's left front. August 2, one section of the Fifth Indiana Light Battery was placed in position on line formerly held by General Schofield near the Howard house. Opened fire upon Atlanta by order of Major- General Stanley. August 3, the two remaining sections of the Fifth Indiana Light Battery were placed in position near the Howard house. August 5, by order of Major-General Stanley, all the batteries fired into Atlanta once every 15 minutes from meridian until sundown. August 6, by order of Major-General Thomas, the batteries of the corps opened fire upon Atlanta at 4 p. m August 10, the artillery in front of the Third
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
the hum and suppressed noises which usually attend the secret movement of large bodies of troops, and as a consequence anticipates an attack to-night or early to-morrow. In my opinion, assuming an intention on the part of the enemy to attack, Schofield's position on the hill (that lately occupied by Stoneman) is the true object.of their movement. That once firmly in their possession the positions of King and Carlin are at their mercy. Unless the arrangements for its defense have been improved since 6 o'clock this afternoon it will not be held against a strong attack. I have addressed a note to General Schofield on the subject, which goes out with this. Very respectfully, John M. Palmer, Major-General. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland. Itinerary of the Fourteenth Army Corps, May 6-September 8. from monthly returns. The Corps was commanded by Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer to August 6; Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson to August 22, and Bvt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 92 (search)
King's men were actually in the enemy's works, but in consequence of the entanglements few men could reach them and not in sufficient force to hold them. The lines are advanced. King is intrenched beyond the rebel skirmish line of this morning. Baird's line is in advance of its position this morning. The position of Morgan was fully explained this evening. We have lost not far from 500 men, while we have captured about 350 or 400 prisoners. R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General. [Major-General Schofield.] Addenda: report of casualties in Fourteenth Army Corps during operations of August 11, 1864. Zzz R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General, Commanding. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 12, 1864. Report of casualties in the Fourteenth Army Corps during operations of August Zzz Ten deserters received since last report, five of whom have been forwarded. Nothing new to-day, August 15, 1864. R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Fourteenth Army Corps from the 22d of August, on which day I assumed command of it, to the 8th of September, when it went into camp at this place: At the time of assuming command the position of the corps was located on Utoy Creek, and west of Atlanta, and nearly opposite East Point. It was and had been for some days detached from the Army of the Cumberland and was acting under the immediate direction of Major-General Schofield, commanding the Army of the Ohio, in our movements against the enemy's position at East Point. After the receipt of Special Field Orders, No. 57, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, directing the movements of the army against the Macon railroad, the corps was held in readiness until the 26th when, as a preliminary movement, it withdrew from the fieldworks and went into bivouac on the south side of Utoy Creek. This movement was of necessity made during the night, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
y. 31st, nothing of importance occurred worth reporting. August 1, the regiment was ordered out to support Prescott's battery in position on the skirmish line. Constructed works in the evening on a new line, at the point where the picket reserves were last held; loss, I wounded. August 2, were relieved by Sixty-ninth Ohio, and placed in reserve; loss, 2 wounded. August 3, moved to the right about four miles and bivouacked in a line of works partially constructed, and just beyond General Schofield's headquarters. August 4, moved after night some three miles and bivouacked in an open field. August 5, moved early in morning by the flank toward the left. About 3 p. m. orders were received to pass through the works of the Twenty-third Corps, move quietly around an open field just beyond, deploy as skirmishers, and drive in those of the enemy. We succeeded in passing the field without attracting the attention of the enemy. Eight companies were deployed as skirmishers, with two i
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
ark. During the night it passed through the gap and bivouacked early on the 13th near the field-works thrown up by General McPherson's command in the vicinity of Resaca. In compliance with instructions, after a few hours rest, the division took a position in line on the left of the corps in the general advance upon the enemy's position near Resaca. During the night of the 13th the division occupied a position a little in reserve of the left of the corps and connected pickets with Major-General Schofield's right. On the 14th, conforming to the movement of troops on the right and the general plan of advance, the division moved forward from one position to another until the enemy's main lines were reached. The troops on several parts of our lines had become warmly engaged with the enemy during the forenoon, and his main line of battle in front of our right was well developed. In the afternoon, in compliance with orders, I sent Mitchell's brigade to the support of a part of our line
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
om the same source, informing me that Major-General Schofield, whose corps was then in line half, ahe troops of Brigadier-General Judah, on General Schofield's right, came up with my left. His fronht have ensued. It would appear that Major-General Schofield's left, in open ground, did not encouf the hill until after the failure of Major-General Schofield's right and my left had become known,g taken out to operate on the left of Major-General Schofield. I there connected on my right with mn of support upon the right flank of Major-General Schofield's command, to protect, cover, and sushe morning, I received, directly from Major-General Schofield, commanding the Twenty-third Army Corr me might undertake. The order from Major-General Schofield, alluded to above, directed me to mov was 4.30 a. m. when I gave notice to Major-General Schofield that I did not recognize his authoritd promulgated in a lengthy order from Major-General Schofield, issued the night previous, but as th[6 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Narrative. (search)
these days we remained in our position in reserve, no active operations being carried on in our front. May 12, my division, in advance of the corps, marched at daybreak toward the right, to the support of Major-General McPherson, who had passed his army through Snake Creek Gap and had taken position in Sugar Valley, threatening Resaca. Being detained by the Twentieth Corps in advance of me, I did not get into position until after dark. The other divisions of the Fourteenth Corps were behind me, and they were followed by the Twenty-third Corps. May 13, moved forward at noon along with the remainder of the army, and about dark got into position on the left of Brigadier-General Johnson's division, upon a series of steep and difficult hills, covered with a dense wood and undergrowth. Major-General Schofield was somewhere on my left and rear, but not connecting. Brigadier-General Johnson's skirmishers became engaged with those of the enemy, but mine did not come in contact with them.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
om the same source, informing me that Major-General Schofield, whose corps was then in line half, ahout neglecting to advance along with Major-General Schofield, as ordered. I had barely time to gihe troops of Brigadier-General Judah, on General Schofield's right, came up with my left. His fronment of the First Brigade, along with Major-General Schofield's troops, had been so sudden, and thef the hill until after the failure of Major-General Schofield's right and my left had become known,g taken out to operate on the left of Major-General Schofield. I there connected on my right with mn of support upon the right flank of Major-General Schofield's command, to protect, cover, and sus commanding officer. As the order of Major-General Schofield detailed at length operations for allr me might undertake. The order from Major-General Schofield, alluded to above, directed me to movd promulgated in a lengthy order from Major-General Schofield, issued the night previous, but as th[5 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...