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reak it. The Twelfth Louisiana, at the battle of the 20th of July, lost II killed, 57 wounded, and 4 missing, out of 318 engaged. Capt. J. A. Bivin and Lieut. M. S. McLeroy were killed in front of the line. Maj. H. V. McCain was wounded. Lieut.-Col. T. C. Standifer and Sergt.-Maj. H. Brunner were honorably mentioned. After the evacuation of Atlanta Hood designed a campaign to lure Sherman from Atlanta, cut his communications and force a battle further north. On September 25th President Davis arrived at headquarters, and on the next day, after a serenade by the Twentieth Louisiana band, he addressed the soldiers. Three days later the army began its movement northward. In the most serious engagement which followed, that at Allatoona, the Pointe Coupee artillery took part. Slocomb's battery, under Chalaron, did effective work at Dalton. Hood, closely pursued by Sherman, fell back into Alabama, and Sherman returned to Atlanta, burned the city, and set out for Savannah.
rained with Eldridge's battalion, now commanded by Fenner; Bouanchaud's Point Coupee artillery, with Myrick's battalion; Slocomb's Washington artillery, with Cobb's battalion; and Capt. L. M. Nutt's cavalry was with Granbury. Gibson's regiments wd bridges. With Bate's division went Cobb's battalion of artillery, Capt. Rene T. Beauregard commanding the artillery. Slocomb's battery, Lieutenant Chalaron commanding, was directed to open upon a block-house on a creek guarding a railroad bridges, when not fifty yards distant, scattering them in all directions. Of this action, a spirited if hasty one, Bate says: Slocomb's battery, under Lieutenant Chalaron, acted with conspicuous and most effective gallantry. Bate himself seemed genuinely solicitous about his New Orleans artillerists. I have to regret the loss of two of the guns of that gallant battery, Slocomb's. The horses being killed, they could not be brought off. General Bate's regret would surely have turned to rage had he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flag Presentation to the Washington Artillery. (search)
, under the care of a Spanish gentleman known to be in sympathy with the South, until safely returned, some three years after the close of the struggle. And now, officers and soldiers of the Washington Artillery, in the name of General Beauregard, under whose eyes you first went under fire, at Bull Run and Manassas, and—besides your brilliant achievements in fifty-six other battles and engagements—under whom you again distinguished yourselves, on the bloody field of Shiloh, with Hodgson, Slocomb, McVaught, Hewes, and Chalaron, and, later on, at Drewry's Bluff, with Eschleman, W. M. Owen, Richardson, Hero and Norcum, I have the honor to present to you this sacred emblem of Southern valor and patriotism. Its colors are yet as fresh as when it received the parting look of its fair maker. Its value is enhanced by the fact that the upper portion of its staff is made of a piece of the flag-staff of Fort Sumter, shot down by the Confederate gunners, in April, 1861. Unsullied though it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the last campaign of the army of Tennessee, from May, 1864, to January, 1865. (search)
Reminiscences of the last campaign of the army of Tennessee, from May, 1864, to January, 1865. By P. D. Stephenson, Private Piece 4, Sergeant Thomas C Allen, Fifth Company Washington Artillery, Captain C. H. Slocomb, Commanding. Paper no. I. [note by the writer: This is not from a diary. Early after the war, in June, 1865, the writer sat down and began to put on paper, merely for his own future satisfaction, what was still fresh in his memory of that famous last campaign. What is written is from a private's standpoint. Its only merit is sincerity. On the principle that everything may be of use that bears upon the war, it is offered for what it is worth.] After Missionary Ridge. It was whilst we, the shattered remnants of Bragg's army, lay cowering among the hills of Dalton, Ga., in the winter of 1863, that General Joseph E. Johnston came to us and assumed command. He arrived on the 27th of December, and immediately bent all his energies to the almost superhuman
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
William S. Phillips and Joseph S. Cone. Sixtieth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. Ray and Captain J. T. Weaver. Artillery. Major R. E. Graves. Cobb's Battery, Captain Robert Cobb. Mebane's Battery, Captain John W. Mebane. Slocomb's Battery, Captain C. H. Slocomb. Reserve corps. Major-General W. H. T. Walker. Walker's division. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist. Gist's brigade. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist. Colonel P. H. Colquitt. Lieutenant-Colonel L. NapCaptain C. H. Slocomb. Reserve corps. Major-General W. H. T. Walker. Walker's division. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist. Gist's brigade. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist. Colonel P. H. Colquitt. Lieutenant-Colonel L. Napier. Forty-sixth Georgia, Colonel P. H. Colquitt and Major A. M. Speer. Eighth Georgia Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel L. Napier. Sixteenth South Carolina,( Not engaged; at Rome.) Colonel J. McCullough. Twenty-fourth South Carolina, Colonel C. H. Stevens and Lieutenant-Colonel E. Capers. Wilsan's brigade. Colonel C. C. Wilson. Twenty-fifth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel A. J. Williams. Twenty-ninth Georgia, Lieutenant G. R. McRae. Thirtieth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel J. S. Boynton
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
eaver. Artillery. Maj. R. E. Graves. Cobb's BatteryCapt. Robert Cobb. Mebane's BatteryCapt. John W. Mebane. Slocomb's BatteryCapt. C. H. Slocomb. Reserve corps. Maj.-gen. W. H. T. Walker. Walker's division. Brig.-gen. S. Capt. C. H. Slocomb. Reserve corps. Maj.-gen. W. H. T. Walker. Walker's division. Brig.-gen. S. R. Gist. Gist's Brigade. Brig.-gen. S. R. Gist. Col. P. H. Colquitt. Lieut.-col. L. Napier. 46th GeorgiaCol. P. H. Colquitt. Maj. A. M. Speer. 8th Georgia BattalionLieut.-col. L. Napier. 16th South CarolinaCol. J. McCullough. 24th Sou. Douglass' BatteryCapt. J. P. Douglass. Garrity's BatteryCapt. J. Garrity. J. C. Brecktnridge's division. Slocomb's BatteryCapt. C. H. Slocomb. Cobb's BatteryLieut. F. J. Gracie. Mebane's BatteryCapt. J. W. Mebane. Stewart's dCapt. C. H. Slocomb. Cobb's BatteryLieut. F. J. Gracie. Mebane's BatteryCapt. J. W. Mebane. Stewart's division. Standford's BatteryCapt. T. J. Standford. (McD.) Oliver's BatteryLieut. Wm. J. McKenzie. Fenner's BatteryCapt. Charles E. Fenner. Reserve. F. H. Robertson's Battalion. Havis' BatteryLieut. J. R. Duncan. Lumsden's Ba
Artillery. --The following is a list of the officers of the battalion of Artillery, from New Orleans, now encamped at Howard's Grove: Staff.--Major, J. B. Walton; Adjutant, Lieut. W. M. Owen; Surgeon, Dr. E. S Drew; Quartermaster, Lieut. C. H. Slocomb. Non-Commissioned Staff--Sergeant-Major, C. L. C. Dupuy; Color Sergeant, Louis M. Montgomery; Quartermaster Sergeant, Stringer Kennedy. Color Guard.--Corporals George W. Wood, E. J. Jewell, A. H. Peale and J. H. Dearie. First Company.--Captain, H. M. Isaacson; First Lieutenant, J. B. Richardson, Jr.; Second Lieutenant, H. G. Geiger. Second Company--First Lieutenant, C. C. Lewis, commanding; First Lieutenant, Samuel J. McPherson; Second Lieutenant, C. H. Slocomb. Third Company.--Captain, M. W. Miller; First Lieutenant, J. B. Whittington; Second Lieutenant, L. A Adam; First Sergeant, Frank McElroy; Second Sergeant., A. V Hero; Third Sergeant L. Prados; Fourth Sergeant J. T. Handy; First Corporal, E. J. J
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