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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
Duncan, Charles Deakin, Cornelius Cronin, William Wells, Hendrick sharp, Walter B. Smith, George Parks, Thomas Hayes, Lebbeus Simkins, Oloff Smith, Alexander H. Truett, Robert Brown, John H. James, Thomas Cripps, John Brazell, James H. Morgan, John Smith, James B. Chandler., William Jones, William Doolen, James Smith, Hugh Hamilton, James McIntosh, William M. Carr, Thomas Atkinson, David Sprowle, Andrew Miller, James Martin, William Phinney, John Smith, Samuel W. Kinnard, Patrick Dougherty, MicJohn Smith, Samuel W. Kinnard, Patrick Dougherty, Michael Cassidy, George Taylor,,Louis G. Chaput, James Ward, Daniel Whitfield, John M. Burns, John Edwards, Adam McCulloch, James Sheridan, John E. Jones, William Gardner, John Preston, William Newland, David Naylor, Charles B. Woram, Thomas Kendrick, James S. Roan, tree, Andrew Jones, James Seanor, William C. Connor, Martin Howard, James Tallentine, Robert Graham, Henry Brutsche, Patrick Colbert, James Haley, John F. Bickford, Charles A. Read, William Smith, William Bond, Charles Moore, George H.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
r, Wm. G. Temple; Lieutenant, Roderick Prentiss; Assistant Surgeon, A. W. H. Hawkins; Assistant Paymaster, H. L. Wait; Assistant Engineers, Jefferson Young, John Van Vovenberg, Absalom Kirby and J. F. Bingham; Acting-Masters, Wm. Rogers and J. A. Jackaway; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. Sydden and B. M. Chester; Acting-Masters' Mate, H. C. Cochrane. Sloop-of-war Vincennes. Lieutenant-Commander, John Madigan, Jr.; Assistant Surgeon, D. M. Skinner; Second-Lieutenant Marines, N. L. Nokes; Acting-Boatswain, John Smith; Acting-Gunner, Wm. Wilson; Acting-Carpenter, A. O. Goodsoe; Acting-Sailmaker, Nicholas Lynch; Acting-Masters, W. H. Churchill, J. T. Seaver, J. R. Hamilton and O. B. Warren; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. A. Kissam. Steamer Hatteras. Lieutenant-Commander, Homer C. Blake; Assistant Surgeon, E. S. Matthews; Acting-Masters, H. O. Porter, Enoch Brooks and G. D. Hoffner; Acting-Masters' Mates, J. W. Hazlitt, A. H. Berry and T. G. McGrath; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. A. Con
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
C. W. Babbitt; Sailmaker, John Joins. Steamer Keystone State. Commander, Wm. E. Le Roy; Lieutenant Commander, T. H. Eastman, Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Gotwold; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. S. Stimson; Acting-Masters, C. H. Corser, Curtis Redman and L. E. Degn; Acting-Ensign, C. M. Bird; Acting-Master's Mates, J. C. Murphy, J. E. Jones and J. T. Ridgeway; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, A. K. Eddowes; Acting-Second-Assistant, James Doran; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. F. Warburton, John Smith and Pearson L. Fry; Acting-Gunner, David L. Briggs. Steamer Cimmerone. Commander, Maxwell Woodhull; Lieutenant-Commander, B. B. Taylor; Acting-Masters, G. E. Thurston, Edward D. March and Samuel A. Waterbury; Assistant Surgeon, Eugene S. Olcott; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, D. W. Hale; Acting-Master's Mates, John F. Miller, Peter J. Marcoe, Wm. H. Herring and Augustus Lippitt; Engineers: First-Assistant, E. A. C. Du Plaine; Second-Assistant, Reynold Driver; Third-Assistants, G. J. Bur
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
Ordinary Seaman; George Parks, Captain of Forecastle; Thomas Hayes, Lebeus Simkins, Oloff Smith and Alex. H. Truett, Coxswains; Robert Brown and John H. James, Captains of Top; Thomas Cripps and John Brazell, Quartermasters; James H. Morgan and John Smith, Captains of Top; James B. Chandler, Coxswain; William Jones, Captain of Top; William Doolan, Coalheaver; James Smith, Captain of Forecastle; Hugh Hamilton, Coxswain; James McIntosh, Captain of Top; William M. Carr, Master-at-Arms; Thomas Atkinhe Navy Department, No. 10, dated April 3d, 1863, their special signal acts of valor cannot be cited so as to authorize me to recommend their obtaining medals. The following are then honorably mentioned: William Phinney, Boatswain Mate; John Smith, Captain Forecastle; Samuel W. Kinnaird, Robert Dougherty, Michael Cassidy, Landsmen. Sir — I respectfully bring to your attention the following petty officers, etc., of this ship, who evinced in the battle of the 5th instant signal acts
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
rby. Vincennes--Third-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, C. H. Greene; Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Newcomer; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Samuel Jordan; Acting-Masters, A. E. Hunter and L. A. Brown; Acting-Ensign, Robert Henderson; Acting-Boatswain, John Smith; Acting-Gunner, Wm. Kneeland; Sailmaker, Geo. Thomas. Milwaukee--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, James H. Gillis; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, F. John Grover; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, N. Brewster; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. S. Horter, Thos. J. Lennekin; Acting Assistant Surgeon, A. l'anglois; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. C. Sawyer; Acting-Master and Pilot, James Redding; Acting-Ensigns, Haskell Crosby, S. H. Berino and W. B. Pease; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. McKnight, John Smith and Thomas Pindar; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, D. R. Sims; Acting-Second-Assistant, W. M. Stewart; Acting-Third-Assistants, John A. Dalton and J. Moran. Glasgow--Fourth rate. Acting-Master, Richard J. Hoffner; Acting-Master and Pil
ery heavy, as shown by the reports, and have often caused me the more bitterly to regret that I was not permitted to turn Round Top Mountain. The following officers of my staff, most of whom served with me throughout the war, rendered gallant and efficient service, not only in this great battle, but upon many fields where we were thrown together in the heat of action: Colonel W. H. Sellers, Assistant Adjutant General; Colonel E. H. Cunningham, Inspector General; Major B. H. Blanton, Captain John Smith, Captain James Hamilton, Lieutenant E. B. Wade, Aides-de-Camp; Major N. B. George, Quarter Master; Major Jonas, Commissary; and Captain D. L. Sublett, Ordnance Officer, faultlessly discharged their duties in their respective departments. Dr. John T. Darby, Chief Surgeon, distinguished himself by his untiring energy in caring for the wounded; the eminent talent which he displayed in his province, during our struggle, has since deservedly won for him a high position in the medical world
en with him all the books and records of the Army to Macon, but that we had lost, in round numbers, twenty-five thousand (25,000) men. Moreover, that we had, at Adairsville, fifty-three thousand (53,000) infantry. Two of my staff officers, Captain John Smith and Lieutenant E. B. Wade, happened to be present at the time, and gave me, whilst these facts were fresh in their memory, the following affidavits: Houston, Texas, .June 21st, 1865. I certify that on or about the 10th September, 1, was twenty-five thousand (25,000) effective men. He also stated that the Army, when at Adairsville, Ga., numbered fifty-three thousand (53,000) effective infantry, after the losses sustained at Rocky Face Mountain and Resaca, Ga. (Signed) John Smith, Aide-de-Camp. Sworn to and subscribed before me this 22d June, A. D. 1865. (Signed) William Andrews, Mayor of Houston. I certify that on or about the 10th day of September, 1864, Major Kinloch Falconer, late Assistant Adjuta
his hands are without a stain. His name has never been mixed up with disreputable or doubtful transactions. The charges against him are aimed at him solely in his military capacity. And this is not merely negative praise. The life of a soldier is a life of moral danger and exposures, as well as physical; and only the noblest and purest natures entirely escape reproach. I never knew a Warryer yet, but thee, From wine, tobacco, debts, dice, oaths, so free. Thomas Carlton to Captain John Smith. There are no eyes so sharp as the eyes of hatred; and now, for two long years, has General McClellan been watched and scanned by these, in hope to find some speck or flaw in his record; but vain has been the quest, fruitless the search. As a shield of steel dazzles and blinds the eye, so does the spotless purity of his character repel the envious and sinister glance. No slanderer, however base, no courtier, however fawning, has ever dared to accuse him of intemperance, licentiousnes
have been killed, and our officers are confident the number is much larger. The boats then returned to the ship, arriving there about daylight. But, sir, I am grieved to report that this brilliant affair was not unattended by loss on our side. I have to report as killed by shots from the cross-trees of the schooner, while the boats were approaching, boatswain's mate Charles H. Lamphere and John R. Herring, seaman and captain of the howitzer, two of the best men in our ship; and marine John Smith — the first man to board the schooner, and who behaved most gallantly — was, by a sad mistake, having lost his distinguishing mark, killed by one of our own men. We have wounded, probably mortally, seaman R. Clark and E. K. Osborne; severely, nine other seamen. Captain Reynolds received a severe contusion on his shoulder, and midshipman Higginson had the end of his thumb shot off. Lieutenants Russell and Blake had narrow escapes, the flesh of each being grazed by one or more musket balls.
command of Col. Woodford, who subsequently fell in one of the battles of the Revolution. No spot in Virginia is invested with more thrilling romance and historic interest than Hampton and its immediate vicinity. It was visited in 1607 by Capt. John Smith, then an Indian town called Kccaughtan. Here Smith and his party were regaled with corn cakes, and exchanged for them trinkets and beads. The locality was settled from Jamestown in 1610, and was incorporated a century afterward as the townSmith and his party were regaled with corn cakes, and exchanged for them trinkets and beads. The locality was settled from Jamestown in 1610, and was incorporated a century afterward as the town of Ye Shire of Elizabeth city. The Episcopal church, an ancient pile made of imported brick, is the oldest building in the village, and probably, from its isolated location, may have escaped the late conflagration. It is the second oldest church in the State, and is surrounded by a cemetery filled with countless marble marks of the dead. Scattered through it may be found, at intervals, stones with armorial quarterings, designating the resting-place of honored ancestry. Some of these are
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