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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
f great wood fires and the good cheer of a delicious supper banished from the good old general every thought of war, as he looked over the rich viands and array of luxuries before him, and contrasted them with the mess pork, hard tack, cush, sweet potato coffee, slapjacks, hoppina — john and hoppin-jinny and all the horrible makeshifts of food he had endured for months in camp at the front. What a feast it was! Genuine coffee from Mrs. Seddon's, sugar from Mrs. Morson's and sorghum from Mrs. Stanard's. For the first time in many months the general laid his head on snowy pillows and tucked himself away, at midnight, in a Christian bed, with linen, lavender-scented sheets, and warm, soft blankets, to dream of days gone by, when, at his own home by the sea, in time of peace, with oysters, terrapin and canvasback ducks for the feast, judges, statesmen and even presidents had been his guests. He sank to rest, in fancy hearing the sound of salt waves at his tidewater home, and the sighing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
s Roman as he. What one in Judea or the seven-hilled city sent seven spears to victory for Joshua or David—for Scipio or Caesar? Yet this Christian mother of the South hear the thunder of hostile guns without one tremor, nursed her children, torn by their shells, without repining, but with perfect trust in the hand of the One Dispenser. Mrs. Charles Thompson Haskell (Sophia Langdon Cheves, daughter of Colonel Langdon Cheves) had seven sons in the army around Richmond when I met her at Mrs. Stanard's, in one of the several visits she made to tend their wounds. All of them had been privates in the army before the firing on Sumter. She was ever quiet, but genial, hiding what suspense and anguish held her, making, unknowingly, great history for her State and for all time. The eldest son was Langdon Cheves Haskell, who served on the staff of General Maxey Gregg, later on the staff of General A. P. Hill, and surrendered at Appomattox as captain on the staff of Fighting Dick Anderson
the Thomas Artillery Company will be mustered into service on Friday morning next. All persons wishing to join must apply before that time. Philip B Stanard, Captain. my 8--6t.
the Thomas Artillery COMPANYwill be mustered into service on Friday morning next. All persons wishing to join must apply before that time. Philip B Stanard, Captain. my 8--6t
taff at "Camp Page," near Williamsburg. As a matter of conscience, Dr. McCabe could not remain in a Diocese where the use of the prayer for the President of the United States was required, by ecclesiastical rescript, when his native State had resumed her sovereignty. He is well known throughout the country, as a contributor to the literary and religious press of the day, either under his own name or his nom de plums, "Oats." His degree of D.D. was conferred by old William and Mary, and, in addition to his present appointment, he is the Chaplain elect of the University of Virginia, when that noble institution, shall resume her regular session. His only son left the University of Virginia to take his place in the Howitzers, under the command of Maj. Randolph, and is now in Capt. Stanard's Company, No. 8, at Yorktown, Dr. McCabe will meet with many old friends and acquaintances, who will greet his return to his native State and to her service, in the vicinity in which he is located.
and historical allusions, was enriched by an inexhaustible fund of pleasant anecdote, and sparkled with genial humor. We never knew a man of higher or sterner integrity; he pursued the right with an unswerving and uncompromising fidelity. Punctuality in every engagement, and strict method in all things, were prominent traits in his character, exhibited not only in the profession to which he had devoted the larger portion of his manhood, but in the new pursuit, of agriculture, to which he turned his attention when he abandoned a lucrative practice, and left our city some ten or twelve years since. He leaves behind him few or none of his contemporaries. He was the cherished companion of Wickham, of Leigh, Johnson, Stanard, Patton and Watson, and it is surely praise enough to say that he adorned even this association and contributed his full share to the interest of that attractive circle, which shone resplendent with genius, intellect and wit, and was never clouded by excess.
bers, our eyes to rest upon even far different scenes from those which met us by moon-light. The Howitzers had struck their tents and were far down to the Peninsula. A few straggling soldiers, here and there, met the eye; some detained by sickness, others by business. The Major's (now Colonel's) headquarters were alone left to tell us of the departed. Two noble men whom I had known and loved from early boyhood, during my absence had been laid in a soldier's grave. The noble-hearted Stanard, who commanded the third Howitzer company, and my beloved friend, Reynold Kirby, had paseed away from earth, both in the prime and vigor of an early manhood. Everything about Yorktown has undergone a change. New soldiers have been moved rapidly into the places of those who are farther down the Peninsula, and scarcely a familiar face met us. Col. Colquitt now commands the post in place of Gen. Hill, who has been transferred to the defence of his own State. We did not see General M
, some 1,200 yards to the northward. In reply to the play of the enemy's batteries, our own artillery had not been Idle or unskillful. The ground occupied by our guns, on a level with that held by the batteries of the enemy, was an open space of limited extent, behind a low induration, just at the eastern verge of the plateau, some 500 or 600 yards from the Henry House. Here, as before said, 13 pieces, mostly six-pounders, were maintained in action. The several batteries of Imboden, Stanard, Pendicton, (Rockbridge Artillery,) and Alburns's, of the army of the Shenandoah, and five guns of Walton's, and Heaton's section of Roger's battery, of the army of the Potomac, alternating to some extent with each other, and taking part as needed; all from the outset displaying that marvellous capacity of our people, as artillerists, which has made them, it would appear, at once the terror and the admiration of the enemy. As was soon apparent, the Federalists had suffered severely fro
ts, on Main street, was sold recently, at auction, by Goddin & Apperson, for $18,650 per tenement. Two vacant lots, lying on the upper and lower side of the above, was sold at the same time, for the respective sums of $250 and $200 per front foot. Mrs. Stanard has sold her house for $37,000 to Wm. H. Macfarland, who has sold his house to Tyler, of the firm of Mitchell & Tyler, for $22,000. Mrs. Stanard has bought the residence of Peachy R. Grattan for $17,000, and Mr. G. goes to the country. ts, on Main street, was sold recently, at auction, by Goddin & Apperson, for $18,650 per tenement. Two vacant lots, lying on the upper and lower side of the above, was sold at the same time, for the respective sums of $250 and $200 per front foot. Mrs. Stanard has sold her house for $37,000 to Wm. H. Macfarland, who has sold his house to Tyler, of the firm of Mitchell & Tyler, for $22,000. Mrs. Stanard has bought the residence of Peachy R. Grattan for $17,000, and Mr. G. goes to the country.
The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1862., [Electronic resource], Stuart cavalry Again in the enemy rear. (search)
command of Lieut. Col. Thornton which was in the advance that day, was ordered to draw sabre — the 1st squadron, under Capt. Berkeley to pursue the wagon train, and the rest of the regiment to charge the rear of the main body. Most antly did they perform their work, turning to the right and left as they came to the church. Capt Berkeley overtook and captured the entire party of wagons and men, after a gallon of a couple of miles. Col. Thornian overtook and charged the tear guard near Mrs. Stanard's, four miles from the church capturing several wagons and some prisoners. The 9th, under command of Col. W. H. F. Lee. with two pieces of cannon, moved on after the 3d, to not as a reserve. The prisoners confirmed the accounts received, and placed the strength of the expedition at ,000. They stated that Burnside arrived in Fredericksburg on Tuesday evening, his command having preceded him, and that there were 20,000 men in the place. After remaining at the church for four hours
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