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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
emen were still at a distance. Lee did not vacillate. He did not yield his judgment to Longstreet. The latter's fault was not argumentative opposition, but practical disobedience of orders. There were two separate acts in this disobedience. Neither of these was committed in Lee's presence. Both were perpetrated when Lee and Longstreet were far apart. Longstreet countermanded the order for the early march before he reached Lee's headquarters; later in the day he bade his divisions pause and wait for Laws' brigade, after Lee's departure to another post upon the field. In both cases Longstreet could advance the nominal excuse that he was only exercising the discretion usually accorded to a corps commander in the absence of the general-in-chief. His use of that alleged discretion, together with the improvident use of the same prerogative on the part of Stuart, A. P. Hill and Ewell, combined together to inscribe Gettysburg in the annals of the Southern Confederacy as a lost field.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
tted to quote the whole of his splendid oration. The foregoing extract, however, will suffice to show the spirit in which the dominant element of that great convention approached the consideration of the grave problem which confronted them. From the day of its opening session, on the 13th of February, down to the 17th of April, the advocates of secession and of union confronted each other in debate. Foremost among the Union men were John B. Baldwin, Robert Y. Conrad, Jubal A. Early, Alex. H. H. Stuart, George W. Summers, Williams C. Wickham, and the president, John Janney. Right to secede. Of the 152 members of the convention there were probably few who did not hold to the constitutional right of a State to retire from the Union; but, as I have said, a majority were opposed to the exercise of that right, and clung tenaciously to the hope that the alternative would never be put to Virginia—either to draw her sword to coerce the States of the Southern Confederacy, or withdraw f
bbard, Hughes, Hull, Jackson, P. C. Johnston, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, MacFARLANDarland, Maslin, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Orrick, Osburn, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Pugh, Rives, Saunders, Sharp, Sitlington, Spurlock, Staples, A. H. H. Stuart, C. J. Stuart, Taylor, Waller, White, Wickham, Willey, Wilson, and Woods.--77. nays.--Messrs. Janney, (President,) Ambler, Armstrong, Blakey, Boissean, Borst, Bouldin, Bruce, Cecil, Chambliss, Chapman, Conn, R. H. Cox, Fisher, Flournoy,y, Marshall, Marr, Marye, Maslin, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Orrick, Osburn, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Rives, Saunders, Robert E. Scott Sharp, Sheffey, Sitlington, Slaughter, Southall, Speed, Spurlock, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Taylor, Tredway, Waller, white, Wickham, Willey, and Woods--95. nays.--Messrs. Ambler, Blakey, Boissean, Borst, Cecil, Chambliss, Chapman, Conn, R. H. Cox, Fisher, Graham, Gregory, John Goode, Jr. , Thos. F. Goode,
ly, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Grant, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, Aderson Hall, Ephraim B. Hall, Bammond, Haymond, Hege, Holladay, Hughes, Hull, Jackson, Marmaduke Johnson, Peter C. Johnston, Lawson, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, James B. Mallory, Marshall, Marr, Marye, Sr., Maslin, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Osburn, Parks, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Eyes, Saunders, Sr., Robert E. Scolf, Sharp, Sheffey, Sillington, Southall, Spurlock, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers, , Tarr, Taylor, Tyler, Waller, Whitfield, Wickham, Willey, Wilson, and Wysor--92. So the Convention refused to lay the resolution on the table. The question then being on the adoption of the resolution. Mr. Wise said he objected to the resolution, not because he wished to withhold any tribute from the distinguished gentleman, but that (among other considerations) he had been selected from among the many who had been exerting themselves in beh
ew, McNeil, Macfarland, C. K. Mallory, J. B. Mallory, Marshall, Marr, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Osburn, Parks, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Robt. E. Scott, Sharp, Sheffey, Sitlington, Slaughter, Spurlock, Staples, A. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers, Sutherlin, Tarr, Tayloe, Waller, Whitfield, Wickham, and Willey.--85. Nays.--Messrs. Ambler, James Barbour, Blakey, Boisseau, Borst, Bruce, Cecil, Coffman, Coun, Richard H. Cox, Fisher, Graham, John Goode, J, Charles K. Mallory, James B Mallory, Marshall, Marr, Marye, Sr, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Orrick, Osburn, Parks, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Robert E. Scott, William C. Scott, Sharp, Sheffey, Sitlington, Slaughter, Southall, Speed, Spurlock, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers, Sutherlin, Tarr, Tayloe, Tredway, F. B. Turner, Tyler, Waller, Whitfield, Wickham, Willey, and Wilson.--91. The Committee then took a recess until 4 o'clock P. M.
ubbard, Hughes, Jackson, Janney, Marmaduke Johnson, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, NcNeil, Macfarland, Marshall, Masters, Moffett, Nelson, Orrick, Osbourn, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Price, Pugh, R. E. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington, Spurlock, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers, Tarr, Tayloe, Wickham, and Willey. --61. Mr. Flournoy then moved to further amend by striking out the words "when no symptoms of domestic insurrection appear, but;"--at the suggestion of Mr. Wise, however, anney, P. C. Johnston, Kilby, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, Marshall, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Orrick, Osburn, Parks, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, R. E. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington, Slaughter, Southall, Spurlock, Staples, A. H. H. Stuart, C. J. Stuart, Summers, Sutherlin, Tarr, Tayloe, Tredway, Waller, White, Whitfield, Wickham, and Willey.--80. Mr. Brown, of Preston, moved to amend the resolution by striking out the words "during its continuance; and upon the separatio
acfarland, Marshall, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Osburn, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Robert R. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers, Tarr, Tayloe, Waller, White, Wickham, Willey, and Wilson.--75 The question recurring on Mr. Sutherlin's amendment, it was son, Orrick, Osburn, Parks, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Robt. E. Scott, Wm. C. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington. Southall, Spurlock, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers. Tarr, Tayloe, Waller, White, Whitfield, Wickham, and Willey. -- This vote having defeated the substitute, Mr. Wise moved r, Preston, Price, Pugh, Randolph, Richardson, Robert E. Scott, William C. Scott, Sharp, Sheffey, Sitlington, Slaughter, Southall, Speed, Spurlock, Staples, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers, Sutherlin, Tarr, Tayloe, Thornton, Tredway, Robert H. Turner, Franklin P. Turner, Tyler, Waller, White, Whitfield, Wickham, Wil
Janney, Marinaduke Johnson, Peter C. Johnston, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Marshall, Maslin, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Osburn, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Rives, Robert E. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington, Spurlock, Alex. H. H. Stuart, Chap'n. J. Stuart, Summers, Tarr, Tayloe, White, Wickham, and Willey.--71. Mr. Wise then moved to amend the resolution by striking out the words at the end thereof--"disclaim power to recognize the withdrawal of any State from the Uni Aston, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Boggess, Brown, Burdett, Burley, Byrue, Campbell, Carlile, Carter, Couch, Custis, Dent, Early, E. B. Hall, Hubbard, Hughes, Jackson, Lewis, McGrew, Masters, Moore, Osburn, Patrick, Porter, W. C. Scott, Sharp, A. H. H. Stuart, C. J. Stuart, Summers, Tarr, and Willey.--24. Nays.--Messrs. Ambler, Armstrong, A. M. Barbonr, Blakey, Blow, Boissean, Borst, Bouldin, Boyd, Branch, Brent, Bruce, Cecil, Chambliss, Coffman, Conn, C. B. Conrad, R. Y. Conrad, R. H. Cox,
Gone to Washington. --The Virginia Commissioners appointed to confer with old Abe on the state of the country--Messrs. william Ballard Preston, Alex. H. H. Stuart, and George W. Randolph — left Richmond yesterday morning for Washington to perform the mission with which they were on trusted. In view of the rather belligerent intelligence received yesterday, both from the South and North, it is hoped that the conference they propose to have with the President will avall to prevent the shedding of fraternal blood. The City was visited by a high wind yesterday. Luckily it found no dust to blow into people's eyes. No through train from Washington arrived in the afternoon, the wind having blown the water out of the Potomac to such a degree that the mail boat was unable to approach her wharf. P. S.--We have been informed since the above was written, by Conductor Gentry, that the oldest inhabitant never heard of or saw such a storm of wind and rain as occurred at Acquia Cre
Important from Washington.Lincoln's Interview with theVirginia Commissioners.policy of the Administration. We learn from Washington that the Commissioners appointed by the Virginia Convention had a "pleasant interview" with President Lincoln last Saturday morning, at nine o'clock. The President's reply was given in writing as follows: Hon. Messrs. Preston, Stuart and Randolph: Gentlemen-- As a committee of the Virginia Convention, now in session, you present me a preamble and resolution in these words. "Whereas, in the opinion of this Convention, the uncertainty which prevails in the public mind as to the policy which the Federal Executive intends to pursue toward the seceded States, is extremely injurious to the industrial and commercial interests of the country, tends to keep up an excitement which is unfavorable to the adjustment of pending difficulties, and threatens a disturbance of the public peace: Therefore. "Resolved, That a committee of three delegates be
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