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ing fugitives from Slavery Abolishes Slavery in the District of Columbia Lincoln proposes, and Congress enacts, compensated Emancipation Prohibits Slavery in the Territories Confiscates the slaves of Rebels opens Diplomatic intercourse with Liberia and Hayti requires Equality in education and punishment between Whites and Blacks right of search on the African coast conceded fugitive Slave act repealed confinement of suspected slaves in Federal Jails forbidden coastwise Slave-trade fors; and, being approved by the President, July 17., became the law of the land. President Lincoln having recommended, in his first Annual Message, Dec. 3, 1862. the establishment of Diplomatic intercourse with the republics of Hayti and Liberia, Mr. Sumner reported Feb. 4, 1863. to the Senate, from its Committee on Foreign Relations, a bill for that purpose; which in due time was taken up, April 22. supported by its author, opposed April 24. by Mr. G. Davis, of Ky., who procla
m returning fugitive slaves, 257; an act against Slavery passed by, 261-2; classification of Representatives in, 254; Rebel slaves freed by act of, 263; Hayti and Liberia recognized by, 265; in relation to rendition of fugitive slaves. 267; Lincoln proposes National aid to emancipation, 259; law of evidence in favor of colored mene of his army, 745. Lee, Gen. Fitz Hugh, encounters Gregg, 393. Legareville, S. C., transport captured near, 465. Lewisburg, Va., fights at, 140; 403. Liberia and Hayti recognized, 265. Liddell, Col., killed at Antietam, 210. Liddle, Gen., at Chickamauga, 417. Lightfoot, Col., killed at Fair Oaks, 148. Linco reply to Emancipationists, 251; his proclamations of Freedom, 253; proposes aid to emancipation, 259; on slave colonization, 2.57; as to recognition of Hayti and Liberia, 265; on the Habeas Corpus, 490 to 492; to the Ohio Democracy, 493; replies to Gov. Seymour on the Draft, 508; on protecting negro soldiers, 525; amnesty proclama
ted States, in the temporary command of Lieut. I). M. Fairfax, U. S. N., who was ordered to await at Fernando Po, the arrival of Capt. Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. On the 26th of August, Capt. Charles Wilkes took command of this ship, Lieut Fairfax returning to his former position as executive officer. We left Fernando Po on the 20th August, cruising close to the shore for the purpose of ascertaining if any of the Confederate privateers had taken any prizes to that coast. Arrived at Monrovia, Liberia, on the 12th, and at St. Vincent, Cape Verd, on the 25th September. Seeing by the papers, that several Confederate privateers had run the blockade, and taken several prizes in the West India Islands, Capt. Wilkes determined to cruise about these islands, and to capture some of them before returning with the San Jacinto to New York. We arrived at St. Thomas on the 10th of October, and found the Powhatan and Iroquois there. On the 11th, the British brig Spartan arrived in port; her master
ng instituted for such violations. The repugnance of many good citizens to the institution was shown in all the States by wills made to free slaves, or by manumission during their lives. Washington, John Randolph, of Roanoke, Virginia, and John G. Palfrey, of Louisiana, are notable examples of the surrender of large property in slaves under the impulse of such sentiments. There were also colonization societies formed for the purpose of exporting the negroes to Africa, and the colony of Liberia was established to receive them. Of course colonization did not weaken the institution, for in every slave State more slaves were born in a week than the colonization societies could have exported to Africa in a year even if they could have got them for nothing. Slavery had been forbidden in the northwest territory by what was known as the Dane ordinance. Then it was foreseen that the lower branch of Congress would very soon have representatives in such majority, as to do anything agai
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Appendix C, p. 31. (search)
be all from the United States, is sometimes stated as high as forty thousand, and is constantly referred to, at the South, as showing the great number of fugitives. But it must be remembered that the manumissions far exceed in number the escaping fugitives. I learn from Mr. Kennedy that while in 1860 the number of fugitives was but 803, that of manumissions was 3,010. As the manumitted slaves are compelled to leave the States where they are set free, and a small portion only emigrate to Liberia, at least nine-tenths of this number are scattered through the northern States and Canada. In the decade from 1850 to 1860, it is estimated that 20,000 slaves were manumitted, of whom three-fourths probably joined their brethren in Canada. This supply alone, with the natural increase on the old stock and the new comers, will account for the entire population of the province. A very able and instructive discussion of the statistics of this subject will be found in the Boston Courier of
he Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that theeption of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
rd practically exemplifying your belief in the words of your great founders: All men are created free and equal. You have procured the liberation of the slaves in the district around Washington, and thereby made the centre of your Federation visibly free. You have enforced the laws against the slave-trade, and kept up your fleet against it, even while every ship was wanted for service in your terrible war. You have nobly decided to receive embassadors from the negro republics of Hayti and Liberia, thus forever renouncing that unworthy prejudice which refuses the rights of humanity to men and women on account of their color. In order more effectually to stop the slave-trade, you have made with our Queen a treaty, which your Senate has ratified, for the right of mutual search. Your Congress has decreed freedom as the law forever in the vast unoccupied or half unsettled Territories which are directly subject to its legislative power. It has offered pecuniary aid to all States which
a,Cr. 1770. gals.1770. gals. April 22.To 1 hogshead of rum110April 22.By 1 woman-slave110 May 1.To rum130May 1.By 1 prime woman-slave130 May 2.To 1 hogshead rum105May 2.By 1 boy-slave, 4ft. lin105 May 7.To 1 hogshead rum108May 7.By 1 boy-slave, 4ft. 3in108 May 5.To cash in gold5oz. 2.May 5.By 1 prime man-slave5oz. 2. May 5.To cash in gold2oz.    May 5.To 2 doz. of snuff1oz.May 5.By 1 old man for a Lingister3oz. 0.   ----3oz. 0.    How will the above read in the capital of Liberia two hundred years hence? In 1754, there were in Medford twenty-seven male and seven female slaves, and fifteen free blacks; total, forty-nine. In 1764, there were forty-nine free blacks. When the law freed all the slaves, many in Medford chose to remain with their masters; and they were faithful unto death. List of slaves, and their owners' names. Worcester,owned byRev. E. Turell. PompeyDr. Simon Tufts. RoseCaptain Thomas Brooks. PompCaptain Thomas Brooks. PeterCaptain Franc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ashmun, Jehudi, 1794- (search)
Ashmun, Jehudi, 1794- Missionary; born in Champlain, N. Y., in April, 1794; was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1816, and prepared for the ministry. He was sent with a reinforcement to the colony of Liberia in 1822, where he acted as legislator, soldier, and engineer in constructing fortifications. He had a force of only thirty-five men and boys, with which he repulsed an attack of 800 natives. His wife died, and he, weakened by fevers, was compelled by broken health, to sail for home. ith a reinforcement to the colony of Liberia in 1822, where he acted as legislator, soldier, and engineer in constructing fortifications. He had a force of only thirty-five men and boys, with which he repulsed an attack of 800 natives. His wife died, and he, weakened by fevers, was compelled by broken health, to sail for home. A fortnight after his arrival in Boston, Mass., he died, Aug. 25, 1828. He had made the settlement in Liberia orderly and permanent during the six years he was there.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Centennial Exhibition, (search)
ional government issued invitations to all foreign nations having diplomatic relations with the United States to participate in the exhibition by sending the products of their industries. There was a generous response, and thirty-three nations, besides the United States, were represented—namely, Argentine Republic, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chili, China, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, India and British colonies, Hawaiian Islands, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Liberia. Luxemburg Grand Duchy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Orange Free State, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Santo Domingo, Spain and Spanish colonies, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunis, Turkey, and Venezuela. A Woman's executive committee was formed, composed of Philadelphians, who raised money sufficient among the women of the Union for the erection of a building for the exhibition exclusively of women's work—sculpture, painting, engraving, lithography, literature, telegraphy, needlework of all kinds
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