hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 54 results in 27 document sections:

1 2 3
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 1: the organization of the 121st New York Volunteers (search)
pringfield, Otego and Roseboom. Company F. Edminston, Exeter, Unadilla, Otego and Maryland. Company G. Cherry Valley, Roseboom, Decatur, Middlefield, Westford, Worcester and Herkimer. Company H. Little Falls, Richfield, Salisbury and Otego. Company I. Milford, Laurens, Morris, Worcester, Pittsfield, Hartwick and German Flats. Company K. Laurens, New Lisbon, Oneonta, Burlington, Otego, Butternuts, Pittsfield and Plainfield. A camp for the regiment was selected across the Mohawk River from Herkimer on German Flats, and named Camp Schuyler. The contract for this camp-site reads as follows: Headquarters Camp Schuyler, August 29, 1862. This agreement, made this 25th day of July, A. D. 1862, between Albert Story, on behalf of the State of New York, as Quartermaster, and Henry J. Schuyler, witnesseth that the said Schuyler has leased for the season certain grounds, being a portion of his farm in the township of German Flats, for the purpose of allowing the same to b
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
e haunted with the idea that he would, after all, return to Utica, and once more see those he loved; and yet he also seemed to me like one whose days were numbered, and the surgeon had told me, after repeated counsels with his professional brethren, that it was next to impossible to save his life, and that I must not expect it. All the while I clung to the belief that some vitality of faith, or love, or hope, or patriotism, or divine aid, would still send that boy back to the banks of the Mohawk. I saw another nervous twitch around the temples. I felt his pulse. It was an indication of hope, or sudden death. The surgeon came by again. That boy has wonderful vitality, he said, as he looked at his face. Whether it was purely my fancy, my hope, or a fact, I did not know, but twilight seemed to pass over his face. Yes, yes—I—I—wait—a moment. Oh, I shall not die! He opened his eyes calmly, and then a glow which I shall never forget suffused his cheek, and, lifting his
e haunted with the idea that he would, after all, return to Utica, and once more see those he loved; and yet he also seemed to me like one whose days were numbered, and the surgeon had told me, after repeated counsels with his professional brethren, that it was next to impossible to save his life, and that I must not expect it. All the while I clung to the belief that some vitality of faith, or love, or hope, or patriotism, or divine aid, would still send that boy back to the banks of the Mohawk. I saw another nervous twitch around the temples. I felt his pulse. It was an indication of hope, or sudden death. The surgeon came by again. That boy has wonderful vitality, he said, as he looked at his face. Whether it was purely my fancy, my hope, or a fact, I did not know, but twilight seemed to pass over his face. Yes, yes—I—I—wait—a moment. Oh, I shall not die! He opened his eyes calmly, and then a glow which I shall never forget suffused his cheek, and, lifting his
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
with their very fair verse, and their conventional and generalized descriptions of scenery that might as well be English as American. It is interesting to note, however, that the native element in our descriptive verse grows more pronounced in the decade preceding the first work of Bryant. The form is still that of Thomson, but the poet has at last opened his eyes to the distinctive beauty of American nature. In his Descriptive poems (1802) John D. McKinnon wrote of the Hudson and the Mohawk Rivers and our own October landscape, as well as of tha illimitable plain Depastured by erratic buffaloes; and some Untaught Bard, writing under the influence of both Thomson and Young, in his Spring clearly foretells the coming of Thanatopsis. John Hayes, professor at Dickinson College, in the 2500 lines of blank verse of his Rural poems (1807) celebrates American birds and flowers in spite of his imitation of Milton and Thomson. Still more interesting in this respect is The Foresters (18
Ilion, Herkimer County, New York a town of 3,000 pop., on Mohawk River, New York Central Railroad and Erie Canal, 11 miles from Utica. Engaged in various manufactures.
Little Falls, Herkimer County, New York a town of 6,000 pop., on Mohawk River and the New York Central Railroad, 20 miles from Utica. The falls in the river furnish immense power. Considerable manufacturing is done here.
Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York a town of 4,000 pop., on Mohawk River, 33 miles from Albany, and on the Utica and Schenectady Railroad. Engaged in manufactures.
1 2 3