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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 8 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Stonewall Jackson in the Valley. Such is the view of southern thinkers, to-day; and it is backed by the clearest judgment and calmest criticism of the North. That success was made the test of merit; that attrition at last wore away unre-enforced resistance; that highest honors in life, and national sorrow in death, were rewards of a man — truly great in many regards, if justly measured; all these are no proof that General Grant was either a strategist, or a thinker; no denial that his Rapidan campaign --equally in its planning and its carrying out — was a bald and needlessly-bloody failure! And, realizing this at the supreme moment, can it be wondered that the people of Richmond, as well as the victorious little army, grew hopeful once more? Is it strange that-mingled with thanksgivings for deliverance, unremitting care of the precious wounded, and sorrow for the gallant dead of many a Virginia home-there rose a solemn joyousness over the result, that crowned the toil, the
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Run. (search)
Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Run. After McClellan had been safely housed at his new base on James River, Major General John Pope, of the United States Army, made his appearance in Northern Virginia, between the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers, at the head of an army called the Army of Virginia, and composed of the corps of McDowell, Banks, and Fremont, the latter being then under Sigel. General Pope issued a vain-glorious address to his troops, in which he declared that he had never seen anything of the rebels but their backs; and he talked largely about making his headquarters in the saddle, and looking out for the means of advancing, without giving thought to the lines of retreat, which were to be left to take care of themselves. He certainly was producing great commotion in the poultry yards of the worthy matrons, whose sons and husbands were absent in the service of their country, when General Lee sent Stonewall Jackson to look after the redoubtable warrior. After remaini
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 20: battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
r front, to cloak a more serious move in some other quarter, and so it turned out to be. When this was discovered, it is quite probable that we might have destroyed the comparatively small force on the south bank by a movement against it from our line, but this would not have compensated us for the loss we would, in all probability, have sustained from the enemy's heavy guns. General Lee had ascertained that by far the largest portion of Hooker's army had crossed the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers above their junction, and were moving down on his left. He therefore determined to move up with the greater part of his own army to meet that force, which was watched by Anderson's division of Longstreet's corps and a portion of Stuart's cavalry. Accordingly late on the afternoon of the 30th I was instructed by General Jackson to retain my position on the line, and, with my division and some other troops to be placed at my disposal, to watch the enemy confronting me while the remainder
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 27: on the Rapidan. (search)
nce, before it could reach me it became entirely dark, so as to put a stop to all further operations that night. Very early next morning I advanced towards the station, but the enemy was found to have made good his retreat during the night. I then halted my division, and moved on to Manassas Junction with a regiment, in order to reconnoitre, picking up some stragglers on the way. The enemy was found to have crossed Bull Run and taken position behind it. Our cavalry advanced up to the Run and had some skirmishing with the enemy, but our army did not make any further movement forward. We then proceeded to destroy the bridge over Broad Run and Kettle Run and to tear up the railroad, burning the cross-ties and bending the rails by heating them. On the march from Rapidan, Brigadier General Pegram, who had been assigned to the command of Smith's brigade, joined us, General Smith, who had been elected Governor of Virginia, having resigned at the close of the Pennsylvania campaign.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 28: devastation of the country. (search)
rear of Brandy Station, Ewell's corps occupying the right, with its left, my division, resting on the road to Culpeper Court-House, and Hill's corps occupying the left, with his right connecting with my left. In this position we awaited the advance of the enemy all day, but he made no attack on us, though there was some fighting on Hill's left with the enemy's cavalry. Being now in a very unfavorable position, and having no good line to occupy in Culpeper, we fell back that night to the Rapidan, and next morning crossed over and occupied our old positions. Meade's army also occupied very much the same positions it had previously occupied, and the line of pickets on the Rapidan was re-established. While we were in Culpeper on this occasion we discovered that Meade's army had almost entirely devastated that county. Many beautiful residences of gentlemen had been pulled down, and some within sight of Meade's own headquarters, for the purpose of making huts for the soldiers and
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 31: from the Rapidan to the James. (search)
1: from the Rapidan to the James. On the 3rd of May, 1864, the positions of the Confederate Army under General Lee, and the Federal Army under Lieutenant General Grant in Virginia, were as follows: General Lee held the southern bank of the Rapidan River, in Orange County, with his right resting near the mouth of Mine Run, and his left extending to Liberty Mills on the road from Gordonsville (via Madison CourtHouse) to the Shenandoah Valley; while the crossings of the river on the right, and he right, Hill's on the left, and two divisions of Longstreet's corps were encamped in the rear, near Gordonsville. Grant's army (composed of the Army of the Potomac under Meade, and the 9th corps under Burnside) occupied the north banks of the Rapidan and Robinson rivers; the main body being encamped in Culpeper County and on the Rappahannock River. I am satisfied that General Lee's army did not exceed 50,000 effective men of all arms. The report of the Federal Secretary of War, Stanton,
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
's Hill, 241, 242 Pughtown, 240, 244, 246 Quaker Church, 140, 374, 476 Quincy, 254 Raccoon Ford, 106, 302 Radford, Colonel R. C. W., 24 Radford, Lieutenant Colonel, 454 Raines, General, 61, 62, 64 Ramseur, General, 345-46, 361, 372, 374, 376, 383-389. 392, 396-97, 399, 402, 406, 408, 413, 420-430, 434, 440, 444-452, 456 Randolph, Captain, W. F., 188, 322 Randolph, Secretary General, 77 Ransom, General, 82, 149, 152, 156. 375-77, 380, 384, 386, 399, 400 Rapidan River, 56, 92-93, 102, 105- 106, 113, 196, 237, 285-86, 302, 303, 343-45, 351, 364 Rapidan Station, 303, 306, 317, 326 Rappahannock, 56. 63, 92, 102, 104, 106, 131, 133, 154, 165, 166-67, 196, 215, 217, 236, 285-86, 303, 307, 343 Rappahannock Academy, 184 Red Bud Run, 420, 423, 425 Redoubts, 59-64, 66, 68 Reno, General (U. S. A.), 106, 112, 131 Reynolds, General (U. S. A.), 132, 201, 266 Richardson, Capt. H., 187 Richardson, General (U. S. A.), 149, 151 Richards
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
ught from Richmond was added another which had previously served in the Valley, and was commanded by General Beverley Robertson, which consisted of the Second, Sixth, Seventh, Twelfth, and Seventeenth Battalions of Virginia cavalry. Having detached a regiment under Munford to operate on the left of the army, Stuart crossed the Rapidan on the 20th with Fitz Lee's brigade and the remainder of Robertson's, and proceeded at once to drive the Federal cavalry from out of the section between the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers, across the latter stream. Lee now began to extend his left, and on the 22d and 23d Jackson moved up the Rappahannock River to the Warrenton Springs ford. Stuart started on his mission, crossing at Waterloo Bridge, a point above Warrenton Springs, and, moving by way of Warrenton, reached the vicinity of Catlett's Station, twelve miles in Pope's rear, after dark. The rain fell in such torrents and the night was so dark that it was not possible for him to damage the
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
ld nevertheless generally express dissatisfaction with whatever victories were gained because they were not more complete. That portion of the Army of the Potomac not engaged in guarding lines of communication was on the northern bank of the Rapidan. The Army of Northern Virginia confronting it on the opposite bank of the same river, was strongly intrenched and commanded by the acknowledged ablest general in the Confederate army. The country back to the James River is cut up with many strforce possible against the Confederate armies in the field. There were but two such, as we have seen, east of the Mississippi River and facing north. The Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee commanding, was on the south bank of the Rapidan, confronting the Army of the Potomac; the second, under General Joseph E. Johnston, was at Dalton, Georgia, opposed to Sherman who was still at Chattanooga. Beside these main armies the Confederates had to guard the Shenandoah Valley, a great s
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXII. November, 1863 (search)
rn-meal, which he will sell to poor families at the following rates: one bushel, $16; half bushel, $8; one peck, $4; half peck, $2. November 16 Governor Brown, Georgia, writes the Secretary that he is opposed to impressments, and that the government should pay the market price — whatever that is. And the Rhett politicians of South Carolina are opposed to raising funds to pay with, by taxing land and negroes. So indicates the Mercury. We have news to-day of the crossing of the Rapidan River by Meade's army. A battle, immediately, seems inevitable. November 17 A cold, dark day. No news. It was a mistake about the enemy crossing the Rapidan-only one brigade (cavalry) came over, and it was beaten back without delay. Vice-President Stephens writes a long letter to the Secretary, opposing the routine policy of furloughs, and extension of furloughs; suggesting that in each district some-one should have authority to grant them. He says many thousands have died by bei
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