hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 79 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 4: our first campaign.--battle of Fair Oaks. (search)
of the company) said, Ben, I am astonished. Well, said Ben, it is not my fault; I have been on guard, but I will get just as full as the rest as soon as I find the stuff. When the time came to march all were in fair condition, and before we reached Bolivar Heights, as good as ever. As it was the first offence the men were let off with a lecture from the captain, and as the opportunity was never again presented, the offence was not repeated. With Captain Devereaux, who joined us at Muddy Branch, came more recruits, and the regiment was now full, Company A having had for a few days one hundred and two enlisted men, several of the old men were discharged, bringing us down to the required number. A fine band was attached to the regiment, and having become very well drilled in the manual, our dress parades were almost perfect, and were witnessed by nearly all the soldiers and citizens in the town. March 24 we received marching orders. Crossing the river we took cars at Point of
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 6: removal to Muddy Branch. (search)
Chapter 6: removal to Muddy Branch. After the return of the command to Camp Benton from Ball's Bluff, a reorganization of the regiment took place. Capt. Moses the regiment was ordered, on December 4, 1861, to Seneca, at a place called Muddy Branch, some miles nearer Washington, where it relieved some of the command of Gen.ius, ingenuity and perseverence of the men of Massachusetts. In moving to Muddy Branch, the regiment, with the exception of Company C, marched to Edward's Ferry antwo weeks this company was ordered to join the regiment at Camp Lander, near Muddy Branch. Their first work was the procuring of logs from the camps that had just bealem Zouaves and brother of Lieut. Col. Devereux. This company arrived at Muddy Branch on December 13, 1861, bringing with it 125 men. Its complement was but 101, days at distant points and the men grew impatient to go forward. While at Muddy Branch, the adjutants of regiments were ordered to instruct the color sergeants in
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. (search)
Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. The evenings at headquarters were often interesting. There was plenty of time to study, discuss and exemplify the tacticbut slipped into the lock in crossing. During the stay of the regiment at Muddy Branch, there were numerous changes in the roster. Q. M. S. Oliver F. Briggs, of C of building defensive blockhouses; Capt. James D. Russell, of Company D, at Muddy Branch Lock, building the defensive blockhouse between Muddy Branch and Seneca and Muddy Branch and Seneca and Second Lieut. Samuel Baxter was with him. Capt. Edmund Rice, of Company F, had charge of the picket line on the Potomac River at Seneca Lock, while Second Lieut. DudlW. Bachelder, of Company C, was made the Acting Regimental Adjutant while at Muddy Branch, from January 4th, during the absence of First Lieut. John P. Reynolds, on lrch 24. It rained steadily all the time, and the streets, cut up by the constant passage of heavy teams, were reduced to a condition rivaling those at Muddy Branch.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 16: the march down the Peninsula. (search)
quarters, 19TH Regt. Mass. Vols. Camp near Alexandria, Va., August 29TH, 1862. To His Excellency, John A. Andrew, Governor of Massachusetts, Sir: The condition of this regiment requires three hundred and thirty-two (332) men to fill it to the standard. I respectfully request that number of men may be forwarded as speedily as possible. Very respectfully, A. F. Devereux, Lieut. Col. Commanding. On the bottom of this letter was written the following: Headquarters near Muddy Branch, Md. September 7TH, 1862. Governor: The above mentioned number of recruits are required to fill our regiment to maximum on paper, but six hundred recruits will be required to fill it to the maximum in the field, as we have a large number absent (wounded, sick, etc.,) who will never rejoin us. E. W. Hinks, Colonel, 19th Mass. Vols. Fresh from the trials of the Chickahominy and the Seven Days Retreat, the men of the Nineteenth were a rough looking lot. The contrast between them and
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
. June 30, ‘65. Kelly, James, priv., (F), Aug. 26, ‘61; 28; disch. disa. Dec. 23, ‘62. Kelly, James, priv., (D), Aug. 26, ‘61; 18; died Dec. 24, ‘61, near Muddy Branch, Md. Kelly, James, priv., (B), Mar. 4, ‘64; 24; Vet. 9th M. V.; see 9th regt.; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Kelly, James, priv., (K), June 2, ‘64; 21; sub. Martin Webber,ah, priv., (I), Aug. 10, ‘61; 18; disch. Mar. 26, ‘65; pris. June 22, 1864 to Feb. 26, ‘65. Kelley, John, priv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 35; died Dec. 13, ‘61, Muddy Branch, Md. Kelley, John E., priv., (F), July 25, ‘61; 33; disch. disa. Mar. 10, ‘63. Kelly, John F., priv., (B), Feb. 27, ‘64; 18; M. O. June 30, ‘65 as Mus. Kelly, Jt. 3, ‘62; 26; wounded Dec. 13, ‘62; transf. to V. R.C. Sept. 26, ‘63. Potter, Benj. F., priv., (D), July 25, ‘61; 31; died Jan. 1, ‘62 of disease, Hosp. Muddy Branch, Md. Powell, James, priv., (H), Nov. 10, ‘61; 22; disch. disa. Feb. 12, ‘63. Powers, Edward, priv., (H), Aug. 12, ‘61
................................... 285 Mortimer, Charles,................................................... 293 Mortimer, Lewis,.................................................. 331, 341 Morton, Philip,....................................................... 292 Moses, John,......................................................... 286 Moses, John D.,....................................................... 145 Moynehan, P.,....................................................... 108 Muddy Branch,.................................................. 43, 49, 50 Mudgett, Isaac N.,........................................... 348, 353, 356 Mulligan, Michael,............................................. 293 Mumford, Dudley C.,....... 5, 8, 51, 151, 201, 261, 265, 295, 299, 317, 322, 355 Murphy, Andrew M., (K),............................................. 75 Murphy, Daniel,...................................... 288, 293, 352, 358, 368 Murphy, Edward (A),.............................
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. After our defeat at Manassas came the creation of the Army of the Potomac. I shall touch brieflrels as a chimney outside the tent at the other. But what were tents in such days and nights of rain and wind on that Muddy Branch? Our tents were often prostrated, our encampment a mass of shapeless canvas. On the second of November we were treat our hospital tents filled with men suffering from the measles, now an epidemic, contributed to the dismal miseries of Muddy Branch. It was about this time, too, that the fleet sailed for South Carolina, to make a first attempt at landing: every bla On Tuesday morning, the third day of December, we turned our backs willingly upon the dismal camp at Seneca Creek and Muddy Branch, and, making that day seventeen and one half miles, encamped at night at the small town of Barnsville, en route to Fre
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
24. Occupies Harper's Ferry, 26, 27, 30 et seq. Letters of complaint from some of its men to friends at home, and responses thereto to General Gordon, 32-34. Its first engagement and incidents of, 38. Leaves Harper's Ferry and occupies Darnstown, Md., 48, 49 et seg. A case of discipline in, 50-53. Observes day of .fasting and prayer appointed by the President, 58. Impatient waiting of its officers and men for active service, 61, 62, 173. Ordered to Conrad's Ferry, 62-64. In camp, at Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek, 81-86 ; at which place it experiences a hurricane, 83, -and also much sickness, 84-86. In winter quarters at Frederick, Md., 87 et seq. Incidents and scenes of camp-life, 88, 89, 91, 107, 108, 149-151. A second time at Harper's Ferry, 102,--and thence to Charlestown, Va, 104, etseq. Foraging in, 104, 118, 119. Marches to Winchester, 116, 117. United to a new brigade, General Gordon as commander, 120. Pursues Stonewall Jackson, 134 et seq. In camp at Edenburg, 136,--
y thousand men marched up a hill and then marched down again. We returned to camp at noon; but our troubles did not end here. Gen. Lee was now fairly launched on his great invasion of the North, and our isolated position seemed one fraught with much danger. Now and then the sound of distant cannonading told of cavalry contests between opposing armies as both were pressing northward, but we could hear nothing definite about what was actually taking place. Four days after the raid at Muddy Branch, or Seneca, the centre section was summoned from the Ferry. We threw up rifle-pits on Benson's Hill (our first experience in this kind of engineering, which paled before our later efforts), and kept everything packed ready to move at a moment's notice. Some of us packed up superfluous clothing and conveniences, and expressed them home by way of Adamstown. Night after night the harnesses were placed on the horses, and at 3 o'clock in the morning we were turned out, sleepy and cross, to
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
30, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, B5 Mount Sterling, Ky. 118, 1; 135-A; 141, D3; 171 Mount Vernon, Ala. 110, 1; 135-A Mount Vernon, Ark. 154, B7; 171 Mount Vernon, Ind. 150, A2; 151, G3 Mount Vernon, Ky. 9, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 141, G2; 150, C12 Mount Vernon, Mo. 47, 1; 119, 1; 135-A; 152, D4; 160, C12; 171 Mount Washington, Ky. 150, A9; 151, F10 Mount Zion Church, Va. 76, 5; 87, 4; 93, 1; 94, 2 Fort Mouton, Ala.: Plan 108, 3 Muddy Branch, Md. 7, 1; 27, 1; 100, 1 Muddy Creek, Tenn. 149, C1 Muddy River, Ky. 150, D5 Muddy Run, Va. 16, 1; 23, 4, 23, 5; 44, 3; 74, 1; 85, 3; 87, 2; 100, 1; 137, B6 Mud Lake, Nev. Ter. 120, 1; 171 Mud River, W. Va. 140, H6; 141, C7 Mudtown, Ark. 10, 2 Mulberry Creek, Kans. 119, 1 Mulberry Point, Va. 18, 1, 18, 2; 19, 4, 19, 5; 93, 1; 100, 1; 137, G10 Reconnaissance, May 7-8, 1862 19, 4, 19, 5 Mulberry River, Ark. 160, H11 Muldraugh's
1 2 3