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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 38 4 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 28 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 20 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 6 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 16 12 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 3 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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nessee with the Eastern and Southern States, by operating from the Tennessee River, between Crump's Landing and Eastport, as a base, I determined to foil his designs by concentrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them, chiefly regiments from Louisiana, soon reached this vicinity, and with two divisions of Gen. Polk's command from Columbus, and a fine corps of troops from Mobile and Pensacola, under Maj.-Gen. Bragg, constituted the army of the Mississippi. At the same time, Gen. Johnston, being at Murfreesboro, on the march to form a junction of his forces with mine, was called on to send at least a brigade by railroad, so that we might fall on and crush the enemy should he attempt an advance from under his gunboats. The call on Gen. Johnston was promptly complied with. His entire force was also hastened in this direction,
ed successes in many encounters on our way, and all conscious of the righteousness of their country's cause. The arrival of Major-Gen. Van Dorn, on the second of March, in the camp of the enemy, was the occasion of great rejoicing, and the firing of forty guns. The rebel force was harangued by their chiefs with boastful and passionate appeals, assuring them of their superior numbers and the certainty of an easy victory. Despatches were published, falsely announcing a great battle at Columbus, Ky., in which we had lost three gun-boats and twenty thousand men; and thus the rebel hordes were assembled — the occasion was now open to drive the invaders from the soil of Arkansas, and give a final and successful blow for a Southern Confederacy. The fifth of March was cold and blustering. The snow fell so as to cover the ground. No immediate attack was apprehended, and I was engaged writing. About two o'clock P. M., scouts and fugitive citizens came, informing me of the rapid appro
wounding fourteen men. March 18.--General Pope repulsed the gunboat fleet at New-Madrid. A rebel transport, loaded with cannon, reported sunk by the fire from the fleet. March 19.--Commodore Foote reports the island harder to conquer than Columbus. Firing continued night and day. March 20.--Cannonading continued all day. All the guns but one in the upper battery reported dismounted. Hollins's ram sent from Memphis. March 21.--Firing continued at intervals. March 22.--But littleet of transports nine or ten first-class boats, whose owners will not be very apt to present their bills monthly. The fortifications are admirably constructed and of immense strength. The rebels commenced building them before they came up to Columbus; the breastworks are well settled and firm. Served by brave men in a better cause, they would have held the river much longer than three weeks. But these fellows could not stand our gunboats on both sides of them, and thirteen-inch bombshells i
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