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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
Richmond April 4 (Detachment). Scout from LaGrange, Tenn., into Mississippi April 10-11 (Detachment). James' Plantation, near New Carthage, April 8 (Detachment). Dunbar's Plantation, Bayou Boeuf. April 15 (Detachment). Expedition from Perkins' Plantation to Hard Times Landing April 25-29. Fort Pillow April 26. Phelps' and Clark's Bayous April 26. Choctaw Bayou, on Lake Bruin, April 28. Turning Grand Gulf April 25-30 (4 Cos.). Battle of Port Gibson May 1. Willow Springs May 3 (Co. C ). Near Black River May 5 (Detachment). Sandy Creek May 5 and 9 (Detachment). Utica May 9 and 10 (Cos. A and E ). Coldwater May 11. Raymond May 12 (Cos. A and E ). Hill's Ferry May 13 (Detachment). Jackson May 14 (Cos. A and E ). Walnut Hill May 15. Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Haines Bluff May 23 (Detachment). Mechanicsburg May 29 (Detachment). Expedition to Satar
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., April 13. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson May 1 (Reserve). Jones' Cross Roads and Willow Springs May 3. Forty Hills and Hankinson's Ferry May 3-4. Battle of Raymond May 12. Jackson May 14. Battle of Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Surrender of Vic Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., April 13. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson May 1 (Reserve). Jones' Cross Roads and Willow Springs May 3. Battles of Raymond May 12; Jackson May 14; Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Duty there till September 13. Movement to Memphi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
o January, 1863. Reconnoissance from Lagrange November 8-9, 1862. Duty at White's Station and Memphis, Tenn., till February, 1863. Expedition to Yazoo Pass by Moon Lake, Yazoo Pass and Coldwater and Tallahatchie Rivers February 24-April 8. Operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, La., April 13-15. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1. Jones' Cross Roads and Willow Springs May 3. Battles of Raymond May 12; Jackson May 14; Champion's Hill May 16; Big Black River May 17. Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Mechanicsburg May 26-June 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Garrison duty at Vicksburg till September 12. Moved to Helena, Ark., September 12, thence to Memphis, Tenn., and Corinth, Miss., and march to Chattanooga, Tenn., October 6-November 20. Operations on Memphis & Charleston Railr
Commanding 17th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, December, 1862, to April, 1864, and as escort to Gen. McPherson, Commanding Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1864, then as escort to Headquarters 17th Army Corps to May, 1865, participating in the movement to Young's Point and Milliken's Bend, La., and operations against Vicksburg, Miss., February to July, 1863. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30. Battles of Port Gibson May 1; North Fork, Bayou Pierrie, May 3; Willow Springs May 3; Utica May 9-10; Raymond May 12; Jackson May 14; Champion's Hill May 16. Siege of Vicksburg May 18-July 4. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2, 1864. Champion's Hill February 4. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Battle of Resaca. Battles about Dallas May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River J
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
17, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 22, 1; 92, 1; 100, 2; 135, 3 Williamsport, La. 135-A; 155, H5; 156, A5 Williamsport, Md. 25, 6; 27, 1; 42, 5; 43, 7; 69, 1; 81, 4; 82, 3; 85, 1, 85, 8; 116, 2; 135-A; 136, D6 Vicinity of, 1863 42, 5 Williamsport, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 118, 1; 149, A5 Willamston, N. C. 135-A; 138, D9, Willis' Church, Va. 92, 1; 100, 2 Williston, S. C. 80, 3; 86, 3; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 143, F9; 144, B9 Willow Creek, Oreg. 134, 1 Willow Springs, Miss. 36, 1; 155, D7 Will's Creek, Ala. 149, F9 Willstown, S. C. 139, H3; 143, H12; 144, D12 Will's Valley, Ala. 48, 1; 118, 1; 149, G8 Wilmington, N. C. 25, 5; 76, 2; 105, 8; 117, 1; 118, 1; 132, 1; 135-A; 139, C10; 171 Approaches 132, 1 Intrenchments, etc., 1863 25, 5 Operations before, Feb. 9-22, 1865 105, 8 Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, N. C. 25, 5; 105, 8; 138, G6; 139, A9 Wilmington Island, Ga. 70, 2; 120, 2; 133, 3; 1
across the bayou and attack the enemy in flank, and in full retreat through Willow Springs, demoralized and out of ammunition. McPherson started at once, and beforver the retreating force. McPherson followed rapidly, driving them through Willow Springs, and gaining the cross-roads. Here Logan was directed to take the Grand Guordered to hold the position with one division, from the Big Black river to Willow Springs, and McClernand, on his arrival, to join in this duty. McClernand was alof the garrison. Accordingly, on the morning of the 3d, Grant started from Willow Springs in person, with one brigade of Logan's division, and a cavalry escort of twerson, closely followed by Mc-Clernand, on the branch of the same road from Willow Springs. . . . The road to Vicksburg is open. . . . It had already become apparelack river; McClernand kept to the right, and moved direct by the road from Willow Springs, while Sherman followed with his corps divided on the two roads, and closel
s accomplished, a bridge and roadway (over a hundred and twenty feet long) made, and the whole of McPherson's two divisions marched over before night. This corps then marched to the north fork of Bayou Pierre, rebuilt a bridge over that stream, and was on the march by five and a half A. M. to-day. Soon after crossing the bayou, our troops were opened on by the enemy's artillery. It was soon demonstrated that this was only intended to cover the retreat of the main army. On arriving at Willow Springs, General McPherson was directed to hold the position from there to the Big Black with one division, and General McClernand, on his arrival, to join him in this duty. I immediately started for this place with one brigade of Logan's division and some cavalry (twenty men). The brigade of infantry was left about seven miles from here; contrabands and prisoners taken having stated that the last of the retreating enemy had passed that point. The woods, between here and the crossing of the Bi
g night, as a consequence of the victory at Port Gibson, the enemy spiked his guns at Grand Gulf, and evacuated that place, retiring upon Vicksburg and Edward's station. The fall of Grand Gulf was solely the result of the victory achieved by the land forces at Port Gibson. The armament and public stores captured there are but the just trophies of that victory. Hastening to bridge the south branch of Bayou Pierre, at Port Gibson, you crossed on the morning of the 3d, and pushed on to Willow springs, Big Sandy, and the main crossing of Fourteen-mile creek, four miles from Edward's station. A detachment of the enemy was immediately driven away from the crossing, and you advanced, passed over, and rested during the night of the 12th, within three miles of the enemy in large force at that station. On the morning of the 13th, the objective point of the army's movement having been changed from Edward's station to Jackson, in pursuance of an order from the commander of the department,
kept up the fight during the day, making what Grant pronounced a very bold defense and well carried out, holding the 20,000 Federals in check until evening, when they withdrew across the bayou and burned the bridges. In this battle of Port Gibson, the Mississippi troops engaged, aside from the Sixth regiment, were mainly in Baldwin's brigade, which reached the field exhausted by a long march, fought on the left, retired through Port Gibson at nine o'clock at night, and fell back toward Willow Springs. The Fourth regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Adair, bore the severest part of the conflict. The casualties of Bowen's little army in this battle were 60 killed and 340 wounded. Among the killed, unfortunately, was Gen. E. D. Tracy. The Federal loss was much more severe-131 killed, 719 wounded and 25 missing; but they were compensated to some extent by capturing 387 men, mainly from Green and Tracy. Bowen held his position on Bayou Pierre during the next day, but was not reinforced.
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
. Leaving Pemberton to keep a useless watch over the crossings of the Big Black, which he had no idea of disputing, Grant started to ascend the east side of this river, ready to turn either to the left or to the right according as the troops from Vicksburg or those from Jackson offered him a favorable opportunity for battle. He rested his left, formed by McPherson, upon Hankinson's Ferry; McClernand, on the right and in the rear, extended his lines from Bayou Pierre to the village of Willow Springs. The expedition he was about to undertake required considerable preparations. Supplies of every kind, especially of food, were forwarded from Milliken's Bend to Hard Times by a road about sixty-four miles in length, transported thence by water to Grand Gulf, then sent after the army in wagons which had crossed the river and upon conveyances picked up in the country. McArthur's division of the Seventeenth corps, which had remained on the right bank, was charged to protect the trains wh
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