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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ven now. It was once a post for the coronation retirement of a statesman, when he had earned the supreme honors of the state. In times of peace our great public men found their legitimate way to the Home of the Presidents—as Washington wished to have the White House called. Those honors then were always worthily won, and the laurel wreath kept green on the brows of all their wearers,—at least till the last of the primitive chieftains went to his untroubled rest under the shades of the Hermitage. Yes, those men lived to reap the rich rewards of peace after their battles; of repose after their toils. But it was no pillow of down on which Abraham Lincoln was invited to lay his head. He thought he understood something of what had been committed to him; and when he stood on the eastern portico of the Capitol, all blanched before the surging, sea of anxious men and women who were waiting to learn What of the night? would bring from the new sentinel, he uttered words to which th
ven now. It was once a post for the coronation retirement of a statesman, when he had earned the supreme honors of the state. In times of peace our great public men found their legitimate way to the Home of the Presidents—as Washington wished to have the White House called. Those honors then were always worthily won, and the laurel wreath kept green on the brows of all their wearers,—at least till the last of the primitive chieftains went to his untroubled rest under the shades of the Hermitage. Yes, those men lived to reap the rich rewards of peace after their battles; of repose after their toils. But it was no pillow of down on which Abraham Lincoln was invited to lay his head. He thought he understood something of what had been committed to him; and when he stood on the eastern portico of the Capitol, all blanched before the surging, sea of anxious men and women who were waiting to learn What of the night? would bring from the new sentinel, he uttered words to which th
h, after some delay from a misunderstanding of orders, Early marched for Waynesboro, the enemy having gone thither by way of Staunton. The trains crossed South river at Patterson's ford and went up the east side of that stream, with Ramseur in front, followed by Gordon. Pegram marched on the right flank by the Waynesboro road, from Mt. Meridian, turning by the Dogtown road, five miles from Waynesboro. Early, with Kershaw's division, followed by Gordon, marched by the way of New Hope and Hermitage, striking the outpost of the Federal cavalry at the latter place and driving it in toward Dogtown. Pegram also encountered the enemy, about four miles from Dogtown, and drove them to that place, then formed a line, after dark, and pursued them to the Waynesboro and Staunton road and toward Fishersville, the Confederate cavalry having previously gone, by a byroad, to near the tunnel of the Virginia Central railroad through the Blue ridge, which the Federal cavalry was seeking to destroy, a
sant Hill, La., assistant surgeon. Melvin E. Williams, Mansfield, La., assistant surgeon Anderson's Texas cavalry. Edward L. Hamilton, Richmond, Ark., surgeon Tappan's brigade. Milton McD. Marcus, Homer, La., surgeon Ross' Second dismounted infantry. William A. Hardy, Alexandria, La., examined for promotion. September, 1864, Military Medical Board sitting at Camden, Ark.: Robert A. Benton, Camden, Ark., surgeon appointed by secretary of war, May, 1861, Camden hospital. James C. Ford, Hermitage, Mo., assistant surgeon Moore's Missouri infantry. Thomas Benjamin Hopkins, Homer, La., assistant surgeon Reid's Arkansas Second dismounted cavalry. Thomas S. Petty, Chapel Hill, Tex., surgeon Madison's Texas cavalry. October, 1864, Military Medical Board sitting at Camden, Ark.: Francis D. Hallonquist, Gilmer, Tex., surgeon Bonner's Eighteenth Texas infantry. Peter G. Sigmund, Eudora, Ark., assistant surgeon McNeil's Louisiana cavalry. Matt. A. Jolly, Mt. Hebron, Ala., chief surgeon Whar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
ieutenant-General A. P. Hill. [from the Richmond Dispatch, July 26, August 2, 1891]. Some Reminiscences of the famous Virginia Commander——Curious Mistakes growing out of the absence of his insignia of Rank—Teamsters' blunders Reproved with Vigor—The First burial of his remains. Having seen an account of the removal of the remains of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill from Hollywood cemetery to the site of the monument erected to his memory at the intersection of Laburnam avenue and the Hermitage road, about two miles north of Richmond, my mind was naturally drawn to the career of that gallant officer in the war for Southern independence. It was my fortune to be a member of his military family during the First Maryland campaign, which, as is well known, included the capture of Harper's Ferry with about ten thousand Federal troops, together with immense supplies and arms, and closed with the terrific engagement at Sharpsburg, as we called it, or Antietam, as the Federals have i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First burial of General Hill's remains. (search)
First burial of General Hill's remains. The following communication was elicited by the account in the Dispatch of July 2, 1891, of the removal the preceding day of the remains of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill from Hollywood to the receptacle that had been prepared for them in the foundation of the Hill monument on the Hermitage road. Mention is there made of the first interment of the General's body, which is very far from being correct. The temporary burial of the body in Chesterfield, where it remained several years, was an act of necessity and not of choice or pre-arrangement. As the only surviving relative who participated in the sad rites of burial of our distinguished dead, I feel that it is my privilege as well as duty to make the correction and explain why his grave has remained so long unmarked by tombstone or shaft, and why he was not buried in his native county (Culpeper). General Hill was killed near Petersburg April 2, 1865, and the next day (that memorable Sunda
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
Colonel Morton Marye, Hon. R. H. Cardwell, Mr. John V. L. Klapp and others. An animated picture. While the disposition of the various organizations was being made, the picture from the statue was a most animated and inspiring one. There was a clear sweep for the vision in whichever direction one turned. All over the field to the southeast were groups of cavalry, and paralleling the road in the same direction was a long line of glistening musket-barrels. To the immediate rear, the Hermitage road was bordered by vehicles and citizens. To the immediate rear of these, and made all the more prominent by a background composed of another immense throng in citizen's dress, were the Confederate camps and Sons of Veterans, in their gray uniforms and vari-colored badges. To the left and west the red artillery were stationed; here, there, and everywhere staff officers were galloping over the fields, and on every side fluttered State colors and Confederate battle-flags. Some of these
The Hermitage Camp of Instruction.--From the very large number of young, strong and likely men which are daily to be seen upon the streets, we are sure our citizens had already concluded that Virginia was preparing to accept the "irrepressible conflict" with at "irrepressible" spirit. But we judge there are few who have not seen for themselves whose estimate of the preparation which is making approximates the reality. To such as suppose that Virginia is not making preparations commensurate with the immensity of her requirements, we would extend an earnest invitation to visit the several encampments in the vicinity of this city, and see for themselves. Besides the encampments of volunteers in this vicinity, there are a number of companies quartered in buildings in various sections of the city proper, and daily the number increases. We shall only speak particularly now of the encampment at the Hermitage Fair Grounds where about 5,000 troops are undergoing the preparation nece
Tennessee. The Nashville Gazette, of Friday last, says: Our sister Southern cities may be anxious to know what Nashville, the capital of the Volunteer State, is doing in the cause. Up to this time, the companies organized are as follows: The Rock City Guard Battalion, composed of three companies; Tennessee Rifles, Cheatham Rifles, Jackson Irish Volunteers, Old Hickory Guards, Hermitage Light Infantry, Beauregard Light Infantry, Harris Guards, N. & C. Depot Boys, Nashville Greys, Nashville Guards, Tennessee Hangers, (cavalry,) Nashville Shelby Dragoons, (cavalry,) Breckinridge Rangers, Bell Greys, 8th Ward Home Guards, North Nashville Home Guards, Tennessee Artillery and Nashville Artillery — in all twenty-one, and footing up 2,500 men. In addition to those organized in the city, we learn that there is not a civil district in the county where one or more companies have not been formed. Davidson county alone can march into service to-day 4,000 good soldiers, with a suf
ell, 2 blankets and socks; 2 prs socks for 30th Va reg't; Mrs. E B Halle, Essex, 12 prs socks; Mrs. Brockenbrough, 5 prs socks; Mrs. E A Contee 4 prs socks; Mrs. Gwathney, 4 prs do; Ladies' S A Society, Westmoreland, 10 prs socks; A S C, Halifax, 4 prs socks and 12 carpet blankets; 26 prs socks from--;from--, lint and rage; Henry Clay S A Society, Hanover, 28 prs socks; Mrs. Shultice, Goochland, 3 prs socks; Mrs. Dyer, 2 prs do; Mrs. S Tunstall, 3 prs do; G W Wilson, $100; R S Jones, Hermitage, 20; Dr R Southgate, P A C S, 100; Dr S A Hart, 20 Mrs. John G Williams, 5; Young Ladies of Black Walnut, Halifax, 316; Misses Yancey, Boydton, 45.5; from--,for soldiers? families, 10; from citizens of Goochland, per Jas W Logan, for Capt Lacy's company, 255; Mrs. E B Halle, Essex, 100; Va Haric do, 100; La dies' S A Society, Hardy, for socks for Hardy Blues, 65; for poor of the city through office of Central Presbyterian, 200; W R Jones &Co, 100; Thomas Jones, 100; Mrs. Chas S Carringto
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