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ssouri, to August, 1863. Reserve Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Arkansas Expedition, to October, 1863. Service. Engaged in operations against guerillas about Booneville, Glasgow, Fulton and in North Missouri at Lebanon, and in Southwest Missouri covering frontier from Iron Mountain to Boston Mountains till June, 1863. Companies L and M joined November, 1862. Actions at Florida, Mo., May 22, 1862. Salt River, near Florida, May 31. Boles' Farm, Florida, July 22 and 24. Santa Fe July 24-25. Brown Springs July 27. Moore's Mills, near Fulton, July 28. Kirksville August 26. Occupation of Newtonia December 4. Hartsville, Wood's Fork, January 11, 1863. Operations against Marmaduke April 17-May 2. Cape Girardeau April 26. Near Whitewater Bridge April 27. Castor River, near Bloomfield, April 29. Bloomfield April 30. Chalk Bluffs, St. Francis River, April 30-May 1. Davidson's march to Clarendon, Ark., August 1-8. Steele's Expedition t
ect to the Mexican War; charging him with want of sympathy with those who seek to carry into our institutions that practical conscience which declares it to be equally wrong in individuals and in states to sanction slavery. Through you, continues Mr. Sumner, they [the Bostonians] have been made to declare an unjust and cowardly war with falsehood in the cause of slavery. Through you they have been made partakers in the blockade of Vera Cruz, in the seizure of California, in the capture of Santa Fe, in the bloodshed of Monterey. It were idle to suppose that the poor soldier or officer only, is stained by this guilt. It reaches far back, and incarnadines the halls of Congress; nay, more,--through you it reddens the hands of your constituents in Boston; and he concludes the letter by the assertion that more than one of his neighbors will be obliged to say,--Cassio, I love thee, But never more be officer of mine. In this forcible letter, the writer uses these memorable words indica
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: H. Clay Pate. (search)
an had six grown sons; and also searched houses, men, and Free State settlers, and acted in a violent and lawless manner generally. Not being able to find Captain Brown, senior, at Ossawatomie, Pate's company and the troops started back for the Santa Fe road. In the long march that intervened, under a hot sun, the two Browns, now in charge of the Dragoons, and held without even the pretence of bogus law, were driven before the Dragoons, chained like beasts. For twenty-five miles they thus sufps it was a lurking dread of Captain Brown's rescuing the prisoners, that made Captain Pate deliver theta to the United States Dragoons. The Dragoons, with their prisoners, encamped on Middle Ottawa Creek, while Pate went on with his men to the Santa Fe road, near Hickory Point. On the evening of Saturday, the 31st of May, he encamped on the head of a small branch or ravine, called Black Jack, from the kind of timber growing there. As soon as Captain Pate had reached the ground that was de
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
27, 1; 29, 1; 42, 1; 69, 1 Sandy Ridge, N. C. 117, 1; 138, B1; 142, B14 Sandy River, W. Va. 135-A; 141, 6 Sangster's Station, Va. 7, 1 San Luis Obispo, Cal. 120, 1; 171 Santa Catalina Island, Cal. 134, 1; 171 Santa Fe, Mo. 152, B6 Santa Fe, N. Mex. 54, 1; 98, 1; 119, 1; 120, 1; 171 Santa Rosa Island, Fla. 135-A; 147, F6 Santee River, S. C. 76, 2; 117, 1; 135-A; 139, D2; 143, E13; 144, A12; 171 Sappony Church, Va. 93, 1; 137, G7 SaSanta Fe, N. Mex. 54, 1; 98, 1; 119, 1; 120, 1; 171 Santa Rosa Island, Fla. 135-A; 147, F6 Santee River, S. C. 76, 2; 117, 1; 135-A; 139, D2; 143, E13; 144, A12; 171 Sappony Church, Va. 93, 1; 137, G7 Sara Bayou, La. 155, H6; 156, A6, 156, B6; 171 Satartia, Miss. 155, B9; 171 Sauk Center, Minn. 33, 2 Saulsbury, Tenn. 117, 1; 135-A; 154, B12 Saunders' Ford, Ala.: Sketch, April, 1865 72, 5 Savage Station, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 74, 1; 92, 1; 100, 1, 100, 2; 137, E8 Savannah, Ga. 69, 4, 69, 5; 70, 1, 20, 2, 70, 3; 71, 10, 71, 11; 76, 2; 79, 3; 80, 1; 86, 1; 90, 8; 91, 4; 101, 21; 117, 1; 118, 1; 120, 2; 133, 3; 135-A; 144, F10; 145, A12; 171
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] (search)
len, James, March 18, 1862, died since the war. Bosserman, A., March 18, 1862, died in spring of 1862. Bashaw, William, March 18, 1862, died in spring of 1862. Black, Joseph M., March 18, 1862, killed on Chesapeake and Ohio railway since the war. Black, David A., March 18, 1862, living at Smithton, Mo. Black, Frank, March 18, 1862, died in hospital, September, 1862. Clemmer, Henry C., March 18, 1862, living at Moffett's Creek. Hanger, Jacob, March 18, 1862, living at Santa Fe, Mo. Lotts, George, March 18, 1862, died prisoner at Fort Delaware. Lotts, John, March 18, 1862, living at Spotswood. Zimmerman, D. B., March 18, 1862, died since the war. Beard, James T., March 21, 1862, living at Clinton, Mo. Beard, Thomas, March 21, 1862, died since the war. Beard, David W., March 21, 1862, living at Alone Mills, Va. Brown, Stuart S., March 21, 1862, died prisoner at Fort Delaware, February, 1865. Brubeck, David F., March 21, 1862, died prisoner at
News from New Mexico. Independence, May 26. --The New Mexico mail arrived here last night, twelve days out from Santa Fe with dates to the 13th. Many United States officers in New Mexico have resigned. Capt. Roberts, one of the contractors of the mail line from Carson city, brought in with him $7,000 in gold dust for parties in the East and also ninety letters. This line is now in complete running order from Independence to Carson city and California Gulch. Some Indians weres officers in New Mexico have resigned. Capt. Roberts, one of the contractors of the mail line from Carson city, brought in with him $7,000 in gold dust for parties in the East and also ninety letters. This line is now in complete running order from Independence to Carson city and California Gulch. Some Indians were seen on the route, but they were peaceable and quiet. Grass is in abundance. It was reported at Santa Fe that Col. Loring, commanding at New Mexico, had resigned.
News from Texas. Independence, Mo., Aug. 7 --The Santa Fe mail has arrived. There is considerable excitement in New Mexico and Texas, and the security of public property is threatened — About one thousand troops, who were returning to the States, had been recalled. Two Federal officers had deserted and joined the Texans. The Texan forces at Fort Bliss were 700, with pickets within ten miles of Fort Fillmore, which was defended by thirteen companies of regulars.
against it. The Surrender of Federal troops. The following is a fuller account of a circumstance already noticed: Independence, Mo., Aug. 19. --The Santa Fe mail and Cannon City Express arrived last evening with dates from Santa Fe to the 5th, and from Cannon City to the 9th inst. A report had reached Santa Fe tSanta Fe to the 5th, and from Cannon City to the 9th inst. A report had reached Santa Fe two days before the mail left that Major Lynch, of the 7th Infantry U. S. Army, in command of about 500 Federal troops, surrendered to a force of Texan troops, some 3,000 strong, without firing a shot. Major Lynch abandoned Fort Fillmore on the 26th ult., and marched toward Fort Staunton, eighteen miles from Fort Fillmore. HeSanta Fe two days before the mail left that Major Lynch, of the 7th Infantry U. S. Army, in command of about 500 Federal troops, surrendered to a force of Texan troops, some 3,000 strong, without firing a shot. Major Lynch abandoned Fort Fillmore on the 26th ult., and marched toward Fort Staunton, eighteen miles from Fort Fillmore. He surrendered his whole command to the Texan troops. It is believed in Santa Fe that the Texans have also taken the stock and coaches belonging to the Santa Fe and El Paso Mail Company, as their coach had failed to arrive in Santa Fe. On the 3d instant an engagement took place at Mesilla, between a body of Federal troops and
to a relative in Houston. It was written from Las Cruces, under date of November 2d. "I have nothing new this time to write about, only that we are hourly expecting the Abs. from New Mexico 2,600 strong. Everything like stores, &c., have been removed to Fort Quitman, below Bliss; and we intend fighting them here, relying on a just Providence to equal our numbers. Our force, all told, is but 600, but good and true men. Expresses have been sent to Sibley to hurry up. I expect to be in Santa Fe, the capital of New Mexico, Christmas day. Some twenty Californians have just arrived here from California. They bring dates of September 12th, and we learn with pleasure that Sumner is not coming here with troops, that he can't raise them." Missouri refugees in Texas. The Southwest, published in Texas, has the following item: Scarcely a day passes that we do not see from one to a dozen wagons in our town, accompanied by men, women, and children — white and black — fleeing
quantity of such seed as he believes will succeed in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois for distribution in small quantities. One hundred and twenty-five condemned Government horses were sold at auction to day, bringing from one dollar to ninety-eight dollars, or an average of twenty-eight dollars each. Is is said that some of these animals have contagious diseases. News from New Mexico--rebel troops marching to attack Fort Craig and Fort Union. Kansas City, Mo, Jan. 13. --The Santa Fe mail has arrived, with dates to December 29. Two thousand Texan troops are reported to be marching up the Rio Grand river for the purpose of attacking Fort Craig, and the same number marching up the Tocos river to attack Fort Union. The troops stationed at Fort Wise have been ordered to New Mexico. Fort Union is well prepared to receive an at tack; but fears are entertained that Fort Craig will be taken and the Texans advance on Santa Fe. Considerable excitement prevails in that place.
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