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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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out Saturday evening, going by the road to Sharpsburgh, and capturing on its way, Longstreet's traon the left of the road from Rohersville to Sharpsburgh. In the afternoon of the sixteenth the wumner's corps, camp on battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 21, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel Tayloart taken by this regiment in the battle of Sharpsburgh on the seventeenth instant: On the after bivouac it had occupied on the left of the Sharpsburgh road, and proceeded in a south-westerly dir Report of General McClellan. near Sharpsburgh, September 29--1.30 P. M. Major-General Halin the bloody battles of South-Mountain and Sharpsburgh. No troops in Europe could have done betteing then by a road which enters the pike at Sharpsburgh, turning at once the rebel flank and destrosand. Savannah Republican account. Sharpsburgh, September 17, 9 P. M. A bloody battle hroughout the entire day. During this battle Sharpsburgh was fired by the enemy's shells, and at one[13 more...]
derick. It is stated that Lee gives his loss as fifteen thousand. We are following as rapidly as the men can move. George B. McClellan, Major-General. General Doubleday's report. headquarters First division, First army corps, near Sharpsburgh, Va., Sept. 28, 1862. Major: I have the honor to report that this division left the Monocacy at six A. M., September fourteenth, and arrived at the Catoctin about half-past 12 P. M. Here the column halted until half-past 2 P. M., when Brig.-Getained, but it is known they very greatly exceeded our own. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. D. Cox, Brig.-General, Commanding Kanawha Division. Report of Colonel Meredith. Gibbon's brigade headquarters, camp near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 20, 1862. Hon. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana: dear sir: I most respectfully submit to you the following report of the part taken by the Nineteenth Indiana volunteers in the battle of the fourteenth instant, at South-Mountai
Maryland Home Brigade,800 Third Maryland Home Brigade,500 Fifth New-York Artillery,267 Graham Battery,110 Fifteenth Indiana128 Phillips's New-York Battery,120 Potts's Battery,100 Rigby's Battery,100 Officers connected with Headquarters and Commissary Department,50 Scattering cavalry,50 Sick and wounded in hospitals,312   Total,11,583 All of the cavalry, numbering about two thousand, under the command of Col. Davis, cut their way out Saturday evening, going by the road to Sharpsburgh, and capturing on its way, Longstreet's train, and more than a hundred prisoners. They comprised the following: Eighth New-York, Twelfth Illinois, Rhode Island and Maryland. They left at nine o'clock, crossing to Maryland on the pontoon-bridge. Rebel pickets fired on them as they passed by. The artillery taken comprised the following: Twelve 3-inch rifled guns. Six James's. Six 24-pound howitzers. Four 20-pound Parrott guns. Six 12-pound guns. Four 12-pound howitzer
on the left of the road from Rohersville to Sharpsburgh. In the afternoon of the sixteenth the worted by Col. Crook--was ordered to move on Sharpsburgh, which lay about a mile distant to the righumner's corps, camp on battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 21, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel Taylof the Potomac, on the field of battle, near Sharpsburgh, September 18, 1862. General: On the mordquarters Ninth New-York volunteers, near Sharpsburgh, Md., Sept. 20, 1862. Colonel: I beg to rep Report of General McClellan. near Sharpsburgh, September 29--1.30 P. M. Major-General Halin the bloody battles of South-Mountain and Sharpsburgh. No troops in Europe could have done bettef glory. The names of South-Mountain and Sharpsburgh will be inscribed on the respective regimening then by a road which enters the pike at Sharpsburgh, turning at once the rebel flank and destrohe succeeded in establishing himself on the Sharpsburgh road in the rebel rear. Yet Hooker and Sum[7 more...]
f whatever similar movements may have been attempted by us. Our loss is variously estimated at from five to nine thousand. Savannah Republican account. Sharpsburgh, September 17, 9 P. M. A bloody battle has been fought to day. It commenced at daylight and lasted until eight o'clock at night--fourteen hours. The enemy mao return to Virginia. P. W. A. Richmond Inquirer account. Richmond, September 23. We have received authentic particulars of the sanguinary battle at Sharpsburgh alluded to elsewhere, and concerning which so many painful rumors were afloat on yesterday. We have the gratification of being able to announce that the battle Jackson, and gradually became general. Both armies maintained their respective positions, and fought desperately throughout the entire day. During this battle Sharpsburgh was fired by the enemy's shells, and at one time the enemy obtained a position which enabled them to pour a flanking fire upon a portion of our left wing, causi
An act of Villainy.--A correspondent of the Boston Traveller, writing from Sharpsburgh an account of General Kilpatrick's charge on the rebel rear-guard, near Downsville, relates the occurrence of a dastardly act as follows: General Kilpatrick got within half a mile of the enemy's rear-guard, near Downsville, Md., when our spies discovered that lines of rifle-pits were ready to contest their advance. These works were erected on the brow of quite a large hill, and General Kilpatrick at once resolved to feel the strength of his foe. Two companies of the Sixth Michigan cavalry, B and F, were ordered to charge up the hill to the earthworks, which was done in fine style. As our men dashed in sight, the rebels were seen to throw down their arms and hoist a flag of truce. Supposing, of course, the enemy had surrendered, they continued on, and when within fifty or sixty feet the entire rebel force, which must have numbered from seven hundred to one thousand men, seized their rifle
e road from Boonsboro to Rohrersville, were to reenforce Franklin or move on Sharpsburgh, according to circumstances. Franklin moved toward Brownsville, and found tsition of the enemy, I directed all the corps, except that of Franklin, upon Sharpsburgh, leaving Franklin to observe and check the enemy in his front, and avail himtietam Creek, their left and centre being upon and in front of the road from Sharpsburgh to Hagerstown, and protected by woods and irregularities of the ground. Theut three fourths of a mile. Their right rested on the hills to the right of Sharpsburgh, near Snavely's farm, covering the crossing of the Antietam, and the approacced, and with success, driving the enemy before it, and pushing on nearly to Sharpsburgh, while the left, after a hard encounter, also compelled the enemy to retire the latter part of the day from the Virginia shore to their position behind Sharpsburgh, as seen by our officers, suddenly formed the design of abandoning their lin
s day. The cavalry reenforcement were many hours too late to be of any service. The whole rebel force had succeeded in effecting their escape into Virginia at this crossing about noon of Sunday. Riding back to-day from White's Ferry to headquarters in company with General Pleasanton, I learned from that officer the chief points in his remarkable chase after the rebel cavalry. When he received his orders on Saturday morning from headquarters to proceed in pursuit he was stationed near Sharpsburgh. At seven A. M., he had started, his command consisting of portions of the Eighth Illinois cavalry, Third Indiana cavalry, and Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, with Lieut. Pennington's battery of horse artillery. At eleven A. M. of Saturday they made Hagerstown. Thence they moved out on Clearspring road three miles toward Hancock, but were recalled to Hagerstown by a despatch from headquarters. From Hagerstown they were ordered to Mechanicstown, which they made at eight P. M. of Saturday.
is unnecessary for me to discuss the disgraceful surrender of the post and army under Col. Miles's command. General McClellan's preliminary report of his operations in Maryland, including the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam, is submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 4. No reports of his subordinate officers have been submitted. From the seventeenth of September till the twenty-sixth of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburgh and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe, and during the most favorable season for rapid movements and a vigorous campaign, was a matter of great disappointment and regret. Your letter of the twenty-seventh, and my reply on the twenty-eighth of October, in regard to the alleged causes of this unfortunate delay, I submit herewith, marked Exhibit No. 5. In reply to the telegraphic order of the sixth of October, quoted in my letter of the t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore), Trophies of the field of Antietam. (search)
Trophies of the field of Antietam. Messrs. Editors: During a visit to the headquarters of the army of the Potomac at Sharpsburgh, a few days after the great battle of Antietam, in company with several gentlemen from Philadelphia, I was favored with a personal interview with Gen. McClellan, during which our attention, while in his tent, was drawn to a large number of colors taken from the rebels in the battles of South-Mountain, Antietam, and Shepherdstown Bluffs. As they possessed great interest to our party, Gen. McClellan very kindly gave us a great deal of information in regard to them, and by his permission I made the list and descriptions of them herewith appended. As will be seen by a reference to the General's official report of the battles, this list comprises less than .one half of the colors captured, the whole number being thirty-nine. The list embraces all, however, which at the time of our visit had been received at the headquarters, and though only partial, may,
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