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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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ld send promptly the troops carried to Hardeeville by Brigadier-General Taliaferro to rejoin their respective brigades, and the detached companies or battalions of South Carolina reserves and militia to report to Brigadier-General Chestnut, at Grahamville; and the companies of the 3d South Carolina Cavalry, under Colonel Colcock, to unite with those now in front of Grahamville and near Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo and Kirk's squadron, together with the section of horse artillery attached to thGrahamville and near Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo and Kirk's squadron, together with the section of horse artillery attached to the 3d South Carolina Cavalry. Endeavor to bring and keep together, as far as practicable, the troops of the same organization. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. R. Chisolm, A. D. C. While the foregoing communication was being penned this telegram was forwarded to Richmond: Pocotaligo, S. C., Dec. 20th, 1864. President Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va.: General Hardee reports that about fifteen hundred of the enemy's infantry crossed yesterday Savannah River, from Arg
a as quite as bad as Charleston. Supplemental Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, vol. i., p. 291. Thus, General Sherman agreed with General Halleck in the barbarous programme, and promised its thorough execution. This furnishes unequivocal proof of malice aforethought and premeditated incendiarism. The fate of the towns, villages, and hamlets lying in the track of General Sherman's army in South Carolina shows the sincerity of his expressions. Hardeeville, Grahamville, McPhersonville, Barnwell, Blackville, Midway, Orangeburg, and Lexington, situated between the border of Georgia and the City of Columbia, were given to the flames, and a like doom was reserved for the capital of the State. The torch was mercilessly applied to buildings, public and private, for hundreds of miles on the route of the invading army. Gross indignities were perpetrated on the persons of inoffensive inhabitants. Agricultural implements were wantonly destroyed; dwellings, mil
red General Pemberton ordered one battalion of sharp-shooters to Grahamville, and one to this post. He informed me that this was the only recut the railroad, in my opinion it will be at some point between Grahamville and the bridge over the Combahee River. It is the line most accPickens. Savannah, Ga., Oct. 22d, 1862. Col. C. T. Colcock, Grahamville, S. C.: Make a reconnoissance with disposable force towards Bee'sf Staff. Savannah, Ga., Oct. 22d, 1862. Col. C. T. Colcock, Grahamville, S. C.: Troops are being sent to-night to support Colonel Harrisof infantry and artillery from Savannah should be sent at once to Grahamville; those from Charleston to Pocotaligo. Both points are threatenee dawn; troops moving rapidly. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Grahamville, Oct. 22d, 1862. Genl. Beauregard: I have just heard from Cooember 12th, 1864. Brigadier-General James Chestnut's Command, Grahamville. Command.Commanding Officer.Effec've Total.Positions. 2d Reg
s the fog lifted. From the landing a tortuous wagon-road led to Grahamville,—a village some eight or ten miles distant, near the Charleston when they should have turned to the right at the church to reach Grahamville. It is said that the guide employed was either ignorant or fait without fires, the pickets disturbed by occasional shots on the Grahamville road during the night. Our failure to seize the railroad on toops from Savannah, but ordered two regiments from Charleston to Grahamville. But fortune favored the enemy by the opportune arrival at Savaharleston and Savannah Railroad; the leading brigade arriving at Grahamville about 8 A. M., on the 30th. With Smith's and the local force it, the district commander, who was temporarily absent, arrived at Grahamville at 7 A. M. It was arranged that General Smith should advance abory beyond Bolan's church reported the enemy advancing down. the Grahamville road. General Hatch moved his column at 7.30 A. M., preceded by
, 114, 121, 127, 128, 129, 133, 134, 138, 141, 146, 148, 149, 150, 153, 155, 156, 157, 178, 185, 189, 274, 289, 290, 314, 315. Gilmore's Band, 31, 318. Gilmer, J. F., 150. Glasgow, Abraham, 168. Glassell, William T., 132. Golden Gate, steamer, 215, 237, 239. Gooding, J. H., 168, 173, 183. Goodwin, Frank, 201. Gordon, George H., 5, 109. Gospels, Copies of, 134, Gould plantation, 39, 44. Grace, James W., 9, 10, 34, 84, 105,144, 317. Graham's Neck, S. C., 262, 263, 264. Grahamville, S. C., 238, 239, 240. Grant, U. S., 140, 185, 288. Gray, W. H. W., 129. Greek fire, 145. Green, A. M., 12. Green, Fort, 134, 191, 192, 219, 234. Green, John, 304. Green Pond, S. C., 275. Green, Samuel A., 64. Gregg, Fort, 70, 111, 119, 121, 123, 128,, 134, 138, 139, 143, 194, 232, 314. Gregg, William, 312. Gregory's Landing, S. C., 262, 263, 264.. Gregory's Plantation, 258. Grimball, Thomas, 53, 56. Grimball's Causeway, 201. Grimes, William, 10, 23, 25, 318. Grover, Cuvie
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ile stationed the troops at his command at points covering the landings. General Drayton, with a part of Martin's regiment of cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Colcock, and Heyward's and De Saussure's regiments, was watching Bluffton and the roads to Hendersonville. Clingman's and Radcliffe's North Carolina regiments, with artillery under Col. A. J. Gonzales, Captain Trezevant's company of cavalry, and the Charleston Light Dragoons and the Rutledge Riflemen, were stationed in front of Grahamville, to watch the landings from the Broad. Colonel Edwards' regiment and Moore's light battery were at Coosawhatchie, Colonel Dunovant's at Pocotaligo, and Colonel Jones', with Tripp's company of cavalry, in front of the important landing at Port Royal ferry. Colonel Martin, with part of his regiment of cavalry, was in observation at the landings on Combahee, Ashepoo and Edisto rivers. The idea of this disposition, made by Ripley immediately upon the fall of Forts Walker and Beauregard, was
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
eral Beauregard's line of defense. But his expedition signally failed, and he was defeated with brilliant success by Colonel Walker's troops at Old Pocotaligo and at Coosawhatchie bridge. Learning of his landing at Mackay's point and of his advance, Colonel Walker ordered by wire the artillery and infantry named above to repair to the bridge, and himself marched down the Mackay's point road, with all the force he could command, to meet General Brannan. Meanwhile, Col. C. J. Colcock, at Grahamville, commanding the Third South Carolina cavalry, dispatched Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson with five companies of his regiment, and Major Abney, with two companies of his battalion of sharpshooters, to march rapidly to Coosawhatchie and intercept the force which he had learned was moving up the river. These dispositions were effective, as the result showed. Walker's force consisted of Nelson's Virginia battery, two sections of Elliott's battery, and the following commands: Maj. J. H. Morgan'
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
Carolina cavalry, Kirk's squadron, some Georgia and South Carolina reserves and South Carolina militia. They were posted to protect the railroad from Pocotaligo to the Savannah river and up that river to Sister's ferry, the forces at and near Grahamville under the command of Brigadier-General Chestnut, and those at and near Coosawhatchie under Brigadier-General Gartrell. The latter met the advance under General Potter, on the 6th, sending forward a small battalion of the Fifth Georgia, which N. C., and a tremendous fleet of warships, assisted by a land force, was about to reduce Fort Fisher, the main defense of Wilmington. On January 2, 1865, a Federal brigade made the first crossing of the river near Savannah and moved toward Grahamville. On the 14th, General McLaws, confronting the advance of Howard, from Beaufort, reported: I am endeavoring to evacuate my position. Enemy are immediately in my front. . . . They are now checked at Old Pocotaligo. McLaws withdrew behind the
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
attle of Bentonville. After the close of hostilities this gallant Confederate officer returned to the professional studies he had abandoned, and was graduated at the Charleston medical college in 1868. Since then he has had a very successful career at Columbia, where he is honored by his Confederate comrades with the rank of surgeon of Camp Hampton. Major Henry E. Young Major Henry E. Young, of Charleston, former judge-advocate-general of the army of Northern Virginia, was born at Grahamville in 1831, and was reared on John's island and at Charleston, where his father, Rev. Thomas J. Young, became rector of St. Michael parish. He was educated at South Carolina college and at Berlin and Heidelberg, receiving at Berlin the degree of doctor utriusque jures. When the war broke out he was first lieutenant in the German Rifles (Deutsche Jaegar), Capt. Jacob Small, one of the companies of the First regiment of rifles, Col. J. J. Pettigrew commanding. With his company he was on dut
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
ose places unmolested. At Griswoldville the State troops, contrary to Smith's orders, made an attack upon an intrenched Federal division, and were repulsed with a loss of 51 killed and 472 wounded. Yet they remained close to the Federal line until dark. Then they were withdrawn to Macon and sent on the cars by way of Albany and Thomasville to Savannah. Though the troops of General Smith had not enlisted for service outside the State, they marched in the latter part of November to Grahamville, S. C., to defend the railroad to Charleston from the operations of General Foster, who advanced from Broad river. There they fought gallantly November 30th, in the battle of Honey Hill, beating back the repeated Federal attacks. General Smith in his report particularly commended the service of Colonel Willis, commanding First brigade of Georgia militia; Major Cook, commanding the Athens and Augusta battalions of reserves, and Lieutenant-Colonel Edwards, commanding the Forty-seventh Georgia
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