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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
t off his retreat. Hurlbut, who was at Bolivar, was at the same time ordered to make a strong demonstration toward Grand Junction, near which place Van Dorn had at last arrived with about 10,000 effectives. In order to deceive Van Dorn, and to kessissippi Central, leaving the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Grenada, etc., to Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennessee and the adjoininr 2d, while Van Dorn was at Pocahontas, General Hurlbut telegraphed the information, from an intelligent Union man of Grand Junction, that Price, Van Dorn, and Villepigue were at Pocahontas, and the talk was that they would attack Bolivar. Evidence Corinth occupied by the 52d Illinois Volunteers during the winter of 1862-3. from a War-time photograph. occupy Grand Junction to-morrow, with reinforcements rapidly sent on from the new levies. I can take everything on the Mississippi Central
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
hence to Mobile, Alabama. (3) That the Mississippi Central, leaving the Mobile and Ohio at Jackson, Tennessee, runs nearly south, passing by Bolivar and Grand Junction, Tennessee, and Holly Springs, Grenada, etc., to Jackson, Mississippi. All this region of west Tennessee and the adjoining counties of Mississippi, although here aoutposts and reconnoitering. On October 2d, while Van Dorn was at Pocahontas, General Hurlbut telegraphed the information, from an intelligent Union man of Grand Junction, that Price, Van Dorn, and Villepigue were at Pocahontas, and the talk was that they would attack Bolivar. Evidence arriving thick and fast showed that the e. Troops from Bolivar will Quarters at Corinth occupied by the 52d Illinois Volunteers during the winter of 1862-3. from a War-time photograph. occupy Grand Junction to-morrow, with reinforcements rapidly sent on from the new levies. I can take everything on the Mississippi Central road. I ordered Rosecrans back last nig
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
e (where Blunt was), and getting ready to move again into Missouri, Holmes, who was doing all that he could to reinforce him, was ordered by reason of the exigencies of the war on the eastern side of the Mississippi to abandon the Missouri expedition. The disastrous defeat of Van Dorn at Corinth in October, 1862, opened the way to Grant to move overland against Vicksburg, which stronghold and Port Hudson were the only places that the Confederates then held on the Mississippi. Leaving Grand Junction on the 4th of November Grant advanced toward Holly Springs, Van Dorn falling back before him. McClernand was at the same time concentrating at Memphis a large force which was to move by the river and cooperate in the attack upon Vicksburg. Alarmed by these great preparations the Confederate Government, which had sent Pemberton, who had been in command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, to supersede Van Dorn, instructed Holmes, under date of November 11th, to send ten thous
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
eral Grant was placed in supreme command of the Federal forces in north Mississippi. Then followed a succession of movements against Vicksburg, having for their object the turning of that point. They were all uniformly unsuccessful, and were so remote from the city, with one exception, that the garrison of Vicksburg was not involved in the operations which defeated them. I will simply mention them in the order in which they occurred. First was General Grant's advance from Memphis and Grand Junction, via Holly Springs, toward Grenada. This was defeated by the raids of Van Dorn and Forrest upon Grant's communications [December 20th and December 15th to January 3d]. He was forced to retire or starve. Next came General Sherman's attempt to get in rear of Vicksburg by the Chickasaw Bayou road, which ran from the Yazoo River bottom to the Walnut hills, six miles above the city. His column of thirty thousand men was defeated and driven back with dreadful slaughter by General S. D. Lee
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
ucting the Military and Naval Committees to report plans for the organization of an army and navy, and to make provision for the officers in each service who had deserted their flag and were seeking employment from the Confederates at Montgomery. Preparations were now February 15, 1861. made for the reception and inauguration of Davis. He was at his home near Vicksburg when apprised of his election, and he hastened to Montgomery on the circuitous railway route by the way of Jackson, Grand Junction, Chattanooga, and West Point. His journey was a continuous ovation. He made twenty-five speeches on the way, all breathing treason to the Government by whose bounty he had been educated and fed, and whose laws he had frequently sworn to uphold. A committee of the Convention and the public authorities of Montgomery met him eight miles from the city. February 15. At Opelika, two companies from Columbus, Georgia, joined the escort. He reached his destination at ten o'clock at night, wh
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 14: the great Uprising of the people. (search)
. having traveled all night on the railway from Grand Junction, in Tennessee. At Oxford, Canton, Jackson, and other places,. 20. but prudence counseled silence. We went on to Grand Junction the next morning, where we were detained thirty-six ho being so nigh. The landlord of the Percey House at Grand Junction was kind and obliging, and made our involuntary sojournother significant amusement at which we assisted. At Grand Junction, four railway trains, traveling respectively on the Nehave just noticed. On the day after his harangue at Grand Junction, Pillow was in Memphis, where he assumed the character in iniquity, with crushing force. Our detention at Grand Junction was fortunate for us. We intended to travel eastward tturn our faces northward. Had we not been detained at Grand Junction, we should then have been in Virginia, possibly in Wasellow-passenger, repeated his disreputable harangue at Grand Junction, and talked of the poverty, the perfidy, the acquisiti
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
spondency, for upon every breeze of intelligence from the West, for several weeks preceding, were borne to Richmond Grand Junction, Mississippi. tidings of disaster to the Confederate cause. There were desperate reasons why the most vigorous effoy the southern march of the Nationals; and conscriptions and impressments were commenced. Jackson, in Tennessee, and Grand Junction, Grand Junction was a very important point, being at the junction of the Charleston and Memphis Railway and the raGrand Junction was a very important point, being at the junction of the Charleston and Memphis Railway and the railway from New Orleans to Jackson, in Tennessee. It was only about two miles northward of the State of Mississippi. During all the time that the Confederates held that section of the country, Grand Junction was the scene of large gatherings of trooGrand Junction was the scene of large gatherings of troops. See page 348, volume I. on the southern border of that State; Corinth, in Mississippi, and Decatur, in Alabama, all of them along the line of the Charleston and Memphis Railway, that stretches from the Mississippi to the Atlantic seaboard — were
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
eries at Port Hudson, secured the mouth of the Red River, and the navigation of the Mississippi to Vicksburg, and, being at liberty to devote more time to the northern portion of his department, he took position, accordingly, not far south of Grand Junction. to move toward the Tennessee River at the beginning of September; not, however, without the knowledge of the vigilant Grant, who was prepared to meet them. When Bragg moved northward, supposing Rosecrans was crossing the Tennessee in pursity, he moved forward Sept. 29, 1862. in command of the combined forces (he ranked Price), numbering about twenty-two thousand men, and struck the Memphis and Charleston railway at Pocahontas, Oct. 1 1862. about half way between Corinth and Grand Junction. On the night of the 2d the Confederate Army bivouacked at Chewalla, only ten miles from Corinth. It was difficult for Rosecrans to determine whether Van Dorn's destination was Corinth, Bolivar, or Jackson. He was prepared for any emergenc
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
rant transferred his Headquarters from Jackson (Tennessee) to La Grange, a few miles West of Grand Junction, on the Memphis and Charleston railway. He had concentrated his forces for a vigorous movemthe railway at Garner's. Station, just north of Grenada, where the railways from Memphis and Grand Junction meet, and destroyed the road and bridges there. They then went northward to Oakland and Panla, on the Memphis road, and then struck across the country southeast to Coffeeville, on the Grand Junction road. having accomplished the object of their expedition, Hovey and Washburne returned to t Its loss was a paralyzing blow to the expedition, for Grant was. Compelled to fall back to Grand Junction, to save his Army from the most imminent peril, and perhaps from destruction. This left Genhe enterprise became known to Pemberton, and it was abandoned. Rumors of Grant's retreat to Grand Junction had reached Sherman, and he resolved to return to Milliken's Bend on the Mississippi. The t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
Lafayette, East-port, and other gun-boats rendezvoused, and immense power was immediately brought to bear on the cutting of the canal, and other operations of a vigorous siege. General Grant, as we have observed, hastened back to Memphis after the conference at Napoleon, and immediately commenced moving his troops, which had been gathered there after the disaster at Holly Springs, down the Mississippi, to assist in the siege of Vicksburg. These troops had been pushed to Memphis from Grand Junction as rapidly as possible, and were now reorganized and in readiness for other work. All these veterans of the Army of the Tennessee, excepting detachments left to hold posts in that State, and the divisions of Logan, were there, and with ample provisions and other supplies, they were now borne swiftly, on more than a hundred transports, upon the rapid current of the rising Mississippi, and were before Vicksburg at the beginning of February. Grant himself arrived at Young's Point on the 2
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