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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
nsported by rail to Pulaski, Tennessee; and General Thomas ordered General Schofield, with the Twenty-third Corps, to Columbia, Tennessee, a place intermediate between Hood (then on the Tennessee River, opposite Florence) and Forrest, opposite Johnsonville. On the 31st of October General Croxton, of the cavalry, re ported that the enemy had crossed the Tennessee River four miles above Florence, and that he had endeavored to stop him, but without success. Still, I was convinced that Hood's ar. He actually did choose such a place, at the old railroad-piers, four miles above Florence, Alabama, which is below Muscle Shoals and above Colbert Shoals. On the 31st of October Forrest made his appearance on the Tennessee River opposite Johnsonville (whence a new railroad led to Nashville), and with his cavalry and field-pieces actually crippled and captured two gunboats with five of our transports, a feat of arms which, I confess, excited my admiration. There is no doubt that the mont
ry, crossed the Tennessee on the 31st. Forrest had gone down the river to intercept the Federal line of supplies. At Johnsonville Chattanooga. When Hood made his audacious movement upon Sherman's communications, by invading Tennessee--withes to the town. Schofield's army was in a splendid position to invite attack. Rushing a Federal battery out of Johnsonville When Thomas began to draw together his forces to meet Hood at Nashville, he ordered the garrison at Johnsonville, oJohnsonville, on the Tennessee, eighty miles due west of Nashville, to leave that place and hasten north. It was the garrison at this same Johnsonville that, a month earlier, had been frightened into panic and flight when the bold Confederate raider, Forrest, appeJohnsonville that, a month earlier, had been frightened into panic and flight when the bold Confederate raider, Forrest, appeared on the west bank of the river and began a noisy cannonade. New troops had been sent to the post. They appear well coated and equipped. The day after the photograph was taken (November 23d) the encampment in the picture was broken. The fo
ry, crossed the Tennessee on the 31st. Forrest had gone down the river to intercept the Federal line of supplies. At Johnsonville Chattanooga. When Hood made his audacious movement upon Sherman's communications, by invading Tennessee--withes to the town. Schofield's army was in a splendid position to invite attack. Rushing a Federal battery out of Johnsonville When Thomas began to draw together his forces to meet Hood at Nashville, he ordered the garrison at Johnsonville, oJohnsonville, on the Tennessee, eighty miles due west of Nashville, to leave that place and hasten north. It was the garrison at this same Johnsonville that, a month earlier, had been frightened into panic and flight when the bold Confederate raider, Forrest, appeJohnsonville that, a month earlier, had been frightened into panic and flight when the bold Confederate raider, Forrest, appeared on the west bank of the river and began a noisy cannonade. New troops had been sent to the post. They appear well coated and equipped. The day after the photograph was taken (November 23d) the encampment in the picture was broken. The fo
as our line could be formed, we rode forward at The inadequate redoubt at Johnsonville When, most unexpectedly, the Confederate General Nathan B. Forrest appeared on the bank opposite Johnsonville, Tennessee, November 4, 1864, and began firing across the Tennessee River, a distance of about four hundred yards, the fortificable for many miles, and soon the explosions of fixed ammunition, with Johnsonville. When General Forrest swooped down on Johnsonville the landings and banksJohnsonville the landings and banks, several acres in extent, were piled high with freight for Sherman's army. There were several boats and barges yet unloaded for want of room. Forrest captured U. Sraids which imperiled the stores of the Union armies. The evacuation of Johnsonville after Forrest's successful raid The evacuation of Johnsonville after ForreJohnsonville after Forrest's successful raid which a number of wagons were loaded, sounded along the valley road, not unlike the firing of artillery in action. General Rosecrans expressed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
inly to destroy him. And it appears from the report of General Thomas, that Rousseau had four thousand cavalry. At Johnsonville. With all these efforts made to capture him, Forrest again made his escape. As soon as he reached the south side od drove a large number of the enemy into the river, many of whom were killed or drowned. And then striking boldly for Johnsonville, Sherman's chief depot of supplies on the Tennessee river, captured one gunboat, two transports and one barge, heavilywriting to General Grant, November 6th, 1864, about the movements of Hood, says: And that devil Forrest was down about Johnsonville making havoc among the gunboats and transports. Forrest's reputation was now world-wide; and in reading recently a dechange of name a better description of Forrest could scarce be written. Hood's Nashville campaign. The day after Johnsonville was destroyed, Forrest received orders to join General Hood in his march on Nashville. His movements in this campaign
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Raid of Forrest's cavalry on the Tennessee river in 1864. (search)
five miles distant by river from the latter, as the most available from which to obstruct the navigation of the Tennessee river and cut off communication with Johnsonville. These points were admirably suited to entrap any passing boat from above or below. Lieutenant W. O. Hunter's section — Walton's battery — of twenty-poundeoyed. General Forrest arriving upon the ground on the morning of the 31st, energetically pushed the preparations for the contemplated attack on the depot at Johnsonville. General Forrest, sending for me, ordered that I should have the gunboat overhauled, armament repaired, and take charge of the fleet. I readily assented to p and hard bread which had been secured from the Mazeppa, we returned to Paris Landing, all fully satisfied that both boats were seaworthy and in first-class condition for service. We now felt prepared to move upon Johnsonville both by land and water. Happily, no one in the artillery up to this time, had been seriously hurt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
attack would be made by land and water upon Johnsonville. The announcement of Hood's army crossinnessee river. At this time I had not heard Johnsonville whispered, nor do I believe, except for thee lessons of the day before, struck out for Johnsonville. We lay the balance of the day under the gtillery on the river bank a few miles below Johnsonville; at dawn you must attack the gunboats at Jounboat, I shall capture all the gunboats at Johnsonville. It was raining very hard at this time, we meant business. Soon all was uproar in Johnsonville. Long files of infantry could be seen on tthe main points of the final destruction of Johnsonville to both Generals Lee and Breckinridge. Heynoldsburg, which is about four miles from Johnsonville. The cold rain up to the morning of the some half or three-quarters of a mile above Johnsonville. The river bank being higher near the watet of the operations of Forrest's command at Johnsonville was written at the suggestion and request o[16 more...]
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter IX (search)
across to Pulaski, as Stanley was doing. But just then Forrest with his cavalry appeared at Johnsonville, on the Tennessee River west of Nashville, and destroyed a great quantity of property, Generavance of my troops on November 5. He then ordered me to go at once with some of my troops to Johnsonville and dispose of the Confederate cavalry there, and then to return to Nashville and proceed to which would then include the Fourth Corps, my own Twenty-third, except the detachment left at Johnsonville, and the cavalry watching Hood toward Florence. My duty at Johnsonville, where I left two bJohnsonville, where I left two brigades, was soon disposed of; and I then returned to Nashville, and went at once by rail to Pulaski, arriving at that place in the evening of November 13. Some so-called histories of the Tennesseeclearly that I had been with the entire Twenty-third Corps to Nashville, with a part of it to Johnsonville and back to Nashville, and thence to Columbia and near Pulaski, all by rail; that all of the
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XI (search)
which had been received a few minutes before from General Thomas: The enemy's cavalry has crossed in force on the Lewisburg pike, and General Wilson reports the infantry crossing above Huey's Mill, about five miles from this place. I have sent an infantry reconnoissance to learn the facts. If it proves true, I will act according to your instructions received this morning. Please send orders to General Cooper, 1 Cooper commanded the brigade guarding the river below Columbia. via Johnsonville. It may be doubtful whether my messenger from here will reach him. The appendix to General Thomas's report says that I sent this despatch at 8:30 A. M. The appendix to my report says 8:20 A. M. This despatch was evidently in answer to those from General Thomas of 8 P. M. and 10:30 P. M., November 28, as indicated by my orders to Stanley and Ruger, and my despatch of 8:15 A. M. to Wilson. Soon after 10 A. M., November 29, the first report from the brigade sent toward Huey's Mill s
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XV (search)
expectations. He had ordered me to march, as Stanley had done, from Tullahoma to Pulaski; but the action of Forrest at Johnsonville about that time caused General Thomas to change his orders and hurry me by rail to Nashville, and thence to JohnsonvilJohnsonville, with the advance of my troops, he wishing to see me in person as I passed through Nashville. War Records, Vol. XXXIX, part III, p. 624. It would not be an unreasonable presumption that the burden of conversation in that brief interview was in respect to the alarming condition at Johnsonville at that time, rather than in respect to some future defensive operations against Hood, then hardly anticipated. Indeed, the entire correspondence of that period, including that which occurred betwen my mind, and, so far as I can recall, never has been any, that when I met General Thomas at Nashville, on my way to Johnsonville, he expected A. J. Smith to arrive from Missouri very soon, when he intended to concentrate all his available troops a
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