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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 13 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
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ate road and the great railroad which formed Bragg's line of communication with Atlanta,) and carefully fortified them. This obstruction delayed for some hours the advance of our forces, which had already crossed the Raccoon and Lookout Mountains, and gave the enemy time not only to recover their spirits, but to receive a portion of their reenforcements. Hitherto our army had been marching in three great columns — Crittenden, followed by Granger, by way of Chattanooga; Thomas, by way of Trenton; and McCook, with Stanley's cavalry, still further to the southward. The daily increasing numbers and boldness of the enemy compelled a concentration of our forces as rapidly as the nature of the case would admit, and by evening of the tenth inst., the whole army was in line along the West-Chickamauga, between the Lookout and Pigeon Mountains, and just to the east of that low chain of wooded hills called Mission Ridge. On Thursday, the seventeenth, the army shifted toward the north, con
Shellmound, and he following close on General Wood, succeeded in crossing his command by four A. M. on Monday. General Van Cleve, with his two brigades, arrived at Jasper, and went into camp to await the crossing. Received from the General Commanding orders for my movements and position after crossing the river, namely: To move up the valley of Running Water Creek and Whiteside, where I was to post one regiment and send one division along the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad to the Trenton road, and to push forward as near to Chattanooga as practicable, and threaten the enemy in that direction. The remainder of the command to occupy a position near the junction of the Murphy Valley road, the road marked on the map as good wagon road to Taylor's. The movement to be completed on the evening of the fourth. September 4.--At twenty minutes past three A. M., received word from General Graft that his brigade was all over. Moved General Van Cleve at once, and at one P. M. moved
ross Sand Mountain, in the direction of Wills's Valley and Trenton. This story, regarded at army headquarters as incredible, was soon after confirmed by reports of the occupation of Trenton by the enemy's cavalry, and its advance up the Wills's Valla covering force to the advance of its infantry columns on Trenton. In order to understand this movement of Rosecrans, andthe latter crosses the valley, has its present terminus at Trenton, and future at Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The distance of Bridgwenty-eight miles, of Caperton's Ferry about forty, and of Trenton something over twenty. Ringgold is eighteen miles from Chs a road leading over Sand Mountain into Wills's Valley at Trenton, and from Trenton to Lafayette and Dalton, over Lookout MoTrenton to Lafayette and Dalton, over Lookout Mountain, through Coopers's and Stevens's Gaps, into McLemore's Cove, and over Pigeon Mountain by Plug Gap. The road from TrenTrenton, following Wills's Valley, exposed, by easy communications, Rome, and, through it, Western Georgia and Eastern Alabama, w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
until within reach of the fortifications and reinforcements had arrived from the south. General Forrest now withdrew and moved with united forces on Humboldt and Trenton, capturing both posts and destroying the stockades and garrison stores. From Trenton, Forrest moved north to Union City, near the Kentucky line, capturing that pTrenton, Forrest moved north to Union City, near the Kentucky line, capturing that point and destroying railway bridges and trestling northward. From Union City the raiders passed along the North-western Railway to McKenzie's Station, at the junction of the North-western and the Memphis and Ohio Railroads. On the 28th Forrest started from McKenzie southward toward Lexington. Meanwhile the Union troops along Forrest's line of march that had escaped capture, strengthened by reinforcements from below Jackson, had resumed their stations at Trenton and Humboldt, and were preparing to cut off Forrest's retreat. On the 31st the main body of the raiders was intercepted at Parker's Cross Roads, on the road to Lexington, by a brigade under Colone
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
sing of the river (Thomas's corps) and had occupied Will's Valley, between Sand and Lookout mountains, without opposition, and had established his headquarters at Trenton. Lookout Mountain now interposed to screen all the enemy's movements from our observation. General Bragg had said petulantly a few days before the crossing ink Negley's division in the cove on September 10th Thomas's corps, after crossing at Bridgeport, Shell Mound, and Caperton's Ferry, arrived, September 4th, near Trenton, in Will's Valley (east of Sand Mountain). On the 6th Negley's division, with Baird's supporting, reached Johnson's Crook, and on the 10th crossed Missionary Ridgs divisions of McCook's corps crossing the Tennessee at Caperton's Ferry passed over Sand Mountain and seized Winston's Gap, while Sheridan's division, moving via Trenton, was close at hand. On the 10th McCook's three divisions were at Alpine. Crittenden's corps by September 4th was across the Tennessee (at Bridgeport, Shell Moun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
erry. Sherman had left Bridgeport the night of the 14th, reached Chattanooga the evening of the 15th, made the above-described inspection the morning of the 16th, and started back the same evening to hurry up his command, fully appreciating the importance of time. His march was conducted with as much expedition as the roads and season would admit of. By the 20th he was himself at Brown's Ferry with head of column, but many of his troops were far behind, and one division, Ewing's, was at Trenton, sent that way to create the impression that Lookout was to be taken from the south. Sherman received his orders at the ferry, and was asked if he could not be ready for the assault the following morning. News had been received that the battle had been commenced at Knoxville. Burnside had been cut off from telegraphic communication. The President, the Secretary of War, and General Halleck were in an agony of suspense. My suspense was also great, but more endurable, because I was where
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
en both and Louisville; and for a fortnight before the battle of Murfreesboro he had been raiding through that region, much of the time with impunity, destroying railway tracks and bridges, attacking small National forces, and threatening and capturing posts. He crossed the Tennessee at Clifton, in the upper part of Wayne County, on the 13th of December, and, moving rapidly toward Jackson, seriously menaced that post. Sweeping northward, destroying tracks and bridges, he captured Humbolt, Trenton, and Union City, and menaced Columbus, the Headquarters of General Sullivan. At Trenton Forrest captured and paroled seven hundred troops, Dec. 20, 1862. under Colonel Jacob Fry, making the number of his paroled prisoners since he crossed the river about one thousand. On his return he was struck at Parker's Cross Roads, between Huntington and Lexington, first by a force of sixteen hundred men, under Colonel C. L. Dunham, and then by General Sullivan, Dec. 31. who came suddenly upon th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
that Thomas and McCook were preparing to cross below, and that the remainder of Crittenden's corps was swarming on the borders of the river, at the foot of Walden's Ridge, below Chattanooga. Thomas passed over with his corps at different places, from Caperton's up to Shellmound, and crossed the mountain not far from the latter place, near which is the famous Nickajack Cave, where the Confederates had extensive saltpeter works. On the 8th of September he had concentrated his forces near Trenton, in the valley of the Lookout Creek, at the western foot of Lookout Mountain, and seized Frick's and Stevens's Gaps, the only practicable passes into the broad valley east of Lookout, and stretching toward Chattanooga, called McLemore's Clove. McCook also crossed, advanced to Valley Head, and took possession of Winston's Gap on the 6th, and a large portion of Crittenden's corps passed over and took post the same day at Wauhatchie, near the Point of Lookout Mountain, where it abuts upon the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
through a gorge of the Raccoon Mountain, General Geary, with his small force, was ordered to encamp at Wauhatchie, the junction of the Memphis and Charleston, and Trenton railways, three miles from Howard's position, with a very thin line of pickets connecting them. From the hour when he entered the valley, Hooker's movements haorce on his left. For this purpose Sherman's troops were put in motion at Bridgeport. Ewing's division moved to Shellmound, and thence over the mountains toward Trenton, some distance up the Lookout Valley, to menace Bragg's left front, while the remainder of Sherman's force, excepting Osterhaus's division, moved up quickly and sbserve presently, crossed the Tennessee to Chattanooga, and at a proper time took position on Thomas's left. Ewing's troops were stealthily withdrawn from near Trenton, and ordered to follow the others of the corps to the extreme left of the Union Army, leaving only Hooker, with the addition of Osterhaus's division, on Bragg's l
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. (search)
May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. Reports. No. 1.-Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. No. 2.-Col. William W. Lowe, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 3.-Capts. William A. Haw and Henning von Minden, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 1.-report of Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that I left Trenton on May 2 and encamped at King's Bridge. On the 3d encamped at McKenzie's Station, waiting Jackson, who joined me on the 4th, and we marched (whole force about 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three columns, to surround it and intercept them toward Fort Heiman. At about 4 p. m. entered Paris. The enemy had moved at 10 a. m. toward Dresden. I immediately detached one column, under Lieuten. ant-Colonel Pell, to Boydsville, and with my own joined Colonel Jacks
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