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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
he severe fight at Brandy Station, and in all the movements conducted by Stuart to mask the movements of Lee's army in the Valley of Virginia as it was being marched for the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. At Aldie, in the county of Loudon, the Black Horse, under command of Lieutenant A. D. Payne, covered itself with glory. The Southern cavalry had been pressing the pursuit from the direction of the Blue Ridge, during the day, and had brought the enemy to a stand at a point on the Middleburg road two miles from Aldie, and at an equal distance from that place on the Snickersville road, these two roads converging at Aldie. Colonel Mumford was in advance with the Fourth Regiment, the Black Horse being the leading squadron. He halted his command, and taking with him two pieces of artillery, he ordered Lieutenant A. D. Payne to follow with his command. He posted the artillery on a prominent point in the angle formed by the two roads, and commenced firing on the enemy who were ad
rough the Piedmont country was delightful; it looked so peaceful and calm that we almost forgot the din of war we had left behind us. The road through Loudoun and Fauquier was picturesque and beautiful. We passed through the villages of Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. At Middleburg we stopped for an hour, and regaled ourselves on strawberries and cream at the house of our excellent brother, the Rev. Mr. K. At Upperville we spent the night. Early next morning we went on through the village Middleburg we stopped for an hour, and regaled ourselves on strawberries and cream at the house of our excellent brother, the Rev. Mr. K. At Upperville we spent the night. Early next morning we went on through the village of Paris, and then began to ascend the Blue Ridge, wound around on the fine turnpike, paused a moment at the top to view the landscape o'er, and then descended into the Valley. The wheat, which is almost ready for the reaper, is rich and luxuriant, foreshadowing an abundant commissariat for our army. After driving some miles over the delightful turnpike, we found ourselves at this door, receiving the warm-hearted welcome of the kindest of relatives and the most pleasant of hosts. Our daughter
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Kershaw. (search)
th, marched to Piedmont; 19th, to Ashby's Gap, where Rice's battalion rejoined the command; 20th, crossed the Shenandoah river at Berry's Ford; 21st, recrossed and took position in line of battle near Paris to resist a threatened attack of the enemy; 22d, returned to camp on western side of the river; 23d, obtained 503 new arms from Winchester; 24th, marched to Summit Point; 25th, to Martinsburg; 26th, crossed Potomac river, camped near Williamsport; 27th, marched by the way of Hagerstown, Middleburg and Greencastle and camped five miles from Chambersburg; 28th, marched through Chambersburg and camped one mile beyond; remained in camp until the 30th, when we marched to Fayetteville; 1st July, Anderson's and Johnson's divisions and General Ewell's wagon train occupied the road until 4 o'clock P. M., when we marched to a point on the Gettysburg road some two miles from that place, going into camp at 12 P. M. The command was ordered to move at 4 A. M. on the morning of the 2d, but did not
heatland and Waterford, taking prisoners at both places, and putting the scattered forces of the rebels to flight. Shortly after sunrise, this morning, he took possession of Fort Johnston at Leesburg, which was christened by the officers Fort Geary. He then entered the town, with flags flying and bayonets fixed. The rebel troops, who had thought this one of their greatest strongholds, could be discerned through a glass retreating. Gen. Hill, the rebel officer in command, fell back on Middleburg. The command took many prisoners and stores, and are in possession of the bank, post-office, and public buildings. Forts Beauregard and Evans were also taken. The battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, was ended after three days severe fighting, between the Unionists under Gen. Curtis, and the rebels led by Ben. McCulloch. On Thursday, the sixth, the rebels commenced the attack on Gen. Curtis's right wing, assailing and pursuing the rear-guard of a detachment under Gen. Franz Sigel, to
March 29. This day, Col. Geary's advance encountered three hundred of Stuart's and White's rebel cavalry, and a force of rebel infantry, at Middleburg, Va. He marched from Philomont in the morning, and drove in the rebel pickets outside of Middleburg, Middleburg is a handsome post-borough, of Loudon County, Va., on a smalMiddleburg, Middleburg is a handsome post-borough, of Loudon County, Va., on a small affluent of the Potomac, one hundred and forty-three miles north from Richmond. It is one of the principal towns of the county, and before the present rebellion had an active trade. It has a population of about eight hundred, and contains three churches, an academy, seven stores, and one tobacco factory. when he entered the tMiddleburg is a handsome post-borough, of Loudon County, Va., on a small affluent of the Potomac, one hundred and forty-three miles north from Richmond. It is one of the principal towns of the county, and before the present rebellion had an active trade. It has a population of about eight hundred, and contains three churches, an academy, seven stores, and one tobacco factory. when he entered the town, and discovered the infantry in retreat, and the cavalry posted to make a stand. A gun was placed to command the main street, and the Twenty-eighth regiment advanced by all the approaches to the town, while the main body rushed through it with bayonets fixed, and on a double-quick, driving the enemy before them. The rebels
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
truly yours, R. E. Lee, General.--J. S. M. Under date of June 22d, 7:30 P. M., he writes to General Lee: I have forwarded your letter to General Stuart, with the suggestion that he pass by the enemy's rear if he thinks he may get through. Up to the morning of June 25th it was perfectly practicable for Stuart to have done so. In accordance with Lee's and Longstreet's instructions Stuart withdrew from the front on the evening of the 24th to pass around Hooker, leaving Robertson about Middleburg with 3000 cavalry and 2 batteries of artillery to observe the enemy. Stuart's success depended upon preserving the status quo of the Federal army until he could get through it. Hooker was on the defensive waiting for his adversary to move. It did not seem to occur to General Longstreet that the march of the infantry down the Shenandoah Valley would disclose all to the enemy that the cavalry would have done. It was no fault of Stuart's that he was foiled by events which he could not contr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
o covering its gaps. Hill left Fredericksburg on the 14th, and reached Shepherdstown via Chester Gap on the 23d. Stuart's cavalry had been thrown out on Longstreet's right to occupy the passes of the Bull Run mountains and watch Hooker's army. On the 17th he encountered, near Aldie, a portion of Pleasonton's command; a fierce fight ensued, which left the Federals in possession of the field. During the four following days there was a succession of cavalry combats; those of the 19th near Middleburg, and of the 21st near Upperville, were especially well contested, and resulted in the retreat of Stuart through Ashby's Gap. Longstreet had already withdrawn through the gaps and followed Hill Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg. From a photograph. The cupola was first used by Union officers, and then by Confederate, as a station for observation and signals. During the withdrawal of the First and Eleventh corps through the town to Cemetery Hill, there was hard fighting in the college
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
cavalry was weak in numbers. Sheridan had sent out two raids since he sent Early whirling up the Valley from Fisher's Hill. One, under General W. Merritt, started from Winchester on the 28th of November, 1864, passed through Ashby's Gap, by Middleburg, to Fairfax Court-House, Centreville, and other points in Loudon Valley, and returned on the 3d of December by way of Grove Creek, Snicker's Gap, and Berryville. Another left Winchester under General A. T. A. Torbert, on the 19th of December, Sperryville and Madison Court-House, to Gordonsville, which they reached on the 23d. Thence, on their return, they went by Culpeper Court-House, to Warrenton. There the column divided, a part going by Salem, and the other by White Plains and Middleburg, to Paris, and thence to Winchester, where they arrived on the 28th. Sheridan left Winchester on the 27th of February, on a damp and cheer-less morning, with about ten thousand men, composed of the First cavalry division, under General W. M
honor at the Petersburg Assault, the Mine Explosion at Deep Bottom, Chaffin's Farm, Fort Gilmer, Darbytown Road, and Fair Oaks. Cavalry Corps. (Army of the Potomac.) Stoneman's Raid Chancellorsville Greenwich Beverly Ford Aldie Middleburg Upperville Hanover Gettysrurg Monterey Fairfield Hagerstown Williamsport Boonsboro falling Waters Shepherdstown Manassas Gap Kelly's Ford Brandy Station Culpeper Raccoon Ford White's Ford Rapidan James City Whith Sulphur Spri proper compliment of horse artillery was attached, and two brigades of infantry were also present in support. Casualties at Beverly's Ford, 484 killed and wounded, not including captured or missing. More hard fighting occurred at Aldie and Middleburg (June 17th and 19th), one of the passes of the mountains which screened Lee's advance into Pennsylvania, the cavalry losing in these two actions 66 killed, 177 wounded, and 161 missing; total, 401. At Gettysburg, the Cavalry Corps was still un
June 17, 1863 8 Malvern Hill, Va., Aug. 16, 1864 4 Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863 11 Charles City Road, Va., Aug. 18, 186h, Va., May 5, 1864 5 Ashland, Va., Mch. 15, 1865 2 Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863 2 Hanover C. H., Va., May 29, 1864 2 Fi12, 1864 3 Prince George C. H., Va., Nov. 2, 1864 1 Middleburg, Va., June 19, 1863 5 Hawes's Shop, Va., May 28, 1864 17 Disputanta Station, Va., Nov. 18, ‘64 3 Middleburg, Va., June 26, 1863 1 Trevilian Station, Va., June 11, 1864 7 Stony Creekost 3 killed, 18 wounded, and 61 captured or missing; at Middleburg, 3 killed, 10 wounded, and 19 missing; at Trevilian StatChancellorsville, Va. 1 Poplar Spring Church, Va. 2 Middleburg, Va. 1 Place unknown 1 Gettysburg, Pa. 36     Pres5 Chancellorsville, Va. 1 Peebles's Farm, Va. 18 Middleburg, Va. 1 Dabney's Mills, Va. 9 Gettysburg, Pa. 29 Gravelly Present, also, at Corinth, Miss.; Bolivar, Miss.; Middleburg, Miss.; Moscow, Tenn.; Resaca, Ga.; Kenesaw, Ga. note
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