hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 225 results in 57 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
ters of the Gauley, among the spurs of the Greenbrier Mountains. His Headquarters,--at the time of Rosecrans's movement from Clarksburg, were at Cheat Mountain Pass (Crouch's), at the western foot of the hills over which goes the highway from Huttonsville to Staunton. There he had the Thirteenth Indiana, Colonel Sullivan, with two pieces of artillery, and a small cavalry force. These were disposed along the approaches to the Pass, to guard against surprise. On the Summit of the Cheat, as we is command of twelve hundred Confederates and about eight hundred Virginians with Colonel Edward Johnston of Georgia, to confront Milroy. He made his Headquarters at Allegheny Summit; and Milroy, when he took chief command, established his at Huttonsville, in Tygart's Valley. Milroy determined to attack Johnston, and for that purpose moved a little over three thousand men on the 12th of December. He directed Colonel Moody of the Ninth Indiana to lead his regiment, with a detachment Robert
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
ited mountain ranges, and at the end of a rough ride of about four hundred miles, going and returning, during eight days, they lost eighty-two men and three hundred horses. A little later, General W. W. Averill started with his cavalry from Huttonsville, in Tygart's Valley, See map on page 101, volume II. and passing through several counties in the mountain region southward, to Pocahontas, drove General W. S. (called Mudwall ) Jackson out of that shire, and over the Warm Springs Mountain, severe struggle for the pass ensued, which lasted a greater portion of the 26th and 27th of August. 1863. Averill's ammunition began to fail at noon of the latter day, when Patten was re-enforced. Averill retreated, and made his way back to Huttonsville, weakly pursued by the Confederate cavalry. Averill's loss was two hundred and seven men, and a Parrott gun, which burst during the fight. The Confederate loss was one hundred and fifty-six men. Much later in the year, Averill, still watc
road runs from Wheeling southeasterly to Staunton, through Philippi, Leedsville, Beverly, and Huttonsville. From Beverly another turnpike runs westerly, at an acute angle with the Wheeling road, to Bn, and Colonel Pegram's about four thousand. Their natural retreat was by way of Beverly and Huttonsville through the Cheat Mountain Pass, as it is called. North of this there is no road over the Alcott. I stated, says he, that it was now certain that the enemy had a force of some kind near Huttonsville, with a strong advanced party intrenched near Laurel Mountain, between Philippi and Beverly, w up the retreat of the enemy in their front. That, after occupying Beverly, I would move on Huttonsville and drive the enemy into the mountains, whither I did not purpose to follow them unless certa surrender at discretion, on the 13th, with about six hundred men. General McClellan occupied Huttonsville and the Cheat Mountain Pass, thus gaining the key to Western Virginia. On the 19th of July h
The Rebels lost sixteen killed and ten prisoners, with all their provisions, munitions, and tents, and nearly all their arms. Porterfield, gathering up such portion of his forces as he could find, retreated hastily to Beverly, and thence to Huttonsville; where the Rebel array was rapidly increased by conscription, and Gov. Wise placed in command. Gen. McClellan arrived at Grafton on the 23d, and at once issued a proclamation severely condemning the guerrilla warfare to which the Rebels werllowers, but of the leaders, who, for personal ambition and personal spite, began this infernal rebellion. Gen. McClellan, with a large portion of his force, had not united in this chase, but had moved southerly from Beverly, several miles, to Huttonsville; whence, on the next day, July 14th. he telegraphed to Washington that Gen. Garnett and his forces have been routed, and his baggage and one gun taken. His army are completely demoralized. Gen. Garnett was killed while attempting to r
tions and feed at Fayetteville; having ridden over 400 miles, lost 83 men, with at least 300 horses, and endured as much misery as could well be crowded into a profitless raid of eight days. Gen. W. W. Averill, setting forth from Huttonsville, Randolph county, moved (down the line dividing West from old Virginia, pushing back the small Rebel forces in that quarter under Col. W. S. [ Mudwall ] Jackson, and menacing an advance on Staunton. At length, when near Lewisburg and White Sulphur Splp from Gen. Scammon, commanding on the Kanawha, which did not reach him. Our total loss here was 207; Patton reports his at 156, and says lie took 117 prisoners. He attempted to pursue with cavalry, but to little purpose. Averill returned to Huttonsville. Late in the Fall, Averill, starting from Beverly with some 5,000 men, and, chasing Col. Mudwall Jackson, struck Nov. 6. a somewhat smaller Rebel force under Gen. Echols, strongly posted on the top of Droop mountain, in Greenbrier count
all the burdens of Government, and to meet all Virginia's liabilities. They come now to aid you as you came in former days to aid them. The men of the Southern Confederate States glory in coming to your rescue. Let one heart, one mind, one energy, one power, nerve every patriot to arm in a common cause. The heart that will not beat in unison with Virginia now is a traitor's heart; the arm that will not strike home in her cause now is palsied by coward fear. The troops are posted at Huttonsville. Come with your own good weapons and meet them as brothers! [L. S.] Given under my hand, and under the seal of the Commonwealth, this 14th day of June, 1861, and in the 35th year of the Commonwealth. By the Governor: John Letcher. Geo. W. Munford, Secretary of the Commonwealth. To the People of Virginia: Whereas the Convention of this Commonwealth, of the 17th of April, 1861, adopted an ordinance to repeal the ratification of the Constitution of the United States of America
Doc. 88.-General McClellan's report. Huttonsville, Va., July 14, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Ass't Adjutant-General: General Garnett and his forces have been routed and his baggage and one gun taken. His army are completely demoralized. General Garnett was killed while attempting to rally his forces at Carrackford, nearon is killed in this section of the country. George B. Mccleltan, Major-General U. S. A. McClellan's operations in Western Virginia. U. S. Camp, near Huttonsville, Randolph Co., Va., Sunday, July 14, 1860. the Army, with Major-Gen. McClellan at its head, reached this place yesterday afternoon. Its achievements for thsal. The rout and demoralization of the rebel army is most utter and complete. Our four columns — Cox's, up the Kanawha, McClellan's, over the mountains at Huttonsville, and Morris's and Hill's, along Cheat River — are all following up the advantage, and moving on. Another narrative. Grafton, Virginia, July 15, 1861.
ee miles of, when we found that a very formidable blockade had been erected, which we could not pass, and, therefore, had to march back on the route we had previously come, to a road that led to the northeast, towards St. George, in Tucker County, which we entered early in the morning. (Here I would state, in the way of parenthesis, that it was the object of General G. to form a connection with Colonels Pegram and Heck, who were stationed at Rich Mountain, and move on Cheat Mountain, via Huttonsville; but the enemy, it seems, cut us off, and got between the two commands, and had our small force almost completely surrounded.) Thus, you will see, our command, composed of four companies of cavalry, Captain Shoemaker's Danville Artillery, Colonel William B. Taliaferro's Twenty-third regiment, Colonel Jackson's regiment, Colonel Fulkerson's Thirty-seventh regiment, and the Georgia regiment, Col. Ramsey, and a small battalion under Colonel Hansborough, all under the immediate charge of Gene
Doc. 4.-affairs at Huntersville, Va. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial gives the following account of the dispersion of the rebels, and the destroying of their stores at Huntersville, Western Virginia, by a detachment of Federal troops, from General Milroy's command: headquarters Twenty-Fifth Ohio regiment, Huttonsville, Va., Jan. 7, 1862. The Huntersville expedition, of which I telegraphed you yesterday, was so successful in its result, and so damaging to the rebel army in these parts, that it merits a more extended notice, and having recovered somewhat from the fatigue of a hundred miles' march, I will try to give some of the chief incidents of the winter march through the mountains, and the extensive conflagration of the famous city of Huntersville, which, after the fashion of Virginia towns, is decidedly an eight-by-ten institution. And first, in order that the reader may know what and where Huntersville is, I will premise by saying that it is the co
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them., Chapter 3: private letters of Gen. McClellan to his wife. [June 21 to July 21, 1861.] (search)
ons, etc. Many prisoners, among whom several officers. Enemy's loss severe, ours very small. No officers lost on our side. I turned the position. All well. July 12, Beverly. Have gained a decided victory at small cost, and move on to Huttonsville to-morrow in hope of seizing the mountain-pass near that point before it is occupied in force by the enemy. If that can be done I can soon clear up the rest of the business to be done out here, and return to see you for a time at least. . . .guns, tents, wagons, etc. Pegram was in command. We lost but 10 killed and 35 wounded. Garnett has abandoned his camp between this and Philippi, and is in full retreat into Eastern Virginia. I hope still to cut him off. All well. July 13, Huttonsville. Since you last heard from me I received from Pegram a proposition to surrender, which I granted. L. Williams went out with an escort of cavalry and received him. He surrendered, with another colonel, some 25 officers, and 560 men. . . . I
1 2 3 4 5 6