Your search returned 181 results in 62 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
the functions of the Federal Government were found to be generally suspended within the several States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida, excepting only those of the Post-Office Department. Within these States all the Forts, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, Custom-Houses, and the like, including the movable and stationary property in and about them, had been seized, and were held in open hostility to this Government, excepting only Forts Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson, on and near the Florida coast, and Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, South Carolina. The forts thus seized, had been put in improved condition, new ones had been built, and armed forces had been organized, and were organizing, all avowedly with the same hostile purpose. The forts remaining in possession of the Federal Government in and near these States were either besieged or menaced by warlike preparations, and especially Fort Sumter was nearly surrounded by well-protected hostile b
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
se I didn't know any thing about it, but I thought you knew your own business best. I thanked him for his confidence, and assured him that what he had done would go far to enable me to maintain good discipline, and it did. By this time the day was well spent. I asked to take my leave, and the President and Mr. Seward drove back to Washington. This spirit of mutiny was common to the whole army, and was not subdued till several regiments or parts of regiments had been ordered to Fort Jefferson, Florida, as punishment. General McDowell had resumed his headquarters at the Arlington House, and was busily engaged in restoring order to his army, sending off the ninety-days men, and replacing them by regiments which had come under the three-years call. We were all trembling lest we should be held personally accountable for the disastrous result of the battle. General McClellan had been summoned from the West to Washington, and changes in the subordinate commands were announced almo
Doc. 13.-the gunboat fight near Columbus, Ky. Commander Porter's report. United States gunboat Essex, Wm. D. Porter, Commanding, Fort Jefferson, Jan. 13, 1861. Flag-Officer A. H. Foote: sir: On the morning of the eleventh, Gen. McClernand sent on board this vessel and informed me that the enemy were moving up the river from Columbus with several vessels, towing up a battery. I immediately signalled Lieut. Commanding Paulding, of the St. Louis, to get under way and prepare for action. A very thick fog coming on, we were compelled to steam slowly down the river; but about ten o'clock, or a little after, it rose, and showed us a large steamer at the head of Lucas' Bend. We heard her whistle the moment we were seen by them. Shortly after whistling she was joined by another large and a small steamer. We pursued our course steadily down the river, and when within long range the large steamer fired a heavy shell-gun, which struck the sand-bar between us, and ricocheted wit
th, marched on the morning of the tenth to Fort Jefferson, Capt. Stewart with his company being in tforces, conveyed by transports, arrived at Fort Jefferson on the same day, tenth,) and encamped awaimiles, and returning by Elliott's Mills to Fort Jefferson, nine miles. This reconnoissance was made d by Putney's Bend and Elliott's Mills, to Fort Jefferson, communicating with and being joined by th explored the different roads leading from Fort Jefferson to Blandville, and selected a strong positeteenth, to communicate with our forces at Fort Jefferson, and to suggest that the pass at Elliott'san adequate force, to prevent my return to Fort Jefferson from being cut off. The courier returned wforces moved forward on the direct road to Fort Jefferson, the Twenty-ninth, with a section of Schwaear of the column and moving on with it to Fort Jefferson. During the exposure of this day's march,es of Dresser's battery, having arrived at Fort Jefferson by one o'clock, were immediately embarked
r permanently holds Pensacola and Florida is entitled to the possession of Fort Pickens. Whoever holds the States in whose limits those forts are placed is entitled to the forts themselves, unless there is something peculiar in the location of some particular fort that makes it important for us to hold it for the general defense of the whole country, its commerce and interests, instead of being useful only for the defense of a particular city or locality. It is true that Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and Tortugas, are so situated as to be essentially national, and therefore important to us without reference to our relations with the seceded States. Not so with Moultrie, Johnson, Castle Pinckney, and Sumter, in Charleston Harbor; not so with Pulaski, on the Savannah River; not so with Morgan and other forts in Alabama; not so with those other forts that were intended to guard the entrance of a particular harbor for local defense. . . . We can not deny that there is a So
army was 16,000 men, and these were principally in the Western States and Territories, guarding the frontier settlers against the Indians. The forts and arsenals on the seaboard, especially within the slave States, were so weakly manned, or not manned at all, that they became an easy prey to the Confederates. The consequence was that they were seized, and when the new administration came into power, of all the fortifications within the slave States only Fort Monroe, in Virginia, and Forts Jefferson, Taylor, and Pickens, on the Gulf coast, remained in possession of the government. The seized forts were sixteen in number. They had cost the government about $6,000,000, and had an aggregate of 1,226 guns. All the arsenals in the cotton-growing States had been seized. Twiggs had surrendered a portion of the National army in Texas. The army had been put so far out of reach, and the forts and arsenals in the North had been so stripped of defenders, by Floyd, Buchanan's Secretary of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clark, or Clarke, George Rogers -1818 (search)
ed country, embracing all the territory north of the Ohio claimed as within their limits, into the country of Illinois, and ordered 500 men to be raised for its defence. Commissioned a colonel, Clark successfully labored for the pacification of the Indian tribes. Learning that Governor Hamilton, of Detroit, had captured Vincennes, Clark led an expedition against him (February, 1779), and recaptured it (Feb. 20). He also intercepted a convoy of goods worth $10,000, and afterwards built Fort Jefferson, on the west side of the Mississippi. The Indians from north of the Ohio, with some British, raided in Kentucky in June, 1780, when Clark led a force against the Shawnees on the Grand Miami, and defeated them with heavy loss at Pickaway. He served in Virginia during its invasion by Arnold and Cornwallis; and in 1782 he led 1,000 mounted riflemen from the mouth of the Licking, and invaded the Scioto Valley, burning five Indian villages and laying waste their plantations. The savages we
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jefferson, Thomas 1743- (search)
ones, by message, to which no answer will be expected. 3. Diplomatic establishments in Europe will be reduced to three ministers. 4. The compensation of collectors depends on you [Congress], and not on me. 5. The army is undergoing a chaste reformation. 6. The navy will be reduced to the legal establishment by the last of this month [May, 1801]. 7. Agencies in every department will be revived. 8. We shall push you to the uttermost in economizing. 9. A very early recommendation Fort Jefferson, Garden Key. has been given to the Postmaster-General to employ no traitor, foreigner, or Revolutionary Tory in any of his offices. Three days after his inauguration he wrote to Monroe: I have firmly refused to follow the counsels of those who have desired the giving of offices to some of the Federalist leaders in order to reconcile them. I have given, and will give, only to Republicans under existing circumstances. The doctrine, To the victor belong the spoils, which has been accepte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jefferson, Fort (search)
Jefferson, Fort A fortification built by Col. George Rogers Clark (q. v.), on the west side of the Mississippi. He had designed to extend his invasion to Detroit, but troops to reinforce him had been added to the force of another bold leader (see Shelby, Evan), and he had to abandon the undertaking. Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, gave instructions for the occupation of a station on the Mississippi River between the mouth of the Ohio and the parallel of 36° 30′; and in the spring of another bold leader (see Shelby, Evan), and he had to abandon the undertaking. Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, gave instructions for the occupation of a station on the Mississippi River between the mouth of the Ohio and the parallel of 36° 30′; and in the spring of 1780 Clarke chose a strong position 5 miles below the mouth of the Ohio, whereon he built Fort Jefferson. Here the Americans planted their first sentinel to watch over the freedom of the navigation of the Father of w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fort Jefferson and Fort Taylor, (search)
Fort Jefferson and Fort Taylor, At the Garden Key, one of the Tortugas Islands, off the extremity of the Florida Peninsula, was Fort Jefferson; and at Key West was Fort Taylor. Neither of these forts was quite finished at the beginning of 1861. The Confederates early contemplated their seizure, but the laborers employed on them by the United Fort Taylor, Key West. States government were chiefly slaves, and their masters wished to reap the fruit of their labor as long as possible. It waFort Jefferson; and at Key West was Fort Taylor. Neither of these forts was quite finished at the beginning of 1861. The Confederates early contemplated their seizure, but the laborers employed on them by the United Fort Taylor, Key West. States government were chiefly slaves, and their masters wished to reap the fruit of their labor as long as possible. It was believed these forts might be seized at anytime by the Floridians. Captain Brannan, with a company of artillery, occupied barracks about half a mile from Fort Taylor. Some of the military and civil officers there were Confederates, and they determined to oppose Captain Brannan if he should attempt to take possession of that fort. Finally Captain Brannan succeeded by a stratagem in gaining possession. The steamer Wyandotte lay near the fort, and her guns commanded the bridge that connecte
1 2 3 4 5 6 7