Your search returned 325 results in 86 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
dopted by the South Carolina Convention, 1.111. Bartlett, Gen., at the battle of Chancellorsville, 3.36. Eaton Rouge, arsenal and barracks at seized by State troops, 1.181; secession convention at 1.182; occupation of by a National force, 2.526; battle of, 2.529; evacuation of by National troops, 2.530. Battery Harrison, Capture of by General Ord, III 358; repulse of Confederates at, 3.359. Bayou Rapide, Gen. A. J. Smith at, 3.255. Bayou Sara, bombarded by Porter, 2.530. Bayou Teche, battle of the, 2.597. Bean's Station, battle at, 3.281. Beaufort, S. C., occupation of by national troops, i, 124. Beausfort district, first regiment of colored troops raised in, 2.565. Beauregard, Gen. G. T., demands the surrender of Fort Sumter, 1.317; opens fire on Fort Sumter, 1.320; infamous proclamation of (note), 1.550; position and number of troops under at Manassas, 1.582,. 585; his plan of attack, i 590; re-enforced by Johnson, 1.591, and by E. Kirby Smith, 1.602; h
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
to be met by the gun-boats Estrella and St. Mary's, and intending to co-operate with General Weitzel in the waters of Atchafalaya. He had on board the 21st Indiana regiment. With a great deal of difficulty he succeeded in getting the Estrella, Sthoun into Atchafalaya Bay, from the channels of which the enemy had removed all the stakes and buoys. Entering the Atchafalaya River the little flotilla met the Confederate iron-clad Cotton, which after a sharp engagement made her escape up the rivnemy had crossed over and was making its way up to Franklin. They were immediately followed by the flotilla up the Atchafalaya River, through Bayou Teche to a point five miles above Pattersonville, and three from the mouth of the Teche — where the Bayou Teche to a point five miles above Pattersonville, and three from the mouth of the Teche — where the enemy was found posted in force. The gun-boats opened fire, and the enemy retreated to a point two miles further up the river, where they had obstructed the approaches with piles, and where they were also supported by the gun-boat Cotton, which ves
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
n a reconnaissance, with Lieutenant Allen, U. S. A., of General Weitzel's staff, and two companies of infantry on board. She was ordered to proceed down the Atchafalaya River as far as the mouth of the Teche and return by the lake. Disobeying this order, Acting-Master Peterson attempted to return to Berwick Bay by the way of AtAtchafalaya. After passing the mouth of the Teche lie was attacked from shore by field-pieces and sharp-shooters. The men fought well, and the action lasted two hours and three-quarters. The captain of the Diana was killed early in the action, and his executive officer, Acting-Master's Mate Thomas G. Hall,was mortally wounded; alsn as the firing was heard at the bay, the Calhoun, Acting-Master M. Jordan, was sent into the lake to ascertain the cause of it. She arrived at the mouth of the Atchafalaya, where she grounded and remained until midnight. Several of the crew of the Diana had escaped, and they informed the commanding officer of the Calhoun that t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
he logs resting on the bottom. Finally, a forest of trees had been cut from the banks and floated down upon the piles, making an apparently impassable obstruction. When the Admiral found the character of these obstructions, he feared that they would delay the vessels so long that the enemy would escape from Fort De Russy, and destroy all their stores and munitions of war. General Smith and he agreed, therefore, that it was best to land the troops: so the Admiral turned off into the Atchafalaya River with the Benton, Lexington, Chillicothe, Louisville, Mound City, Carondelet, Ouichita, Pittsburg, and Gazelle, followed by the troops in transports; while the rest of the gun-boats pushed on up Red River, with instructions to remove the obstructions, but not to attack Fort De Russy until the flagship's arrival, or until General Smith's troops came in sight. The enemy had at this place some 5,000 men, and the only chance of capturing them was by a combined movement of the Army and Na
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
as intent on a march on Shreveport, although in a letter to Halleck he says: The rivers and bayous have not been so low in this State for fifty years, and Admiral Porter informs me that the mouth of the Red River, and also the mouth of the Atchafalaya, are both hermetically sealed to his vessels by almost dry sand-bars, so that he cannot get any of the vessels into any of the streams. It is supposed that the first rise of the season will occur early in the next month. (!) Whatever may about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry for
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
nton, La.; Conrad McRae, Fordocke, La.; W. Barton, Atchafalaya River, La.; J. J. Morgan, Atchafalaya River, La.; T. G. CalviAtchafalaya River, La.; T. G. Calvit, Atchafalaya River, La.; James E. Lindsey, Atchafalaya River, La.; William N. Lindsey, Atchafalaya River, La.; William H. Atchafalaya River, La.; James E. Lindsey, Atchafalaya River, La.; William N. Lindsey, Atchafalaya River, La.; William H. Neilson, Atchafalaya River, La.; Samuel Faulkner, Atchafalaya River, La.; Colonel James M. Porter, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Atchafalaya River, La.; William N. Lindsey, Atchafalaya River, La.; William H. Neilson, Atchafalaya River, La.; Samuel Faulkner, Atchafalaya River, La.; Colonel James M. Porter, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. B. Davis, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. Offat, St. Landry, La.; Captain James Cappes, St. Landry, La.; S. A. Scribner, StAtchafalaya River, La.; William H. Neilson, Atchafalaya River, La.; Samuel Faulkner, Atchafalaya River, La.; Colonel James M. Porter, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. B. Davis, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. Offat, St. Landry, La.; Captain James Cappes, St. Landry, La.; S. A. Scribner, St. Landry, La.; Elbert Goull, St. Landry, La.; T. C. Anderson, St. Landry, La.; Simon Richard, St. Landry, La.; Henderson TayAtchafalaya River, La.; Samuel Faulkner, Atchafalaya River, La.; Colonel James M. Porter, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. B. Davis, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. Offat, St. Landry, La.; Captain James Cappes, St. Landry, La.; S. A. Scribner, St. Landry, La.; Elbert Goull, St. Landry, La.; T. C. Anderson, St. Landry, La.; Simon Richard, St. Landry, La.; Henderson Taylor, Marksville, La.; S. L. Taylor, Marksville, La.; H. Robertson, Alexandria, La.; S. W. Henarie, Alexandria, La.; GovernorAtchafalaya River, La.; Colonel James M. Porter, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. B. Davis, St. Landry, La.; Colonel Wm. Offat, St. Landry, La.; Captain James Cappes, St. Landry, La.; S. A. Scribner, St. Landry, La.; Elbert Goull, St. Landry, La.; T. C. Anderson, St. Landry, La.; Simon Richard, St. Landry, La.; Henderson Taylor, Marksville, La.; S. L. Taylor, Marksville, La.; H. Robertson, Alexandria, La.; S. W. Henarie, Alexandria, La.; Governor T. O. Moore, Alexandria, La.; Colonel C. Manning, Alexandria, La.; General M. Wells, Rapides and Aveyellos Parish, La.; Genutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsey, while employed in the Atchafalaya River, started down with the Chillicothe, Neosho, and Fort
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
no time had any idea of doing. His policy was to fight Farragut's fleet, under the cover of the forts, in the narrow channel which had been left by the Confederate engineers. The only thing wanting to make Farragut satisfied with his condition was the arrival of the Tecumseh, and this took place on the 4th of August. He now determined to make his attack as soon as possible. As soon as General Canby had arrived in New Orleans with the troops which General Banks left crossing the Atchafalaya River, Farragut communicated with him and requested that two or three thousand troops be sent to co-operate with him in an attack on Mobile. These troops were promised without hesitation on the 8th of July, in an interview held on board the Hartford, between the Admiral and Generals Canby and Granger; but circumstances soon obliged General Canby to say that he could only spare troops enough to invest one fort. Farragut then suggested that it should be Fort Gaines, and engaged at the same
e, 564; end of Grant's campaign of 1864 and losses of the, 597 Arnold, Gen., occupies Pensacola, 459. arson, during N. York and Brooklyn riots, 505. Asboth, Gen. Alex., 28-9; at Pea Ridge, 30. Ashby, Gen. Turner, killed, 137. Atchafalaya river, Col. Bailey constructs a bridge over the, 551; Banks's army retreats across the, 551. Atlanta, Campaign of Sherman. 625; route of his advance to, 627; defenses of, 631; flanked by the right, 635; abandoned by Hood, 637; Sherman's army osses, 539-40; fights again at Pleasant Grove, 541; again at Pleasant Hill, 543; retreats to Grand Ecore, 545; extract from his report. 545; Grant orders him to close his Shreveport campaign, 550; he abandons Alexandria and retreats to the Atchafalaya river, 551; transfers his army to Gen. Canby, and proceeds to New Orleans, 551. Barclay, Col., 23d Ga., killed at Antietam, 210. Barksdale, Gen. Wm., at Fredericksburg, 345; at Chancellorsville, 363; killed at Gettysburg, 388. Barlow, G
with the Army, it 13 difficult to understand what good season the War Department could have had for thus wiping out the honored name under which the corps had fought so long and well. Nineteenth Corps. Baton Rouge Georgia Landing Bayou Teche Fort Bisland Irish Bend Plains' Store assault on Port Hudson, May 27th assault on Port Hudson, June 14th Port Hudson Trenches Thibodeaux Brashear City Donaldsonville Sabine Cross Roads Pleasant Hill Cane River Cloutierville Alexandria Mansura Yellow Bayou Atchafalaya Berry ville Opequon Fisher's Hill Cedar Creek. Organized under General Order No. 5, dated at Washington, Jan. 5, 1863:--By direction of the President, the troops in the Department of the Gulf will constitute the Nineteenth Army Corps, to date from December 14, 1862, and Mtajor-General N. P. Banks is assigned to the command. At this time the troops of the Nineteenth Corps were, for the most part, just arriving from the North on ocean transports
Doc. 131.-Red River expedition. Reports of Admiral Porter. Mississippi Squadron, flag-ship Black Hawk, off Red River, March 2, 1864. sir: I came down here anticipating a move on the part of the army up toward Shreveport; but as the river is lower than it has been known to be for years, I much fear that the combined movement cannot come off without interfering with plans formed by General Grant. General Sherman has gone to New-Orleans to make arrangements with General Banks, and I am expecting his return every day. In the mean time the gunboats are up the Atchafalaya and Black Rivers, destroying bridges and stores, and endeavoring to destroy eight thousand cattle collected at Sicily Island. The Mississippi River is very quiet, and the rebels retreated into the interior on hearing of the advance of the gunboats. I am, sir, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy,. Washington, D. C.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...