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Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 2 0 Browse Search
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Monuments. Probably one of the first objects of the stranger's attention in approaching Mount Auburn, will be the Egyptian gateway at the principal entrance. Of the design of this we have spoken before. It has met with general favor; but the nsiderable or conspicuous Botanical establishment, to be connected with the Cemetery, (as the reader of the history of Mount Auburn will have noticed was the design,) has, as we understand, been long since abandoned. One of the most remarkable in every respect of the monuments at Mount Auburn will be likely to attract the visitor's notice-notwithstanding the charms of sweet little Garden Pond which he leaves on his left-before he has advanced far up the principal avenue leading from the gate-e Committee first above named, viz: That a place for the permanent deposit of the body of Dr. Spurzheim be prepared at Mount Auburn, in case it should not be requested to be sent to Europe by his friends and relatives; and that a monument be erected
merican version of this characteristic. The feeling in which the beautiful establishment at Mount Auburn originated, and the spirit which has sustained it so well, are consolatory symptoms of a bettton vaults. The poorest village may be far abler than the most opulent metropolis to emulate Mount Auburn in its way, for nature, and the love of it, are all it needs. All? I think I hear some rea may include. And yet, for such as incline to be discontented with the historical poverty of Mount Auburn,--for such, still more, as commit the error of confounding this want (a comparative want) of lands,--for these, it may be well to consider how much better and fitter an establishment is Mount Auburn, for the purposes its founders and friends had in view when they reared it, than Pere la Chaiseless clod, It rests until that trump shall sound, The awaking trump of God! A thought of Mount Auburn. Miss M. A. Browne. Of Liverpool. Received by the Editor in reply to a letter communicati
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Sweet Auburn and Mount Auburn. (search)
Sweet Auburn and Mount Auburn. Mrs. Caroline F. Orne. Under these two names-Sweet Auburn and Mount Auburn — have the beautiful grounds, now endeared to countless hearts, been known and loved for more than a century. In 1635, Simon Stone, an Mount Auburn — have the beautiful grounds, now endeared to countless hearts, been known and loved for more than a century. In 1635, Simon Stone, an English gentleman, came to New England with his family and settled on the banks of the Charles River; and his broad lands, after having passed from father to son in unbroken line of descent, for over two hundred years, form now portions of the Cambridge Cemetery and of Mount Auburn. In the former a small tablet, marked Simon Stone, denotes the spot where still lives and bears fruit one of the ancient pear trees planted by the pilgrim's hand, and looked on with reverential interest by his descendants to the eleventh generation. Stone's Mount, on which the Tower in Mount Auburn stands, formed a part also of the many acres of Simon Stone and his descendants. These beautiful grounds possessed every variety of charm that nature could bestow
tertown; and if there be any other, the reference will be easily perceived. A. Abbott, Daniel, owned a house in 1635, at the N. W. corner of Holyoke and Mount Auburn streets, which he sold to John Russell, and removed to Providence, R. I., about 1639. No trace is found here of his family. 2. George, in 1715, purchased abert Wilson of Sudbury. Widow Ruth Abdy, who d. 10 Dec. 1762, aged 93, was a subsequent wife of Matthew. He is supposed to have resided at the S. W. corner of Mt. Auburn and Holyoke streets, and to have died in 1730, leaving no posterity. For several years he was a fisherman; but in 1718 he was appointed College Sweeper and Bedhe f. inherited the homestead (which was sold by his heirs to Gov. Gerry, 4 Ap. 1793), but during the latter part of his life resided on the westerly corner of Mount Auburn and Brighton streets. He was one of the most active citizens in the Revolutionary period, and succeeded Thomas Gardner as Colonel; he was Selectman, Treasurer
A. Abbott, Daniel, owned a house in 1635, at the N. W. corner of Holyoke and Mount Auburn streets, which he sold to John Russell, and removed to Providence, R. I., about 1639. No trace is found here of his family. 2. George, in 1715, purchased a building lot, near Adams's gate. By w. Rebecca, he had Jacob, b. 25 Jan. 1715-16; George. b. 2 Oct. 1718; Rebecca, bap. 24 June 1721; Rebecca, bap, 22 Nov. 1724; Samuel, bap. 12 Mar. 1726-7. Abdy, Matthew, Boston, came in the Abigail, 1635, ew (1), b. about 1654, m. Deborah, dau. of Andrew Stevenson of Camb., and wid. of Robert Wilson of Sudbury. Widow Ruth Abdy, who d. 10 Dec. 1762, aged 93, was a subsequent wife of Matthew. He is supposed to have resided at the S. W. corner of Mt. Auburn and Holyoke streets, and to have died in 1730, leaving no posterity. For several years he was a fisherman; but in 1718 he was appointed College Sweeper and Bedmaker, an office in which his widow succeeded him. After his death, Father Abdy's Wi
Putnam 13 Feb. 1776; Ebenezer, bap. 28 Sept. 1759, d. young; Mary, bap. 17 May 1767, m. Thomas Payson 12 May 1785, d. 1805; Elizabeth, bap. 24 Mar. 1771, d. about 1792; Samuel, bap. 7 July 1776; Ebenezer, bap. 18 Oct. 1778, grad. H. C. 1798, a lawyer in Thomaston, Me., m. Lucy F., dau. of Gen. Henry Knox, and d. in 1841. Samuel the f. inherited the homestead (which was sold by his heirs to Gov. Gerry, 4 Ap. 1793), but during the latter part of his life resided on the westerly corner of Mount Auburn and Brighton streets. He was one of the most active citizens in the Revolutionary period, and succeeded Thomas Gardner as Colonel; he was Selectman, Treasurer, and Representative, and while holding these several offices, died suddenly of apoplexy 27 June 1786; his w. Mary d. 7 Nov. 1815, a. 80. 5. Samuel, s. of Samuel (4), b. 1 July 1776, grad. H. C. 1798, m. Sally Brown of Concord Jan. 1800, and had Harriet Howard, b. 28 May 1801; Elizabeth, b. 1 Ap. 1803, d. Jan. 1827; Samuel, b. 1
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1852. (search)
vain for needed relief. Amid the din of battle he would kneel by a dying comrade to receive his whispered and choking accents of parting love to dear ones at home. The remains of Colonel Revere were removed to Massachusetts and interred at Mount Auburn, amidst the verdant beauties of that Nature whose loveliness he never failed, even amid the stern scenes of war, to notice and enjoy. Robert Ware. Surgeon 44th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), August 29, 1862; died at Washington, N. C., AprilThe body remained at that place till the siege was raised. It was then disinterred for removal to the North; and as it passed through Newbern, funeral services were held there at the request of the regiment. The final interment took place at Mount Auburn on the 1st of May following. His assistant, Dr. Fisher, wrote:— I cannot but think that the anxiety and fatigue of his assiduous and unremitting labors for the regiment, which he had previously borne so well, by a cumulative process p
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1864. (search)
mmand. Let me offer to yourself and family my deep feeling of sympathy in this loss to ourselves and to our country. . . . William Cogswell, Brevet Brigadier-General United States Volunteers. Lieutenant Storrow was buried near the battle-field, beside Captain Grafton of his regiment, who was killed in the same engagement, and whose memoir is also contained in this volume. In the following winter his remains were recovered, and reinterred (January 6, 1866) in the family tomb at Mount Auburn. There were many to whom it seemed peculiarly mournful that a young man whose career had shown such traits of consistent nobleness should thus fall at the very end of the great national struggle, when a few weeks more of service might have brought him safely home. Perhaps, however, the parents who had so promptly devoted him to the nation's cause may have felt this peculiar circumstance less than those who viewed it from a greater distance. As there was nothing else for them to regre
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 10 (search)
tely full of blossoms, and now of yellow birds. Opposite me was Del Sarto's Madonna; behind me Silenus, holding in his arms the infant Pan. I felt very content with my pen, my daily bouquet, and my yellow birds. About five I would go out and walk till dark; then would arrive my proofs, like crabbed old guardians, coming to tea every night. So passed each day. The 23d of May, my birth-day, about one o'clock, I wrote the last line of my little book; Bummer on the Lakes. then I went to Mount Auburn, and walked gently among the graves. As the brothers had now left college, and had entered or were entering upon professional and commercial life, while the sister was married, and the mother felt calls to visit in turn her scattered children, it was determined to break up the Home. As a family, Margaret writes, we are henceforth to be parted. But though for months I had been preparing for this separation, the last moments were very sad. Such tears are childish tears, I know,
Mary M. McKay. In the death of Miss Mary M. McKay of 254 School street, the Historical Society has lost a faithful and devoted member. Miss McKay was the daughter of the late George and Jane McKay of Charlestown, where she was born sixty years ago. For the past fourteen years she had made her home with her sister, Mrs. James G. Hinckley, of this city. Her death occurred after a five weeks illness, on Saturday, August 29, 1903. Besides Mrs. Hinckley, two other sisters, Mrs. Jacob T. Hutchinson and Miss Eliza J. McKay, also a member of this society, and a brother, George E. McKay, superintendent of the Boston markets, are left to mourn her loss. The interment was in the family lot at Mt. Auburn. Miss McKay, by her kind and cheerful disposition, and by her many other admirable qualities of mind and heart, won the esteem and friendship of a large circle of friends in this vicinity.
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