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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
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ut not a stain of blood was to be seen. He was a brave man; must have been to meet death so coolly. Pity he had not died in action, that his friends and family might revere his memory! This is evening, and I am writing this on some boxes of cartridges, by the fire out in the open air, and the wind keeps my candle flickering. The transports have come back and landed the troops on the other side of the river, and we are going to-morrow, report says, back to Stevensburgh, by the way of Port Conway. Charles Brooke, Quartermaster Sergeant, in charge Ordnance Train, Kilpatrick's Expedition. New-York Tribune account. Washington, Saturday, March 5, 1864. The much talked of raid by General Kilpatrick has ended with failure as to the main result intended to be accomplished, but with success in cutting the railroads between Lee's army and Richmond, and the destruction of much property, stores, etc., and the actual shelling of Richmond. Starting on Sunday at three A. M., fro
er's brink. It had been determined, in council of war, held on Wednesday, that, instead of extending our lines of operations along the river from Falmouth to Port Conway, the entire army should be crossed at or near Fredericksburgh. Five pontoon-bridges were to be thrown across the river — the first at the Lacey House, which claim that General Burnside has succeeded in outgeneralling and outwitting them. His decoys to make them believe that we were about to cross our main force at Port Conway, seem to have succeeded admirably. I suppose there is no harm now in my mentioning that among the ruses he employed was sending down, day before yesterday, to Port Conway, three hundred wagons, and bringing them back by a different road, for the sole purpose of making the rebels believe that we were about to cross the river at that point. To the same end, workmen were busily employed in laying causeways for supposed pontoon-bridges there, while the gunboats were held as bugaboos at the
the vicinity of Culpeper Court-House, where a strong force of infantry being met, Buford was obliged to retire. This reconnoissance, it is believed, had the effect to cause the enemy to withdraw his infantry to the south side of the Rapidan. About the middle of August a considerable detachment was withdrawn from this army under the orders of the General-in-Chief, for duty elsewhere. On the first of September Brigadier-General Kilpatrick, commanding a division of cavalry, proceeded to Port Conway, on the Lower Rappahannock, where, after driving across the river a force of cavalry and infantry which the enemy had on the north bank, he, by means of his artillery, effectually destroyed the two gun-boats, recently captured by the enemy on the Potomac, and which they had brought to this point. On the thirteenth of September, intelligence having been received rendering it probable the enemy was making a retrograde movement, Major-General Pleasanton, in command of all the cavalry, sup
ights, or more briefly, O. A. K., the Corps de Belgique, and by various other names. Washington livery stable, 1865 where booth bought a horse after Lincoln's assassination After shooting President Lincoln in a box at Ford's Theater in Washington, April 14, 1865, Wilkes Booth escaped from the city. Guided by sympathizers, he crossed the Potomac near Port Tobacco, Md., to Mathias Point, Va., on the night of Saturday, April 22d. The following Monday he crossed the Rappahannock from Port Conway to Port Royal and took refuge in a barn. Here he was discovered two days later by a detachment of Company L, Sixteenth New York Cavalry, and killed. The assassination of the President was the result of a conspiracy. William H. Seward, Secretary of State, was attacked on the same evening by Lewis Payne, a fellow-conspirator of Booth, and was severely injured. Those suspected of being involved in the conspiracy were tried before a military commission convened at Washington May 9, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Madison, James 1751- (search)
Madison, James 1751- Fourth President of the United States, from March 4, 1809, to March 4, 1817; Republican; born in Port Conway, Va., March 16, 1751; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1771, studied law, and in 1776 was elected to a seat in the Virginia Assembly. He became a member of the executive council in 1778, and was sent to Congress in 1779. In that body he continually opposed the issue of paper money by the States. He was active until the peace in 1783, when he retired to private life, but was drawn out Montpelier, the home of Madison. again as a delegate to the convention that framed the national Constitution. In that body he took a prominent part in the debates, and wrote some of the papers in The Federalist, which advocated the adoption of that instrument. He was also in the Virginia Convention in 1788 that ratified the Constitution. A member of Congress from 1789 to 1797, Madison did much in the establishment of the nation on a firm foundation. Unitin
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1863 (search)
dPENNSYLVANIA--13th Cavalry. WEST VIRGINIA--3d Cavalry. Union loss, 8 killed, 6 wounded. Total, 14. April 22-23: Expedition from Belle Plains to Port Royal and Port ConwayMICHIGAN--24th Infantry. NEW YORK--84th Infantry. April 22-29: Operations in Shenandoah ValleyOHIO--116th and 123d Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--12th and 13th Cavalryrmish, Barbee's Cross RoadsOHIO--6th Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 2 killed, 4 wounded, 24 missing. Total, 30. Sept. 1: Skirmish, Lamb's Creek Church, near Port ConwayMICHIGAN--1st and 5th Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--18th Cavalry. VERMONT--1st Cavalry. Sept. 1: Skirmish, LeesburgNEW YORK--1st Cavalry (Detachment). Sept. 1: Skirmish, Corbin's Cross RoadsPENNSYLVANIA--4th Cavalry. Sept. 1-3: Expedition to Port Conway, and destruction of Gunboats "Satellite" and "Release"MICHIGAN--1st, 5th, 6th and 7th Cavalry. NEW YORK--2d and 5th Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--18th Cavalry. VERMONT--1st Cavalry. WEST VIRGINIA--1st Cavalry. UNITED STATES--Battery "E," 4th Arty. Se
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
July 25. King George Court House August 24. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Lamb's Creek Church, near Port Conway, SeptembPort Conway, September 1. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Stevensburg and Pony Mountain September 13. Culpeper Court House House August 24. Hartwood Church August 25. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Lamb's Creek Church, near Port Conway, SeptembPort Conway, September 1. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Culpeper Court House September 13. Raccoon Ford September 14-16. July 24. King George Court House August 24. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan Sugust 15. King George Court House August 24. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan S3. At Belle Plain till April. Expedition to Port Royal and Port Conway April 22-23. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Ope
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
yville July 16. Bristerburg July 27. Fairfax August 3. Thoroughfare Gap August 5. Near Aldie August 12-14. U. S. Ford August 22. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Lamb's Creek September 1. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Culpeper Court House September 13. Somervilled Williamsport July 6. Boonsboro July 8. Hagerstown July 11-13. Falling Waters July 14. Hagerstown July 15. Ashby's Gap July 26. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Lamb's Creek September 1. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Culpeper Court House September 13. Rapidan St2-December 8. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth and Belle Plain till April 27, 1863. Mud March January 20-24. Expedition to Port Conway April 22-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Pollock's Mill Creek April 29-May 2. Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-30. Battle of
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
8 and 9. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Picket near King George Court House till January, 1863. Mud March January 20-24. (Co. H at Headquarters of 6th Corps February 22 to August 15.) Picket duty from Falmouth to Port Conway till April 26. Chancellorsville Campaign April 26-May 8. Oak Grove April 26. Rapidan Station May 1. (Co. H at Chancellorsville May 1-5.) Stoneman's Raid May 27-April 8. Brandy Station or Fleetwood and Beverly Ford June 9. 2. Monterey Gap July 4. Smithburg, Md., July 5. Williamsport July 6. Hagerstown July 6. Boonsboro July 8. Hagerstown July 11-13. Falling Water July 14. Battle Mountain near Newby's Cross Roads July 24. Expedition to Port Conway September 1-3. Lamb's Creek September 1. Advance to the Rapidan September 13-17. Culpeper C. H. and Brandy Station September 13. Rapidan Station September 13-14. Reconnoissance across the Rapidan September 21-23. Bristoe Camp
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
otomac, to September, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to March, 1864. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Army Corps, to June, 1865. Service. Duty at Falmouth, Va., till April 27, 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 14-July 24. Skirmish at Haymarket June 25. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Expedition to Port Conway August 31-September 4. Richardson's Ford September 1. Duty on Orange & Alexandria Railroad and the Rappahannock till October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. South side of the Rappahannock October 12. Auburn and Bristoe October 14. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly's Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. M
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